Mahfuza Akter

University of Dhaka, Mujib City, Dhaka, Bangladesh

Are you Mahfuza Akter?

Claim your profile

Publications (6)9.21 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The methanolic extract of Trichosanthes anguina fruits was evaluated for its antihyperglycemic and antinociceptive potentials in Swiss albino mice. Antihyperglycemic activity was evaluated through oral glucose tolerance tests in glucose-loaded mice, while antinociceptive potential was evaluated in pain model mice, where pain was induced through intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid, resulting in pain and concomitant abdominal constrictions (writhings). In antihyperglycemic activity tests conducted with glucose-loaded Swiss albino mice, methanolic extract of fruits significantly and dose-dependently reduced blood glucose concentrations. At extract doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight mice, the percent lowering of blood sugar by the extract was, respectively, 18.9, 27.6, 35.0, and 51.4. The results were both dose-dependent and statistically significant. A standard antihyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, when administered to glucose-loaded mice at a dose of 10 mg per kg body weight, reduced blood sugar levels by 55.2%. The results demonstrate that the methanolic extract possesses antihyperglycemic potential. In antinociceptive activity tests conducted with intraperitoneally administered acetic acidinduced pain model in mice, the extract at the afore-mentioned four doses dosedependently and significantly reduced the number of abdominal constrictions in mice caused by pain, respectively, by 35.3, 38.2, 41.2, and 44.1%. A standard antinociceptive drug, aspirin, when administered at doses of 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight, reduced the number of writhings by 47.1 and 61.8%, respectively. The results thus demonstrate also significant antinociceptive potential of fruits of the plant. The results suggest that phytochemicals present in fruits deserve further scientific attention towards possible discovery of antihyperglycemic and pain-alleviating drugs.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Amaranthus tricolor whole plants are used by folk medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh for treatment of pain, anaemia, dysentery, skin diseases, diabetes, and as a blood purifier. Thus far, no scientific studies have evaluated the antihyperglycaemic and antinociceptive effects of the plant. The present study was carried out to evaluate the possible glucose tolerance efficacy of methanolic extracts of A. tricolour whole plants using glucose-induced hyperglycaemic mice, and antinociceptive effects with acetic acid-induced gastric pain models in mice. In antihyperglycaemic activity tests, the extract at different doses was administered one hour prior to glucose administration and blood glucose level was measured after two hours of glucose administration (p.o.) using glucose oxidase method. The statistical data indicated the significant oral hypoglycaemic activity on glucose-loaded mice at all doses of the extracts tested. Maximum antihyperglycaemic activity was shown at 400 mg extract per kg body weight, which was comparable to that of a standard drug, glibenclamide (10 mg/kg body weight). In antinociceptive activity tests, the extract also demonstrated a dose-dependent significant reduction in the number of writhings induced in mice through intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid. Maximum antinociceptive activity was observed at a dose of 400 mg extract per kg body weight, which compared favourably with that of a standard antinociceptive drug, aspirin, when administered at a dose of 200 mg per kg body weight. The results validate the folk medicinal use of the plant for reduction of blood sugar in diabetic patients as well as the folk medicinal use for alleviation of pain. The results suggest that this plant may possess further potential for scientific studies leading to possible discovery of efficacious antihyperglycaemic and antinociceptive components.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2013 · African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Amaranthus tricolor whole plants are used by folk medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh for treatment of pain, anaemia, dysentery, skin diseases, diabetes, and as a blood purifier. Thus far, no scientific studies have evaluated the antihyperglycaemic and antinociceptive effects of the plant. The present study was carried out to evaluate the possible glucose tolerance efficacy of methanolic extracts of A. tricolour whole plants using glucose-induced hyperglycaemic mice, and antinociceptive effects with acetic acid-induced gastric pain models in mice. In antihyperglycaemic activity tests, the extract at different doses was administered one hour prior to glucose administration and blood glucose level was measured after two hours of glucose administration (p.o.) using glucose oxidase method. The statistical data indicated the significant oral hypoglycaemic activity on glucose-loaded mice at all doses of the extracts tested. Maximum antihyperglycaemic activity was shown at 400 mg extract per kg body weight, which was comparable to that of a standard drug, glibenclamide (10 mg/kg body weight). In antinociceptive activity tests, the extract also demonstrated a dose-dependent significant reduction in the number of writhings induced in mice through intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid. Maximum antinociceptive activity was observed at a dose of 400 mg extract per kg body weight, which compared favourably with that of a standard antinociceptive drug, aspirin, when administered at a dose of 200 mg per kg body weight. The results validate the folk medicinal use of the plant for reduction of blood sugar in diabetic patients as well as the folk medicinal use for alleviation of pain. The results suggest that this plant may possess further potential for scientific studies leading to possible discovery of efficacious antihyperglycaemic and antinociceptive components.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2013 · African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The Smilax genus consists of about 300-350 species and can be found in the temperate zones, tropics and sub-tropical regions of the world. By nature, they are climbing flowering plants. Smilax perfoliata is a woody climbing plant found in the forest regions of Bangladesh. Leaves of the plant are often used in the folk medicinal system of Bangladesh for treatment of frequent urination and diabetes. As part of our ongoing studies on antihyperglycemic activity evaluation in medicinal plants of Bangladesh, the objective of the present study was to determine whether leaves of the plant have antihyperglycemic activity, as determined through oral glucose tolerance tests in glucose-loaded mice. The methanol extract of leaves of Smilax perfoliata, when administered at doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight to glucose-loaded mice demonstrated dose-dependent antihyperglycemic activity. The percent reductions in serum glucose concentrations at these doses were, respectively, 16.7, 17.2, 27.6 and 56.8%; the results were statistically significant at all doses tested. The reduction in serum glucose concentration by 56.8% at the highest dose tested of 400 mg per kg body weight compares favorably with that of a standard drug, glibenclamide, which when administered at a dose of 10 mg per kg body weight, led to serum glucose reduction by 58.3%. The results validate the traditional use of this plant in Bangladesh to lower blood sugar in diabetic patients and merit further studies of the phytochemical constituents of the plant for their individual antihyperglycemic potentials.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2012 · Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The leaves of Piper betle L. (Piperaceae) are widely chewed in Bangladesh as betel quid with or without tobacco. Chewing of leaves of the plant is advised by the folk medicinal practitioners of Bangladesh to alleviate pain (particularly toothache) and lowering of blood sugar, as well as aid the digestive process. The objective of this study was to scientifically evaluate the folk medicinal practitioner's claims of the antihyperglycemic and antinociceptive properties of Piper betle leaves. Antihyperglycemic activity evaluation was conducted through oral glucose tolerance tests in glucose-loaded Swiss albino mice, while antinociceptive activity tests were performed in gastric pain models in Swiss albino mice, where gastric pain was induced by intraperitoneal administration of acetic acid. In antihyperglycemic activity tests, methanolic extract of leaves demonstrated dose-dependent and significant lowering of blood sugar in glucose-challenged mice. At extract doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight, prior oral administration of the extract reduced blood sugar levels by 31.01, 34.38, 38.88 and 46.74%, respectively, as compared to control animals. A standard antihyperglycemic drug, glibenclamide, when orally administered at a dose of 10 mg per kg body weight lowered blood glucose levels by 46.07%. As such, the results strongly indicate that leaves of the plant possess potent antihyperglycemic properties. In antinociceptive activity tests, the methanolic extract of the leaves significantly and dosedependently reduced the number of gastric writhings in gastric pain-induced mice. At doses of 50, 100, 200 and 400 mg extract per kg body weight, the percent reductions in writhings were, respectively, 47.00, 63.28, 69.40 and 71.48 as compared to control mice. The standard antinociceptive drug, aspirin, when administered at doses of 200 and 400 mg per kg body weight, reduced the number of writhings by 51.04 and 67.32%, respectively. The extract, therefore, appears to be more potent than aspirin in alleviation of pain. Overall, the results validate the folk medicinal uses of the leaves of this plant and suggest that more scientific researches need to be carried out on isolation and identification of the relevant bioactive components present within the leaves of this plant.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2012 · Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This cross sectional descriptive study was done to find out common clinical presentations, etiologies and laboratory investigation abnormalities in patients of periodic paralysis. Study was carried out in 30 patients with an age range from 8 to 70 years who were enrolled from July 2008 to June 2009 in Mymensingh Medical College Hospital (MMCH) medicine unit. Individuals who were admitted with sudden onset generalized muscle weakness, had history of previous attack and serum potassium level <3mmol/l or >5.5mmol/l were included in this study. In this series, majority of the patients were male (66.67%). Male: female ratio was approximately 2:1. The mean age of the patients was 27.4±4.5 years. Majority (26.67%) of them were in age range of 31-40 years. About 30% of the patients experienced the first attack of paralysis at the age of 20-24 years. Majority of patients (53%) were from middle class family with occupation of private service (26.66%) and farmer (20%). Positive family history was reported in 20% of patients. Regarding the precipitating factors, majority of patients (83.3%) were related to high carbohydrate meal, 56.67% related to temperature, 41.67% to exercise. Flaccid muscle weakness with variables muscle power (MRC grade 4/5 to 2/5 in 60% and 1/5 to 0/5 in 40%) was found. Cerebellar functions, all modalities of sensations and functions of cranial nerves were intact in all patients. In this series, laboratory investigations revealed reduced serum potassium level (<3mmol/l) in 90% of patients. Serum potassium value >5.5mmol/l was found in only 3.33% of patients. Creatine kinase (MM) was raised in 23% of the patients and Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level was 0.8-2mmol/l in 6% of the patients. More than half of the patients (56%) showed variable ECG changes. Impaired nerve conduction function was found in 28.00%. So, careful history taking, meticulous clinical examination and simple laboratory investigations is sufficient to make a prompt diagnosis and rapid management of patients with periodic paralysis.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2012 · Mymensingh Medical Journal