T. Sumi

Osaka University, Suika, Ōsaka, Japan

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Publications (168)741.24 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Two cold, gas giant planets orbiting a G-type main sequence star in the galactic disk have previously been discovered in the high magnification microlensing event OGLE-2012-BLG-0026 (Han et al. 2013). Here we present revised host star flux measurements and a refined model for the two-planet system using additional light curve data. We performed high angular resolution adaptive optics imaging with the Keck and Subaru telescopes at two epochs while the source star was still amplified. We detected the lens flux, $H=16.39 \pm 0.08$. The lens, a disk star, is brighter than predicted from the modeling in the original study. We revisited the light curve modeling using additional photometric data from the B\&C telescope in New Zealand and CTIO 1.3m H band light curve. We then include the Keck and Subaru adaptive optic observation constraints. The system is composed of a $\sim 4-9$ Gyr lens star of $\rm M_{lens} = 1.06 \pm 0.05~\,M_\odot$ at a distance of $\rm D_{lens} = 4.0 \pm 0.3~$kpc, orbited by two giant planets of $\rm 0.145 \pm 0.008\ M_{\rm Jup}$ and $0.86 \pm 0.06~\rm M_{\rm Jup}$ with projected separations of $4.0 \pm 0.5 $ AU and $4.8 \pm 0.7$ AU respectively. Since the lens is brighter than the source star by $16 \pm 8 \%$ in H, with no other blend within one arcsec, it will be possible to estimate its metallicity by subsequent IR spectroscopy with 8--10~m class telescopes. By adding a constraint on the metallicity it will be possible to refine the age of the system.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016
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    ABSTRACT: Spitzer microlensing parallax observations of OGLE-2015-BLG-1212 decisively breaks a degeneracy between planetary and binary solutions that is somewhat ambiguous when only ground-based data are considered. Only eight viable models survive out of an initial set of 32 local minima in the parameter space. These models clearly indicate that the lens is a stellar binary system possibly located within the bulge of our Galaxy, ruling out the planetary alternative. We argue that several types of discrete degeneracies can be broken via such space-based parallax observations.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016
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    ABSTRACT: $K2$'s Campaign 9 ($K2$C9) will conduct a $\sim$3.4 deg$^{2}$ survey toward the Galactic bulge from 7/April through 1/July of 2016 that will leverage the spatial separation between $K2$ and the Earth to facilitate measurement of the microlens parallax $\pi_{\rm E}$ for $\gtrsim$120 microlensing events, including several planetary in nature as well as many short-timescale microlensing events, which are potentially indicative of free-floating planets (FFPs). These satellite parallax measurements will in turn allow for the direct measurement of the masses of and distances to the lensing systems. In this white paper we provide an overview of the $K2$C9 space- and ground-based microlensing survey. Specifically, we detail the demographic questions that can be addressed by this program, including the frequency of FFPs and the Galactic distribution of exoplanets, the observational parameters of $K2$C9, and the array of ground-based resources dedicated to concurrent observations. Finally, we outline the avenues through which the larger community can become involved, and generally encourage participation in $K2$C9, which constitutes an important pathfinding mission and community exercise in anticipation of $WFIRST$.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015
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    ABSTRACT: We present the discovery of a Neptune-mass planet orbiting a 0.8 +- 0.3 M_Sun star in the Galactic bulge. The planet manifested itself during the microlensing event MOA 2011-BLG-028/OGLE-2011-BLG-0203 as a low-mass companion to the lens star. The analysis of the light curve provides the measurement of the mass ratio: (1.2 +- 0.2) x 10^-4, which indicates the mass of the planet to be 12-60 Earth masses. The lensing system is located at 7.3 +- 0.7 kpc away from the Earth near the direction to Baade's Window. The projected separation of the planet, at the time of the microlensing event, was 3.1-5.2 AU. Although the "microlens parallax" effect is not detected in the light curve of this event, preventing the actual mass measurement, the uncertainties of mass and distance estimation are narrowed by the measurement of the source star proper motion on the OGLE-III images spanning eight years, and by the low amount of blended light seen, proving that the host star cannot be too bright and massive. We also discuss the inclusion of undetected parallax and orbital motion effects into the models, and their influence onto the final physical parameters estimates.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015
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    ABSTRACT: We present the discovery of the first Neptune analog exoplanet, MOA-2013-BLG-605Lb. This planet has a mass similar to that of Neptune or a super-Earth and it orbits at $9\sim 14$ times the expected position of the snow-line, $a_{\rm snow}$, which is similar to Neptune's separation of $ 11\,a_{\rm snow}$ from the Sun. The planet/host-star mass ratio is $q=(3.6\pm0.7)\times 10^{-4}$ and the projected separation normalized by the Einstein radius is $s=2.39\pm0.05$. There are three degenerate physical solutions and two of these are due to a new type of degeneracy in the microlensing parallax parameters, which we designate "the wide degeneracy". The three models have (i) a Neptune-mass planet with a mass of $M_{\rm p}=21_{-7}^{+6} M_{\rm earth}$ orbiting a low-mass M-dwarf with a mass of $M_{\rm h}=0.19_{-0.06}^{+0.05} M_\odot$, (ii) a mini-Neptune with $M_{\rm p}= 7.9_{-1.2}^{+1.8} M_{\rm earth}$ orbiting a brown dwarf host with $M_{\rm h}=0.068_{-0.011}^{+0.019} M_\odot$ and (iii) a super-Earth with $M_{\rm p}= 3.2_{-0.3}^{+0.5} M_{\rm earth}$ orbiting a low-mass brown dwarf host with $M_{\rm h}=0.025_{-0.004}^{+0.005} M_\odot$. The 3-D planet-host separations are 4.6$_{-1.2}^{+4.7}$ AU, 2.1$_{-0.2}^{+1.0}$ AU and 0.94$_{-0.02}^{+0.67}$ AU, which are $8.9_{-1.4}^{+10.5}$, $12_{-1}^{+7}$ or $14_{-1}^{+11}$ times larger than $a_{\rm snow}$ for these models, respectively. The Keck AO observation confirm that the lens is faint. This discovery suggests that Neptune-like planets orbiting at $\sim 11\,a_{\rm snow}$ are quite common. They may be as common as planets at $\sim 3\,a_{\rm snow}$, where microlensing is most sensitive, so processes similar to the one that formed Uranus and Neptune in our own Solar System may be quite common in other solar systems.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015
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    ABSTRACT: We propose a new concept for spectral characterization of transiting exoplanets with future space-based telescopes. This concept, called as densified pupil spectroscopy, allows us to perform high, stable spectrophotometry against telescope pointing jitter and deformation of the primary mirror instead of not having imaging capability. This densified pupil spectrometer comprises the following three roles: division of a pupil into a number of sub-pupils, densification of each sub-pupil, and acquisition of the spectrum of each sub-pupil with a conventional spectrometer. Focusing on the fact that the divided and densified sub-pupil can be treated as a point source, we discovered that a simplified spectrometer allows us to acquire the spectra of the densified sub-pupils on the detector plane-an optical conjugate with the primary mirror-by putting the divided and densified sub-pupils on the entrance slit of the spectrometer. The acquired multiple spectra are not principally moved on the detector against the pointing jitter and the reliability of the observation result is also increased by statistically treating them. Our numerical calculations show that this method potentially suppresses the instrumental systematic error caused by the telescope pointing jitter down to the same level of photon noise as one-hour integration on a cryogenic telescope with a diameter of 2.5m at 10um. Because future cryogenic large telescopes such as the Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics (SPICA) and the Cryogenic Aperture Large Infrared Space Observatory (CALISTO) will provide us with a thermally stable environment and a low background, they potentially present the first opportunity to characterize the thermal emissions from terrestrial planets.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2015
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    ABSTRACT: For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing data sets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (Amax ∼ 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Real-time modeling of the event while it was still ongoing suggested the presence of an extremely low-mass companion (∼3M) to the lensing star, leading to substantial follow-up coverage of the light curve. We test and compare different models for the light curve and conclude that the data do not favor the planetary interpretation when systematic errors are taken into account. © 2015. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved..
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: We present a statistical analysis of the first four seasons from a "second-generation" microlensing survey for extrasolar planets, consisting of near-continuous time coverage of 8 deg$^2$ of the Galactic bulge by the OGLE, MOA, and Wise microlensing surveys. During this period, 224 microlensing events were observed by all three groups. Over 12% of the events showed a deviation from single-lens microlensing, and for $\sim$1/3 of those the anomaly is likely caused by a planetary companion. For each of the 224 events we have performed numerical ray-tracing simulations to calculate the detection efficiency of possible companions as a function of companion-to-host mass ratio and separation. Accounting for the detection efficiency, we find that $55^{+34}_{-22}\%$ of microlensed stars host a snowline planet. Moreover, we find that Neptunes-mass planets are $\sim10$ times more common than Jupiter-mass planets. The companion-to-host mass ratio distribution shows a deficit at $q\sim10^{-2}$, separating the distribution into two companion populations, analogous to the stellar-companion and planet populations, seen in radial-velocity surveys around solar-like stars. Our survey, however, which probes mainly lower-mass stars, suggests a minimum in the distribution in the super-Jupiter mass range, and a relatively high occurrence of brown-dwarf companions.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015
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    ABSTRACT: We report the discovery of a possible planet in microlensing event MOA-2010-BLG-353. This event was only recognized as having a planetary signal after the microlensing event had finished, and following a systematic analysis of all archival data for binary lens microlensing events collected to date. Data for event MOA-2010-BLG-353 were only recorded by the high-cadence observations of the OGLE and MOA survey groups. If we make the assumptions that the probability of the lens star hosting a planet of the measured mass ratio is independent of the lens star mass or distance, and that the source star is in the Galactic bulge, a probability density analysis indicates the planetary system comprises a $0.9^{+1.6}_{-0.53}$ MSaturn mass planet orbiting a $0.18^{+0.32}_{-0.11}$ M⊙ red dwarf star, $6.43^{+1.09}_{-1.15}$ kpc away. The projected separation of the planet from the host star is $1.72^{+0.56}_{-0.48}$ au. Under the additional assumption that the source is on the far side of the Galactic bulge, the probability density analysis favours a lens system comprising a slightly lighter planet.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    ABSTRACT: We report the detection of a Cold Neptune m_planet=21+/-2MEarth orbiting a 0.38MSol M dwarf lying 2.5-3.3 kpc toward the Galactic center as part of a campaign combining ground-based and Spitzer observations to measure the Galactic distribution of planets. This is the first time that the complex real-time protocols described by Yee et al. (2015), which aim to maximize planet sensitivity while maintaining sample integrity, have been carried out in practice. Multiple survey and follow-up teams successfully combined their efforts within the framework of these protocols to detect this planet. This is the second planet in the Spitzer Galactic distribution sample. Both are in the near-to-mid disk and clearly not in the Galactic bulge.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The presence of excess emission at 3.6--8.0 $\mu$m was investigated in a sample of 27 binary systems located in two nearby star-forming regions, Taurus and Ophiuchus, by using Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) archival data. Angular (Projected) separations for the binaries are greater than 2"($\sim$280 AU), which allowed us to perform spatially resolved photometry of individual primary and secondary sources. The measured occurrence of infrared excess suggests that binarity plays a role in the evolution of circumstellar disks, even at such wide binary separations. Most of the binaries have excess emission from both the circumprimary and circumsecondary disks, or show photospheric levels for both components at all four wavelengths of IRAC. On the other hand, four systems ($17^{+11}_{-8}$%, designated by "mixed" systems) exhibit excess emission from a single binary component. This ratio is significantly smaller than that predicted by the random pairing of single stars, suggesting that circumprimary and circumsecondary disks are synchronously dispersed. In addition, the excess frequencies (EFs) of primary and secondary sources with a projected distance of $a_{\rm p}$$\simeq$280--450 AU are $100^{+0}_{-17}$% and $91^{+8}_{-18}$%, respectively, and significantly higher than that of single stars ($70 \pm 5$%). We made a simple model describing the EF distribution as a function of the disk outer radius, $R_{\rm out}$. Comparisons with observations using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test show that the observational data are consistent with the model when the $\rm{EF} \simeq 1$ region is found at $R_{\rm out}$$\sim$30--100 AU. This disk radius is smaller than that typically estimated for single stars. The high EF of circumstellar disks with these radii may indicate a prolonged lifetime of dust in binary systems possibly because smaller disks counteract mass loss by photoevaporation.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Publications- Astronomical Society of Japan
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    ABSTRACT: To move one step forward toward a Galactic distribution of planets, we present the first planet sensitivity analysis for microlensing events with simultaneous observations from space and the ground. We present this analysis for two such events, OGLE-2014-BLG-0939 and OGLE-2014-BLG-0124, which both show substantial planet sensitivity even though neither of them reached high magnification. This suggests that an ensemble of low to moderate magnification events can also yield significant planet sensitivity and therefore probability to detect planets. The implications of our results to the ongoing and future space-based microlensing experiments to measure the Galactic distribution of planets are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: We report the discovery of a microlensing exoplanet OGLE-2012-BLG-0563Lb with the planet-star mass ratio ~1 x 10^{-3}. Intensive photometric observations of a high-magnification microlensing event allow us to detect a clear signal of the planet. Although no parallax signal is detected in the light curve, we instead succeed at detecting the flux from the host star in high-resolution JHK'-band images obtained by the Subaru/AO188 and IRCS instruments, allowing us to constrain the absolute physical parameters of the planetary system. With the help of a spectroscopic information of the source star obtained during the high-magnification state by Bensby et al. (2013), we find that the lens system is located at 1.3^{+0.6}_{-0.8} kpc from us, and consists of an M dwarf (0.34^{+0.12}_{-0.20} M_sun) orbited by a Saturn-mass planet (0.39^{+0.14}_{-0.23} M_Jup) at the projected separation of 0.74^{+0.26}_{-0.42} AU (close model) or 4.3^{+1.5}_{-2.5} AU (wide model). The probability of contamination in the host star's flux, which would reduce the masses by a factor of up to 3, is estimated to be 17%. This possibility can be tested by future high-resolution imaging. We also estimate the (J-Ks) and (H-Ks) colors of the host star, which are marginally consistent with a low-metallicity mid-to-early M dwarf, although further observations are required for the metallicity to be conclusive. This is the fifth sub-Jupiter-mass (0.2<m_p/M_Jup<1) microlensing planet around an M dwarf with the mass well constrained. The relatively rich harvest of sub-Jupiters around M dwarfs is contrasted with a possible paucity of ~1--2 Jupiter-mass planets around the same type of star, which can be explained by the planetary formation process in the core accretion scheme.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: We present the analysis of MOA-2007-BLG-197Lb, the first brown dwarf companion to a Sun-like star detected through gravitational microlensing. The event was alerted and followed-up photometrically by a network of telescopes from the PLANET, MOA, and uFUN collaborations, and observed at high angular resolution using the NaCo instrument at the VLT. From the modelling of the microlensing light curve, we derived the binary lens separation in Einstein radius units (s~1.13) and a mass ratio of (4.732+/-0.020)x10^{-2}. Annual parallax, lens orbital motion and finite source effects were included in the models. To recover the lens system's physical parameters, we combined the resulting light curve best-fit parameters with (J,H,Ks) magnitudes obtained with VLT NaCo and calibrated using IRSF and 2MASS data. We derived a lens total mass of 0.86+/-0.04 Msun and a lens distance of 4.2+/-0.3 kpc. We find that the companion of MOA-2007-BLG-197L is a brown dwarf of 41+/-2 Mjup observed at a projected separation of 4.3+/-0.1 AU, and orbits a 0.82+/-0.04 Msun G-K dwarf star. We study the statistical properties of this population of brown dwarfs detected by microlensing, transit, radial velocity, and direct imaging (most of these objects orbit solar-type stars), and we performed a two-dimensional, non-parametric probability density distribution fit to the data, which draws a structured brown dwarf landscape. We confirm the existence of a region that is strongly depleted in objects at short periods and intermediate masses (P<30 d, M~30-60 Mjup), but also find an accumulation of objects around P~500 d and M~20 Mjup, as well as another depletion region at long orbital periods (P>500 d) and high masses (M>50 Mjup). While these data provide important clues on mechanisms of brown dwarfs formation, more data are needed to establish their relative importance, in particular as a function of host star mass.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Astronomy and Astrophysics
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    ABSTRACT: We report the discovery of a Jupiter-mass planet orbiting an M-dwarf star that gave rise to the microlensing event OGLE-2011-BLG-0265. Such a system is very rare among known planetary systems and thus the discovery is important for theoretical studies of planetary formation and evolution. High-cadence temporal coverage of the planetary signal combined with extended observations throughout the event allows us to accurately model the observed light curve. The final microlensing solution remains, however, degenerate yielding two possible configurations of the planet and the host star. In the case of the preferred solution, the mass of the planet is $M_{\rm p}$ = 1.0 $\pm$ 0.3 $M_{\rm J}$, and the planet is orbiting a star with a mass $M$ = 0.23 $\pm$ 0.07 $M_\odot$.The second possible configuration (2\sigma away) consists of a planet with $M_{\rm p}$ = 0.6 $\pm$ 0.2 $M_{\rm J}$ and host star with $M$ = 0.15 $\pm$0.06 $M_{\odot}$. The system is located in the Galactic disk 3-4 kpc towards the Galactic bulge. In both cases, with an orbit size of 2 AU, the planet is a "cold Jupiter" -- located well beyond the "snow line" of the host star. Currently available data make the secure selection of the correct solution difficult, but there are prospects for lifting the degeneracy with additional follow-up observations in the future, when the lens and source star separate.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: We reanalyze microlensing events in the published list of anomalous events that were observed from the OGLE lensing survey conducted during 2004-2008 period. In order to check the existence of possible degenerate solutions and extract extra information, we conduct analyses based on combined data from other survey and follow-up observation and consider higher-order effects. Among the analyzed events, we present analyses of 8 events for which either new solutions are identified or additional information is obtained. We find that the previous binary-source interpretations of 5 events are better interpreted by binary-lens models. These events include OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2007-BLG-159, OGLE-2007-BLG-491, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, and OGLE-2008-BLG-210. With additional data covering caustic crossings, we detect finite-source effects for 6 events including OGLE-2006-BLG-215, OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2006-BLG-450, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. Among them, we are able to measure the Einstein radii of 3 events for which multi-band data are available. These events are OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. For OGLE-2008-BLG-143, we detect higher-order effect induced by the changes of the observer's position caused by the orbital motion of the Earth around the Sun. In addition, we present degenerate solutions resulting from the known close/wide or ecliptic degeneracy. Finally, we note that the masses of the binary companions of the lenses of OGLE-2006-BLG-450 and OGLE-2008-BLG-210 are in the brown-dwarf regime.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Recently Sumi et al. (2011) reported evidence for a large population of planetary-mass objects (PMOs) that are either unbound or orbit host stars in orbits > 10 AU. Their result was deduced from the statistical distribution of durations of gravitational microlensing events observed by the MOA collaboration during 2006 and 2007. Here we study the feasibility of measuring the mass of an individual PMO through microlensing by examining a particular event, MOA-2011-BLG-274. This event was unusual as the duration was short, the magnification high, the source-size effect large and the angular Einstein radius small. Also, it was intensively monitored from widely separated locations under clear skies at low air masses. Choi et al. (2012) concluded that the lens of the event may have been a PMO but they did not attempt a measurement of its mass. We report here a re-analysis of the event using re-reduced data. We confirm the results of Choi et al. and attempt a measurement of the mass and distance of the lens using the terrestrial parallax effect. Evidence for terrestrial parallax is found at a 3 sigma level of confidence. The best fit to the data yields the mass and distance of the lens as 0.80 +/- 0.30 M_J and 0.80 +/- 0.25 kpc respectively. We exclude a host star to the lens out to a separation ~ 40 AU. Drawing on our analysis of MOA-2011-BLG-274 we propose observational strategies for future microlensing surveys to yield sharper results on PMOs including those down to super-Earth mass.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: We present a Subaru/Infrared Camera and Spectrograph H-band image of the edge-on debris disk around the F2V star HD 15115. We detected the debris disk, which has a bow shape and an asymmetric surface brightness, at a projected separation of 1′′–3′′ (∼ 50–150 au). The disk surface brightness is ∼ 0.5–1.5 mag brighter on the western side than on the eastern side. We use an inclined annulus disk model to probe the disk geometry. The model fitting suggests that the disk has an inner hole with a radius of 86 au and an eccentricity of 0.06. The disk model also indicates that the amount of dust on the western side is 2.2 times larger than that on the eastern side. A several Jupiter-mass planet may exist at ≳ 45 au and capture grains at the Lagrangian points to open the eccentric gap. This scenario can explain both the eccentric gap and the difference in the amount of dust. In case of the stellar age of several 100 Myr, a dramatic planetesimal collision possibly causes the dust to increase in the western side. Interstellar medium interaction is also considered as a possible explanation of the asymmetric surface brightness, however, it hardly affects large grains in the vicinity of the inner hole.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2014 · Publications- Astronomical Society of Japan
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    ABSTRACT: We present microlens parallax measurements for 21 (apparently) isolated lenses observed toward the Galactic bulge that were imaged simultaneously from Earth and Spitzer, which was ~1 AU West of Earth in projection. We combine these measurements with a kinematic model of the Galaxy to derive distance estimates for each lens, with error bars that are small compared to the Sun's Galactocentric distance. The ensemble therefore yields a well-defined cumulative distribution of lens distances. In principle it is possible to compare this distribution against a set of planets detected in the same experiment in order to measure the Galactic distribution of planets. Since these Spitzer observations yielded only one planet, this is not yet possible in practice. However, it will become possible as larger samples are accumulated.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: The mass of the lenses giving rise to Galactic microlensing events can be constrained by measuring the relative lens-source proper motion and lens flux. The flux of the lens can be separated from that of the source, companions to the source, and unrelated nearby stars with high-resolution images taken when the lens and source are spatially resolved. For typical ground-based adaptive optics (AO) or space-based observations, this requires either inordinately long time baselines or high relative proper motions. We provide a list of microlensing events toward the Galactic Bulge with high relative lens-source proper motion that are therefore good candidates for constraining the lens mass with future high-resolution imaging. We investigate all events from 2004 -- 2013 that display detectable finite-source effects, a feature that allows us to measure the proper motion. In total, we present 20 events with mu >~ 8 mas/yr. Of these, 14 were culled from previous analyses while 6 are new, including OGLE-2004-BLG-368, MOA-2005-BLG-36, OGLE-2012-BLG-0211, OGLE-2012-BLG-0456, MOA-2012-BLG-532, and MOA-2013-BLG-029. In <~12 years the lens and source of each event will be sufficiently separated for ground-based telescopes with AO systems or space telescopes to resolve each component and further characterize the lens system. Furthermore, for the most recent events, comparison of the lens flux estimates from images taken immediately to those estimated from images taken when the lens and source are resolved can be used to empirically check the robustness of the single-epoch method currently being used to estimate lens masses for many events.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · The Astrophysical Journal

Publication Stats

3k Citations
741.24 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010-2015
    • Osaka University
      • Department of Earth and Space Science
      Suika, Ōsaka, Japan
  • 2013-2014
    • University of Warsaw
      Warszawa, Masovian Voivodeship, Poland
    • National Astronomical Observatory of Japan
      • Okayama Astrophysical Observatory
      Edo, Tokyo, Japan
  • 2000-2013
    • Nagoya University
      • Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory
      Nagoya, Aichi, Japan
  • 2002-2008
    • Princeton University
      • Department of Astrophysical Sciences
      Princeton, NJ, United States
  • 2005
    • University of Hamburg
      Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany