Sudharshan S. Vazhkudai

Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Florida, United States

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Publications (79)16.37 Total impact

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    Dataset: TG07 Lynch

    Full-text · Dataset · Aug 2015
  • Source
    Dataset: TG07 Lynch

    Full-text · Dataset · Aug 2015
  • Feiyi Wang · Sarp Oral · Saurabh Gupta · Devesh Tiwari · Sudharshan S. Vazhkudai
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    ABSTRACT: With the advent of big data, the I/O subsystems of large-scale compute clusters are becoming a center of focus. More applications are putting greater demands on end-to-end I/O performance. These subsystems are often complex in design. They comprise of multiple hardware and software layers to cope with the increasing capacity, capability, and scalability requirements of data intensive applications. However, the sharing nature of storage resources and the intrinsic interactions across these layers make it a great challenge to realize end-to-end performance gains. This paper proposes a topology-aware strategy to balance the load across resources, to improve the per-application I/O performance. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm on an extreme-scale compute cluster, Titan, at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). Our experiments with both synthetic benchmarks and a real-world application show that, even under congestion, our proposed algorithm can improve large-scale application I/O performance significantly, resulting in both a reduction in application run time as well as a higher resolution of simulation run.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Increase in graphics hardware performance and improvements in programmability has enabled GPUs to evolve from a graphics-specific accelerator to a general-purpose computing device. Titan, the world's second fastest supercomputer for open science in 2014, consists of more dum 18,000 GPUs that scientists from various domains such as astrophysics, fusion, climate, and combustion use routinely to run large-scale simulations. Unfortunately, while the performance efficiency of GPUs is well understood, their resilience characteristics in a large-scale computing system have not been fully evaluated. We present a detailed study to provide a thorough understanding of GPU errors on a large-scale GPU-enabled system. Our data was collected from the Titan supercomputer at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility and a GPU cluster at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. We also present results from our extensive neutron-beam tests, conducted at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) and at ISIS (Rutherford Appleron Laboratories, UK), to measure the resilience of different generations of GPUs. We present several findings from our field data and neutron-beam experiments, and discuss the implications of our results for future GPU architects, current and future HPC computing facilities, and researchers focusing on GPU resilience.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) has deployed multiple large-scale parallel file systems (PFS) to support its operations. During this process, OLCF acquired significant expertise in large-scale storage system design, file system software development, technology evaluation, benchmarking, procurement, deployment, and operational practices. Based on the lessons learned from each new PFS deployment, OLCF improved its operating procedures, and strategies. This paper provides an account of our experience and lessons learned in acquiring, deploying, and operating large-scale parallel file systems. We believe that these lessons will be useful to the wider HPC community.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The deluge of data from scientific instruments (SNS, LHC), experiments (DZero) and observations (SDSS) will soon surpass the ability of storage systems to store and retrieve data in a reliable and cost-effective manner. While the capacity, performance and the mean time to failure (MTTF) of a single disk has been improving, large-scale storage systems and parallel file systems (PFS) can comprise tens of thousands of drives, thus bringing down the overall mean time to data loss (MTTDL) of the entire system to unacceptably low levels. For example, the Lustre-based Spider PFS of the Jaguar supercomputer (№ 3 machine on the Top500 list) comprises 10,000+ disks. An exaflop machine in 2018 is projected to host hundreds of thousands of drives to support the desired I/O throughput.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015
  • Devesh Tiwari · Saurabh Gupta · Sudharshan S. Vazhkudai
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    ABSTRACT: Continuing increase in the computational power of supercomputers has enabled large-scale scientific applications in the areas of astrophysics, fusion, climate and combustion to run larger and longer-running simulations, facilitating deeper scientific insights. However, these long-running simulations are often interrupted by multiple system failures. Therefore, these applications rely on 'check pointing'' as a resilience mechanism to store application state to permanent storage and recover from failures. Unfortunately, check pointing incurs excessive I/O overhead on supercomputers due to large size of checkpoints, resulting in a sub-optimal performance and resource utilization. In this paper, we devise novel mechanisms to show how check pointing overhead can be mitigated significantly by exploiting the temporal characteristics of system failures. We provide new insights and detailed quantitative understanding of the check pointing overheads and trade-offs on large-scale machines. Our prototype implementation shows the viability of our approach on extreme-scale machines.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2014
  • Yang Liu · Raghul Gunasekaran · Xiaosong Ma · Sudharshan S. Vazhkudai
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    ABSTRACT: Competing workloads on a shared storage system cause I/O resource contention and application performance vagaries. This problem is already evident in today's HPC storage systems and is likely to become acute at exascale. We need more interaction between application I/O requirements and system software tools to help alleviate the I/O bottleneck, moving towards I/O-aware job scheduling. However, this requires rich techniques to capture application I/O characteristics, which remain evasive in production systems. Traditionally, I/O characteristics have been obtained using client-side tracing tools, with drawbacks such as non-trivial instrumentation/development costs, large trace traffic, and inconsistent adoption. We present a novel approach, I/O Signature Identifier (IOSI), to characterize the I/O behavior of data-intensive applications. IOSI extracts signatures from noisy, zero-overhead server-side I/O throughput logs that are already collected on today's supercomputers, without interfering with the compiling/execution of applications. We evaluated IOSI using the Spider storage system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the S3D turbulence application (running on 18,000 Titan nodes), and benchmark-based pseudo-applications. Through our experiments we confirmed that IOSI effectively extracts an application's I/O signature despite significant server-side noise. Compared to client-side tracing tools, IOSI is transparent, interface-agnostic, and incurs no overhead. Compared to alternative data alignment techniques (e.g., dynamic time warping), it offers higher signature accuracy and shorter processing time.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Feb 2014
  • Henry M. Monti · Ali R. Butt · Sudharshan S. Vazhkudai
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    ABSTRACT: Innovative scientific applications and emerging dense data sources are creating a data deluge for high-end supercomputing systems. Modern applications are often collaborative in nature, with a distributed user base for input and output data sets. Processing such large input data typically involves copying (or staging) the data onto the supercomputer's specialized high-speed storage, scratch space, for sustained high I/O throughput. This copying is crucial as remotely accessing the data while an application executes results in unnecessary delays and consequently performance degradation. However, the current practice of conservatively staging data as early as possible makes the data vulnerable to storage failures, which may entail restaging and reduced job throughput. To address this, we present a timely staging framework that uses a combination of job start-up time predictions, user-specified volunteer or cloud-based intermediate storage nodes, and decentralized data delivery to coincide input data staging with job start-up. Evaluation of our approach using both PlanetLab and Azure cloud services, as well as simulations based on three years of Jaguar supercomputer (No. 3 in Top500) job logs show as much as 91.0 percent reduction in staging times compared to direct transfers, 75.2 percent reduction in wait time on scratch, and 2.4 percent reduction in usage/hour. (An earlier version of this paper appears in [30].).
    No preview · Article · Sep 2013 · IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems
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    ABSTRACT: Modern scientific discovery is increasingly driven by large-scale supercomputing simulations, followed by data analysis tasks. These data analyses are either performed offline, on smaller-scale clusters, or on the supercomputer itself. Unfortunately, these techniques suffer from performance and energy inefficiencies due to increased data movement between the compute and storage subsystems. Therefore, we propose Active Flash, an insitu scientific data analysis approach, wherein data analysis is conducted on the solid-state device (SSD), where the data already resides. Our performance and energy models show that Active Flash has the potential to address many of the aforementioned concerns without degrading HPC simulation performance. In addition, we demonstrate an Active Flash prototype built on a commercial SSD controller, which further reaffirms the viability of our proposal.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013
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    ABSTRACT: Modern scientific discovery often involves running complex application simulations on supercomputers, followed by a sequence of data analysis tasks on smaller clusters. This offline approach suffers from significant data movement costs such as redundant I/O, storage bandwidth bottleneck, and wasted CPU cycles, all of which contribute to increased energy consumption and delayed end-to-end performance. Technology projections for an exascale machine indicate that energy-efficiency will become the primary design metric. It is estimated that the energy cost of data movement will soon rival the cost of computation. Consequently, we can no longer ignore the data movement costs in data analysis. To address these challenges, we advocate executing data analysis tasks on emerging storage devices, such as SSDs. Typically, in extreme-scale systems, SSDs serve only as a temporary storage system for the simulation output data. In our approach, Active Flash, we propose to conduct in-situ data analysis on the SSD controller without degrading the performance of the simulation job. By migrating analysis tasks closer to where the data resides, it helps reduce the data movement cost. We present detailed energy and performance models for both active flash and offline strategies, and study them using extreme-scale application simulations, commonly used data analytics kernels, and supercomputer system configurations. Our evaluation suggests that active flash is a promising approach to alleviate the storage bandwidth bottleneck, reduce the data movement cost, and improve the overall energy efficiency.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Oct 2012

  • No preview · Conference Paper · Oct 2012
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    ABSTRACT: The exponential growth in user and application data entails new means for providing fault tolerance and protection against data loss. High Performance Computing (HPC) storage systems, which are at the forefront of handling the data deluge, typically employ hardware RAID at the backend. However, such solutions are costly, do not ensure end-to-end data integrity, and can become a bottleneck during data reconstruction. In this paper, we design an innovative solution to achieve a flexible, fault-tolerant, and high-performance RAID-6 solution for a parallel file system (PFS). Our system utilizes low-cost, strategically placed GPUs - both on the client and server sides - to accelerate parity computation. In contrast to hardware-based approaches, we provide full control over the size, length and location of a RAID array on a per file basis, end-to-end data integrity checking, and parallelization of RAID array reconstruction. We have deployed our system in conjunction with the widely-used Lustre PFS, and show that our approach is feasible and imposes acceptable overhead.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2012
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    Chao Wang · Sudharshan S Vazhkudai · Xiaosong Ma · Fei Meng · Youngjae Kim · Christian Engelmann
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    ABSTRACT: DRAM is a precious resource in extreme-scale machines and is increasingly becoming scarce, mainly due to the growing number of cores per node. On future multi-petaflop and exaflop machines, the memory pressure is likely to be so severe that we need to rethink our memory usage models. Fortunately, the advent of non-volatile memory (NVM) offers a unique opportunity in this space. Current NVM offerings possess several desirable properties, such as low cost and power efficiency, but suffer from high latency and lifetime issues. We need rich techniques to be able to use them alongside DRAM. In this talk, we present a novel approach for exploiting NVM as a secondary memory partition so that applications can explicitly allocate and manipulate memory regions therein. More specifically, we propose an NVMalloc library with a suite of services that enables applications to access a distributed NVM storage system. We have devised ways within NVMalloc so that the storage system, built from compute node-local NVM devices, can be accessed in a byte-addressable fashion using the memory mapped I/O interface. Our approach has the potential to re-energize out-of-core computations on largescale machines by having applications allocate certain variables through NVMalloc, thereby increasing the overall memory capacity available. Our evaluation on a 128-core cluster shows that NVMalloc enables applications to compute problem sizes larger than the physical memory in a cost-effective manner. It can bring more performance/efficiency gain with increased computation time between NVM memory accesses or increased data access locality. In addition, our results suggest that while NVMalloc enables transparent access to NVM-resident variables, the explicit control it provides is crucial to optimize application performance.
    Full-text · Article · May 2012
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    Simona Boboila · Youngjae Kim · Sudharshan S. Vazhkudai · Peter Desnoyersand · Galen M. Shipman
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    ABSTRACT: Next generation science will increasingly come to rely on the ability to perform efficient, on-the-fly analytics of data generated by high-performance computing (HPC) simulations, modeling complex physical phenomena. Scientific computing workflows are stymied by the traditional chaining of simulation and data analysis, creating multiple rounds of redundant reads and writes to the storage system, which grows in cost with the ever-increasing gap between compute and storage speeds in HPC clusters. Recent HPC acquisitions have introduced compute node-local flash storage as a means to alleviate this I/O bottleneck. We propose a novel approach, Active Flash, to expedite data analysis pipelines by migrating to the location of the data, the flash device itself. We argue that Active Flash has the potential to enable true out-of-core data analytics by freeing up both the compute core and the associated main memory. By performing analysis locally, dependence on limited bandwidth to a central storage system is reduced, while allowing this analysis to proceed in parallel with the main application. In addition, offloading work from the host to the more power-efficient controller reduces peak system power usage, which is already in the megawatt range and poses a major barrier to HPC system scalability. We propose an architecture for Active Flash, explore energy and performance trade-offs in moving computation from host to storage, demonstrate the ability of appropriate embedded controllers to perform data analysis and reduction tasks at speeds sufficient for this application, and present a simulation study of Active Flash scheduling policies. These results show the viability of the Active Flash model, and its capability to potentially have a transformative impact on scientific data analysis.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2012

  • No preview · Conference Paper · Oct 2011
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    Henry M. Monti · Ali R. Butt · Sudharshan S. Vazhkudai
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    ABSTRACT: Modern High-Performance Computing (HPC) centers are facing a data deluge from emerging scientific applications. Supporting large data entails a significant commitment of the high-throughput center storage system, scratch space. However, the scratch space is typically managed using simple “purge policies,” without sophisticated end-user data services to balance resource consumption and user serviceability. End-user data services such as offloading are performed using point-to-point transfers that are unable to reconcile center's purge and users' delivery deadlines, unable to adapt to changing dynamics in the end-to-end data path and are not fault-tolerant. Such inefficiencies can be prohibitive to sustaining high performance. In this paper, we address the above issues by designing a framework for the timely, decentralized offload of application result data. Our framework uses an overlay of user-specified intermediate and landmark sites to orchestrate a decentralized fault-tolerant delivery. We have implemented our techniques within a production job scheduler (PBS) and data transfer tool (BitTorrent). Our evaluation using both a real implementation and supercomputer job log-driven simulations show that: the offloading times can be significantly reduced (90.4 percent for a 5 GB data transfer); the exposure window can be minimized while also meeting center-user service level agreements.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2011 · IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems
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    Ramya Prabhakar · Sudharshan S. Vazhkudai · Youngjae Kim · Ali Raza Butt · Min Li · Mahmut T. Kandemir
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    ABSTRACT: Massively parallel scientific applications, running on extreme-scale supercomputers, produce hundreds of terabytes of data per run, driving the need for storage solutions to improve their I/O performance. Traditional parallel file systems (PFS) in high performance computing (HPC) systems are unable to keep up with such high data rates, creating a storage wall. In this work, we present a novel multi-tiered storage architecture comprising hybrid node-local resources to construct a dynamic data staging area for extreme-scale machines. Such a staging ground serves as an impedance matching device between applications and the PFS. Our solution combines diverse resources (e.g., DRAM, SSD) in such a way as to approach the performance of the fastest component technology and the cost of the least expensive one. We have developed an automated provisioning algorithm that aids in meeting the checkpointing performance requirement of HPC applications, by using a least-cost storage configuration. We evaluate our approach using both an implementation on a large scale cluster and a simulation driven by six-years worth of Jaguar supercomputer job-logs, and show that our approach, by choosing an appropriate storage configuration, achieves 41.5% cost savings with only negligible impact on performance.
    Preview · Conference Paper · Jun 2011
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    Henry M. Monti · Ali Raza Butt · Sudharshan S. Vazhkudai
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    ABSTRACT: Modern High Performance Computing (HPC) applications process very large amounts of data. A critical research challenge lies in transporting input data to the HPC center from a number of distributed sources, e.g., scientific experiments and web repositories, etc., and offloading the result data to geographically distributed, intermittently available end-users, often over under-provisioned connections. Such end-user data services are typically performed using point-to-point transfers that are designed for well-endowed sites and are unable to reconcile the center's resource usage and users delivery deadlines, unable to adapt to changing dynamics in the end-to-end data path and are not fault-tolerant. To overcome these inefficiencies, decentralized HPC data services are emerging as viable alternatives. In this paper, we develop and enhance such distributed data services by designing CATCH, a Cloud-based Adaptive data Transfer serviCe for HPC. CATCH leverages a bevy of cloud storage resources to orchestrate a decentralized data transport with fail-over capabilities. Our results demonstrate that CATCH is a feasible approach, and can help improve the data transfer times at the HPC center by as much as 81.1% for typical HPC workloads.
    Preview · Conference Paper · May 2011

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2011

Publication Stats

1k Citations
16.37 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2004-2013
    • Oak Ridge National Laboratory
      • Computer Science and Mathematics Division
      Oak Ridge, Florida, United States
  • 2005
    • North Carolina State University
      • Department of Computer Science
      Raleigh, NC, United States
  • 2000-2003
    • University of Mississippi
      • Department of Computer and Information Science
      University, MS, United States
  • 2001
    • Monash University (Australia)
      Melbourne, Victoria, Australia