Bassam R Ali

Emirates University, Arab, Alabama, United States

Are you Bassam R Ali?

Claim your profile

Publications (83)252.48 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: FGF23 is essential for the homeostasis of phosphate, and vitamin D. Loss-of-function mutations in this hormone cause hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC). Earlier reports suggested that intact FGF23 from loss of function mutants such as FGF23/S129F (iFGF23/S129F) is retained intracellularly while the carboxy-terminal fragment is secreted. We sought to investigate the fate of iFGF23/S129F mutant hormone in vivo and in vitro. Five patients clinically diagnosed with HFTC and confirmed by DNA sequencing to carry the c.386 C>T; p.S129F mutation in the homozygous state were studied. Healthy and heterozygous individuals were used as controls in the study. Using ELISA assays, we showed that iFGF23/S129F was 2-5 folds higher in patients' plasma, compared to heterozygous or healthy controls. Importantly, the mutant hormone could not be detected in the patients' sera. However, using proteinase inhibition profiling, we found that a serum metalloproteinase degraded the iFGF23/S129F explaining our failure to detect it in sera. The serum metalloproteinase degrades the WT and the mutant at different rates. Also, confocal microscopy imaging using wild-type (WT) FGF23 or FGF23/S129F mutant in transiently transfected HEK293 and HeLa cells showed weak staining of the Golgi complex with some vesicular staining resembling the ER. Additionally, FGF23 variants (FGF23/WT, FGF23/S129F, FGF23/S71G, and FGF23/R176Q) from stably transfected HEK293 cells secreted high levels into a serum-free medium that can be detected by ELISA and Western blot. Our results suggest that iFGF23/S129F mutant bypasses the ER/Golgi quality control system to the circulation of HFTC patients by an unknown pathway. Finally, we hypothesize that either the mutant hormone is unable to bind α-Klotho-FGFR1c, or it binds the dyad receptor with low affinity and, therefore, incapable of initiating maximal intracellular signalling. Our findings raise the potential use of the WT hormone in therapies of some HFTC patients.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Bone
  • Source

    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The gene encoding the AT-rich interaction domain-containing protein 1B (ARID1B) has recently been shown to be one of the most frequently mutated genes in patients with intellectual disability (ID). The phenotypic spectrums associated with variants in this gene vary widely ranging for mild to severe non-specific ID to Coffin-Siris syndrome. In this study, we evaluated three children from a consanguineous Emirati family affected with ID and dysmorphic features. Genomic DNA from all affected siblings was analyzed using CGH array and whole-exome sequencing (WES). Based on a recessive mode of inheritance, homozygous or compound heterozygous variants shared among all three affected children could not be identified. However, further analysis revealed a heterozygous variant (c.4318C>T; p.Q1440*) in the three affected children in an autosomal dominant ID causing gene, ARID1B. This variant was absent in peripheral blood samples obtained from both parents and unaffected siblings. Therefore, we propose that the most likely explanation for this situation is that one of the parents is a gonadal mosaic for the variant. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a gonadal mosaicism inheritance of an ARID1B variant leading to familial ID recurrence. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Schizophrenia is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder of unknown etiology. PDLIM5 variants have been linked to schizophrenia and other related neuropsychiatric disorders and upregulated in the brain of schizophrenia patients suggesting a possible pathogenic role in disease progression. The aim of this study is to examine the potential association of schizophrenia in Emirati patients with previously reported variants in PDLIM5, PICK1, NRG3 or DISC1 genes. Consequently, we found a secondary association between PDLIM5 variants and the paranoid subtype of schizophrenia in Emirati Arabs suggesting that PDLIM5 may represent a determinate/marker for schizophrenia subtype specification. However, no associations were found with variants in PICK1, NRG3 or DISC1 genes.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Meta Gene
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In recent years, the translation of genomic discoveries into mainstream medical practice and public health has gained momentum, facilitated by the advent of new technologies. However, there are often major discrepancies in the pace of implementation of genomic medicine between developed and developing/resource-limited countries. The main reason does not only lie in the limitation of resources but also in the slow pace of adoption of the new findings and the poor understanding of the potential that this new discipline offers to rationalize medical diagnosis and treatment. Here, we present and critically discuss examples from the successful implementation of genomic medicine in resource-limited countries, focusing on pharmacogenomics, genome informatics, and public health genomics, emphasizing in the latter case genomic education, stakeholder analysis, and economics in pharmacogenomics. These examples can be considered as model cases and be readily replicated for the wide implementation of pharmacogenomics and genomic medicine in other resource-limited environments.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Human genomics
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Intellectual disability (ID) is a major public health burden on most societies with significant socioeconomic costs. It has been shown that genetic mutations in numerous genes are responsible for a proportion of hereditary forms of ID. NOP2/Sun transfer RNA (tRNA) methyltransferase family member 2 encoded by NSUN2 gene is a highly conserved protein and has been shown to cause autosomal recessive ID type 5 (MRT5). In this study, we recruited an Emirati consanguineous family with a patient diagnosed with ID. Whole-exome sequencing revealed a homozygous variant c.1020delA in NSUN2 gene. The variants segregated in an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance in the family. This variant is novel and causes a frameshift and premature stop codon. At the messenger RNA (mRNA) level, relative expression analysis showed a decreased level of NSUN2 mRNA in the affected child compared to a healthy individual. Mutation prediction analysis and clinical investigation confirmed the pathogenic nature of the identified variant. We therefore conclude that c.1020delA mutation in NSUN2 is most likely the cause of ID in our patient.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of Molecular Neuroscience
  • Source

    Full-text · Article · May 2015

  • No preview · Article · May 2015 · The Journal of Dermatology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Joubert syndrome (JS) is a rare autosomal recessive (AR), neurological condition characterized by dysgenesis of the cerebellar vermis with the radiological hallmark of molar tooth sign, oculomotor apraxia, recurrent hyperventilation and intellectual disability. Most cases display a broad spectrum of additional features, including polydactyly, retinal dystrophy and renal abnormalities, which define different subtypes of JS-related disorders (JSRDs). To date, 23 genes have been shown to cause JSRDs, and although most of the identified genes encode proteins involved in cilia function or assembly, the molecular mechanisms associated with ciliary signaling remain enigmatic. Arab populations are ethnically diverse with high levels of consanguinity (20–60%) and a high prevalence of AR disorders. In addition, isolated communities with very-high levels of inbreeding and founder mutations are common. In this article, we review the 70 families reported thus far with JS and JSRDs that have been studied at the molecular level from all the Arabic countries and compile the mutations found. We show that JS and the related JSRDs are genetically heterogeneous in Arabs, with 53 mutations in 15 genes. Thirteen of these mutations are potentially founder mutations for the region.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Familial Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (FPAH) is a relatively rare but fatal disorder characterized by elevated arterial pressure caused by abnormal proliferation of endothelial cells of the arteries, which eventually leads to heart failure and death. FPAH is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait and is caused by heterozygous mutations in the BMPR2 gene encoding the bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPR2). BMPR2 belongs to the TGF β/BMP super-family of receptors involved in a signal transduction cascade via the SMAD signaling pathway. The BMPR2 polypeptide is composed of 1038 amino acids and consists of a ligand binding domain, a kinase domain and a cytoplasmic tail. To investigate the cellular and functional consequence of BMPR2 mutations, C-terminally FLAG-tagged constructs of eighteen pathogenic BMPR2 missense mutants were generated by site directed mutagenesis and expressed in HeLa and HEK-293T cell lines. The subcellular localizations of the mutant proteins were investigated using immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Post translational modifications of the proteins were analyzed by Endoglycosidase H deglycosylation assay. Our results indicated that mutations in the ligand binding domain affecting highly conserved cysteine residues resulted in retention of the mutant proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), as evident from their co-localization with the ER resident protein calnexin. The kinase domain mutants showed both ER and plasma membrane (PM) distributions, while the cytoplasmic tail domain variants localized exclusively to the PM. The subcellular localizations of the mutants were further confirmed by their characteristic glycosylation profiles. In conclusion, our results indicate that ER quality control (ERQC) is involved in the pathological mechanism of several BMPR2 receptor missense mutations causing FPAH, which can be explored as a potential therapeutic target in the future. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Gene
  • Source
    Reham M. Milhem · Lihadh Al-Gazali · Bassam R. Ali
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Muscle, skeletal, receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) is a key organizer at the postsynaptic membrane and critical for proper development and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction. Mutations in MUSK result in congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS). We hypothesized that the CMS-causing missense mutation (P344R), found within the cysteine rich domain of the protein, will affect its conformational tertiary structure. Consequently, the protein willmisfold, get retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)leading to the loss of its biological function through degradation by the highly conserved ER Associated protein Degradation (ERAD)machinery. We report how P344R-MuSK mutant is trafficking-deficient when expressed at 37 °C inHeLa, COS-7 and HEK293cell lines. It colocalized with the ER marker calnexinin contrast to the MuSKwild-type whichlocalized to the plasma membrane. The N-glycosylation status of the P344R mutant is that of an immature and not properly post-translationally modified protein. Inhibition of protein synthesis showed that the P344R mutant'shalf-life is shorter than MuSKwild-type protein. Proteasomal inhibition resulted in the stabilization of the mutant protein.The mutant protein ishighly ubiquitinatedcompared to wild type suggesting its targeting for proteasomaldegradation.P344R-MuSK mutant'strafficking defect is correctable by culturing the expressing cells at 27 °C and is able to autophosphorylate.Moreover, chemical compounds namely 2.5% glycerol,1% dimethyl sulfoxide, 10 μMthapsigargin and 1 μM curcuminimproved thematuration and exit of the mutant protein from the ER.These findings open perspectives for potential therapeutic interventionfor patients with CMSharboring the P344R-MuSK mutation.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · The International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Recent studies have implicated the WW domain-containing oxidoreductase encoding gene (WWOX) in a severe form of autosomal recessive neurological disorder. This condition showed an overlapping spectrum of clinical features including spinocerebellar ataxia associated with generalized seizures and delayed psychomotor development to growth retardation, spasticity, and microcephaly. We evaluated a child from a consanguineous Emirati family that presented at birth with growth retardation, microcephaly, epileptic seizures, and later developed spasticity and delayed psychomotor development. Screening for deletions and duplications using whole-chromosomal microarray analysis identified a novel homozygous microdeletion encompassing exon 5 of the WWOX gene. Analysis of parental DNA indicated that this deletion was inherited from both parents and lies within a large region of homozygosity. Sanger sequencing of the cDNA showed that the deletion resulted in exon 5 skipping leading to a frame-shift and creating a premature stop codon at amino acid position 212. Quantification of mRNA revealed striking low level of WWOX expression in the child and moderate level of expression in the mother compared to a healthy control. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first homozygous germline structural variation in WWOX gene resulting in truncated transcripts that were presumably subject to NMD pathway. Our findings extend the clinical and genetic spectrum of WWOX mutations and support a crucial role of this gene in neurological development.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · Journal of Molecular Neuroscience
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Deficiency of Asparagine Synthetase (ASNSD, MIM 615574) is a very rare autosomal recessive disorder presenting with some brain abnormalities. Affected individuals have congenital microcephaly and progressive encephalopathy associated with severe intellectual disability and intractable seizures. The loss of function of the asparagine synthetase (ASNS, EC 6.3.5.4), particularly in the brain, is the major cause of this particular congenital microcephaly. In this study, we clinically evaluated an affected child from a consanguineous Emirati family presenting with congenital microcephaly and epileptic encephalopathy. In addition, whole-exome sequencing revealed a novel homozygous substitution mutation (c.1193A > C) in the ASNS gene. This mutation resulted in the substitution of highly conserved tyrosine residue by cysteine (p.Y398C). Molecular modeling analysis predicts hypomorphic and damaging effects of this mutation on the protein structure and altering its enzymatic activity. Therefore, we conclude that the loss of ASNS function is most likely the cause of this condition in the studied family. This report brings the number of reported families with this very rare disorder to five and the number of pathogenic mutations in the ASNS gene to four. This finding extends the ASNS pathogenic mutations spectrum and highlights the utility of whole-exome sequencing in elucidation the causes of rare recessive disorders that are heterogeneous and/or overlap with other conditions.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014 · Metabolic Brain Disease
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dysequilibrium syndrome (DES, OMIM 224050) is a genetically heterogeneous condition that combines autosomal recessive non-progressive cerebellar ataxia with mental retardation. The subclass dysequilibrium syndrome type 1 (CAMRQ1) has been attributed to mutations in the VLDLR gene encoding the Very Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (VLDLR). This receptor is involved in the reelin signalling pathway that guides neuronal migration in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. Three missense mutations (c.1459G>T; p.D487Y, c.1561G>C; p.D521H and c.2117G>T; p.C706F) have been previously identified in VLDLR gene in patients with DES. However, the functional implications of those mutations are not known and therefore we undertook detailed functional analysis to elucidate the cellular mechanisms underlying their pathogenicity. The mutations have been generated by site-directed mutagenesis and then expressed in cultured cell lines. Confocal microscopy and biochemical analysis have been employed to examine the subcellular localization and activities of the mutated proteins relative to wild type. Our results indicate that the three missense mutations lead to defective intracellular trafficking and ER retention of the mutant VLDLR protein. This trafficking impairment prevents the mutants from reaching the plasma membrane and binding exogenous Reelin, the initiating event in Reelin signalling. Collectively, our results provide evidence that ER quality control is involved in the functional inactivation and underlying pathogenicity of these DES-associated mutations in the VLDLR.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Cell Research
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Congenital myasthenic syndromes with endplate acetylcholinesterase deficiency are very rare autosomal recessive disorders characterized by onset of the disease in early childhood, general weakness exacerbated by exertion, ophthalmoplegia and refractoriness to anticholinesterase drugs. To date, all reported cases have been attributed to mutations in 18 genes including the COLQ gene which encodes for a specific collagen that anchors acetylcholinesterase at the basal lamina of the neuromuscular junction. We identified an inbred Syrian family with two children of consanguineous parents from two branches affected with congenital myasthenic syndrome with endplate acetylcholinesterase deficiency. Method The absence of acetylcholinesterase antibodies was demonstrated biochemically in the patients. Consequently, all the coding regions, exon-intron boundaries and the 5’ and 3’ untranslated regions of the COLQ gene were amplified and sequenced using the Sanger sequencing method. Results We observed that the severity of the phenotype in the two affected children was variable. One patient had mild symptoms that included difficulties in gait and feeding with mild respiratory insufficiency. Her sibling died in the first months of life due to severe respiratory failure. The second patient had severe symptoms from birth and has been mechanically ventilated. DNA sequencing revealed a novel homozygous single nucleotide substitution mutation (c.1010T>C) in the COLQ gene in both patients. This substitution leads to a missense amino acid substitution at position 337 of the protein (p.Ile337Thr). This mutation is likely to impair the COLQ’s trimeric organization and therefore it’s anchoring within the synaptic basal lamina. Conclusion We identified the molecular cause underlying CMS in two patients. The marked phenotypic variation suggests that other factors including modifier genes may affect the severity of this disease.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014 · Pediatric Neurology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Fifteen missense mutations in the frizzled family receptor 4 (FZD4) reported to cause familial exudative vitreoretinopathy (FEVR) were evaluated to establish the pathological cellular mechanism of disease and to explore novel therapeutic strategies. Methods: The mutations were generated by site-directed mutagenesis and expressed in HeLa and COS-7 cell lines. Confocal fluorescence microscopy and N-glycosylation profiling were used to observe the subcellular localization of the mutant proteins relative to wild-type (WT). Polyubiquitination studies were used to establish the involvement of the proteasome. Culturing at reduced temperatures and incubation in the presence of chemical compounds were used to enhance mutant protein processing and exit out of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Results: Confocal fluorescence microscopy of the mutants showed three distinct subcellular localizations, namely, a plasma membrane pattern, an ER pattern, and a mixed pattern to both compartments. Confocal fluorescence microscopy and N-glycosylation profiling established the predominant ER localization of P33S, G36N, H69Y, M105T, M105V, C181R, C204R, C204Y, and G488D mutants. Coexpression of these mutants with WT FZD4 showed the inability of the mutants to trap WT FZD4. Culturing the expressing cells at reduced temperatures or in the presence of chemical agents directed at ameliorating protein misfolding resulted in partial rescue of trafficking defects observed for M105T and C204Y mutants. Conclusions: Defective trafficking resulting in haploinsufficiency is a major cellular mechanism for several missense FEVR-causing FZD4 mutants. Our findings indicate that this trafficking defect might be correctable for some mutants, which may offer opportunities for the development of novel therapeutics approaches for this condition.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Investigative ophthalmology & visual science
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The rare autosomal genetic disorder, Spondylo-meta-epiphyseal dysplasia with short limbs and abnormal calcifications (SMED-SL), is reported to be caused by missense or splice site mutations in the human discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) gene. Previously our group has established that trafficking defects and loss of ligand binding are the underlying cellular mechanisms of several SMED-SL causing mutations. Here we report the clinical characteristics of two siblings of consanguineous marriage with suspected SMED-SL and identification of a novel disease causing mutation in the DDR2 gene. Clinical evaluation and radiography were performed to evaluate the patients. All the coding exons and splice sites of the DDR2 gene were sequenced by Sanger sequencing. Subcellular localization of the mutated DDR2 protein was determined by confocal microscopy, deglycosylation assay and Western blotting. DDR2 activity was measured by collagen activation and Western analysis. In addition to the typical features of SMED-SL, one of the patients has an eye phenotype including visual impairment due to optic atrophy. DNA sequencing revealed a novel homozygous dinucleotide deletion mutation (c.2468_2469DelCT) on exon 18 of the DDR2 gene in both patients. The mutation resulted in a frameshift leading to an amino acid change at position S823 and a predicted premature termination of translation (p.S823Cfs*2). Subcellular localization of the mutant protein was analyzed in mammalian cell lines, and it was found to be largely retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which was further supported by its N-glycosylation profile. In keeping with its cellular mis-localization, the mutant protein was found to be deficient in collagen-induced receptor activation, suggesting protein trafficking defects as the major cellular mechanism underlying the loss of DDR2 function in our patients. Our results indicate that the novel mutation results in defective trafficking of the DDR2 protein leading to loss of function and disease. This confirms our previous findings that DDR2 missense mutations occurring at the kinase domain result in retention of the mutant protein in the ER.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · BMC Medical Genetics
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Whereas many genes associated with intellectual disability (ID) encode synaptic proteins, transcriptional defects leading to ID are less well understood. We studied a large, consanguineous pedigree of Arab origin with seven members affected with ID and mild dysmorphic features. Homozygosity mapping and linkage analysis identified a candidate region on chromosome 17 with a maximum multipoint logarithm of odds score of 6.01. Targeted high-throughput sequencing of the exons in the candidate region identified a homozygous 4-bp deletion (c.169_172delCACT) in the METTL23 (methyltransferase like 23) gene, which is predicted to result in a frameshift and premature truncation (p.His57Valfs*11). Overexpressed METTL23 protein localized to both nucleus and cytoplasm, and physically interacted with GABPA (GA-binding protein transcription factor, alpha subunit). GABP, of which GABPA is a component, is known to regulate the expression of genes such as THPO (thrombopoietin) and ATP5B (ATP synthase, H+ transporting, mitochondrial F1 complex, beta polypeptide) and is implicated in a wide variety of important cellular functions. Overexpression of METTL23 resulted in increased transcriptional activity at the THPO promoter, whereas knockdown of METTL23 with siRNA resulted in decreased expression of ATP5B, thus revealing the importance of METTL23 as a regulator of GABPA function. The METTL23 mutation highlights a new transcriptional pathway underlying human intellectual function.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014 · Human Molecular Genetics
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Germline heterozygous mutations in the tumor suppresser NF1 gene cause a cancer predisposition syndrome known as neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). This disease is one of the most common multisystem disorders with an estimated incidence of 1 in 3,000 to 1 in 4,000 births. Clinically, NF1 patients are prone to develop "café au lait" spots, neurofibromas, Lisch nodules, freckling of the axillary, or inguinal region and optic nerve gliomas. In the present study, we report clinical and molecular findings of five unrelated patients and seven cases from four families with NF1 from UAE. To reveal the genetic defects underlying NF1 in our cohort of patients, we screened the whole coding and splice site regions of the NF1 gene. In addition, MLPA or CGH array has been used to screen for structural variations including deletions, indels, and complex rearrangements. This resulted in the identification of five distinct novel mutations and two previously reported ones. These variations included three missense and one nonsense mutations, one single base, one dinucleotide, and one large deletion. Four mutations were inherited, and the remaining were absent from both parents and therefore are "de novo" mutations. This analysis represents the spectrum of NF1 mutations in UAE and supports the premise of absence of hotspot mutations in the NF1 gene. Moreover, no obvious genotype-phenotype correlations were observed in our patients.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · Child s Nervous System
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Geleophysic dysplasia (GD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by short stature, brachydactyly, stiff joints, thick skin, and cardiac valvular abnormalities that are often responsible for early death. Mutations in ADAMTSL2 and FBN1 genes have been shown to cause GD due to the dysregulation of transforming growth factor-β signaling pathways. Small numbers of mutations in ADAMTSL2 have been reported so far in patients with GD type 1 (GD1). In this study, we clinically evaluated two children from two consanguineous Arab families living in the United Arab Emirates with GD1. In addition we have sequenced all the coding exons of ADAMTSL2 gene using Sanger sequencing. The two patients exhibited most of the typical features of this rare bone dysplasia. Molecular analysis of the ADAMTSL2 gene revealed two novel homozygous missense mutations (c.938T>C, p.M313T and c.499G>A, p.D167N). The mutations segregated well in the studied families with the parents being heterozygous. In addition, bioinformatics analyses showed that these mutations are affecting conserved amino acids residues and thus strongly support their pathogenicity. We describe the clinical phenotypes of two patients with GD1 that are caused by two novel homozygous missense mutations in the ADAMTSL2 gene. Birth Defects Research (Part A), 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · Birth Defects Research Part A Clinical and Molecular Teratology

Publication Stats

1k Citations
252.48 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2011-2015
    • Emirates University
      Arab, Alabama, United States
  • 2007-2015
    • United Arab Emirates University
      • Department of Pathology
      Al Ain, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
  • 2013
    • Emirates Aviation College
      Dubayy, Dubai, United Arab Emirates
  • 2000-2010
    • Imperial College London
      • • Molecular Medicine
      • • Faculty of Medicine
      • • Division of Cell and Molecular Biology
      • • Centre for Molecular Microbiology and Infection
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 1995-2006
    • Babraham Institute
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom