Tomoko Oeda

Kyoto City Hospital, Kioto, Kyōto, Japan

Are you Tomoko Oeda?

Claim your profile

Publications (26)76.88 Total impact

  • Hideyuki Sawada · Tomoko Oeda · Kenji Yamamoto
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Parkinson's disease is the second most prevalent disease of the brain. It is characterized by midbrain dopaminergic neuronal degeneration accompanied by Lewy bodies, intra-cytoplasmic neuronal inclusions that consist mainly of alpha-synuclein. The cardinal motor features are muscular rigidity, bradykinesia, and resting tremor and, in advanced cases, postural instability. Symptoms are relieved by dopamine replacement therapy, but progress slowly. Clinical diagnosis is made according to medical history, neurological examinations and the response to anti-Parkinsonian drugs. There are no laboratory tests for diagnosis of the disease; however, for development of disease-modifying treatment, early diagnosis by objective laboratory test is required. Recently, postsynaptic sympathetic norepinephrine nerve terminals were found to be degenerated as well as mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. Cardiac norepinephrine denervation can be seen by meta-iodine-benzyl guanidine scintigraphy, and may be a reliable diagnostic marker. Degeneration of norepinephrinergic and dopaminergic neurons suggests that catecholamines may play a central role in the neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. Recently several studies showed that alpha-synuclein aggregates in cells exposed to dopamine. Here, we review findings relating to an early diagnostic marker for detecting degeneration of the peripheral sympathetic nerves, and propose the hypothesis that catecholamines cause alpha-synuclein to aggregate and play an important role in disease pathogenesis.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Homozygous mutations of the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA) cause Gaucher disease (GD), and heterozygous mutations of GBA are a major risk factor for Parkinson's disease (PD). This study examined the impact of GBA mutations on the longitudinal clinical course of PD patients by retrospective cohort design. GBA-coding regions were fully sequenced in 215 PD patients and GD-associated GBA mutations were identified in 19 (8.8%) PD patients. In a retrospective cohort study, time to develop dementia, psychosis, wearing-off, and dyskinesia were examined. Survival time analysis followed a maximum 12-year observation (median 6.0 years), revealing that PD patients with GD-associated mutations developed dementia and psychosis significantly earlier than those without mutations (p < 0.001 and p = 0.017, respectively). Adjusted hazard ratios of GBA mutations were 8.3 for dementia (p < 0.001) and 3.1 for psychosis (p = 0.002). No statistically significant differences were observed for wearing-off and dyskinesia between the groups. N-isopropyl-p[(123)I] iodoamphetamine single-photon emission tomography pixel-by-pixel analysis revealed that regional cerebral blood flow was reduced in the bilateral parietal cortex, including the precuneus of GD-associated mutant PD patients, compared with matched PD controls without mutations.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Neurobiology of aging
  • Source

    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2015
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: C-reactive protein (CRP), a blood inflammatory biomarker, is associated with the development of Alzheimer disease. In animal models of Parkinson disease (PD), systemic inflammatory stimuli can promote neuroinflammation and accelerate dopaminergic neurodegeneration. However, the association between long-term systemic inflammations and neurodegeneration has not been assessed in PD patients. Objective: To investigate the longitudinal effects of baseline CRP concentrations on motor prognosis in PD. Design, setting, and participants: Retrospective analysis of 375 patients (mean age, 69.3 years; mean PD duration, 6.6 years). Plasma concentrations of high-sensitivity CRP were measured in the absence of infections, and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part III (UPDRS-III) scores were measured at five follow-up intervals (Days 1-90, 91-270, 271-450, 451-630, and 631-900). Main outcome measure: Change of UPDRS-III scores from baseline to each of the five follow-up periods. Results: Change in UPDRS-III scores was significantly greater in PD patients with CRP concentrations ≥0.7 mg/L than in those with CRP concentrations <0.7 mg/L, as determined by a generalized estimation equation model (P = 0.021) for the entire follow-up period and by a generalized regression model (P = 0.030) for the last follow-up interval (Days 631-900). The regression coefficients of baseline CRP for the two periods were 1.41 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.21-2.61) and 2.62 (95% CI 0.25-4.98), respectively, after adjusting for sex, age, baseline UPDRS-III score, dementia, and incremental L-dopa equivalent dose. Conclusion: Baseline plasma CRP levels were associated with motor deterioration and predicted motor prognosis in patients with PD. These associations were independent of sex, age, PD severity, dementia, and anti-Parkinsonian agents, suggesting that subclinical systemic inflammations could accelerate neurodegeneration in PD.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · PLoS ONE
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Introduction: Although aspiration pneumonia is the most common complication of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), the clinical impact of aspiration pneumonia on disease course and survival has not been fully estimated. Thus, we retrospectively analyzed the prognostic factors and clinical consequences of pneumonia in PSP. Methods: The clinical course of patients with aspiration pneumonia was surveyed. The association between baseline clinical features (2 years from disease onset) and latency to the initial development of pneumonia was investigated using survival time and Cox regression analyses. Results: Ninety patients with a clinical diagnosis of PSP were observed for 5.1±3.8 years (mean±SD), and 22 had aspiration pneumonia. Subsequently, 20 patients (91%) had to discontinue oral feeding entirely and 13 (59%) died, whereas, of 68 patients without pneumonia, only three patients (4%) died. Time to initial development of pneumonia was strongly correlated with survival time (Spearman R = 0.92, P<0.001), with a mean latency of 2.3 years to death. Among baseline clinical features, early fall episodes and cognitive decline were significant predictors of pneumonia (P = 0.001 and P<0.001, respectively, log rank test). Cox regression analysis demonstrated that early fall episodes (adjusted hazard ratio: 3.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-12.5, P = 0.03) and cognitive decline (adjusted hazard ratio: 5.2, 95% confidence interval: 1.4-19.3, P = 0.02) independently predicted pneumonia. By contrast, dysphagia was not associated with pneumonia (P = 0.2, log rank test). Conclusion: Initial development of pneumonia indicates an unfavorable clinical course and predicts survival time (mean survival time 2.3 years). Patients with early falls and cognitive decline were at high risk of early development of pneumonia.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2015 · PLoS ONE
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) is a biomarker of inflammation, and high levels of CRP correlate with vascular death. Chronic inflammation is considered to be involved in neurodegeneration, although there is no evidence linking it with the process of neurodegenerative diseases. Objective: To determine the role of baseline CRP levels in the prognosis of patients with Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: A cohort of 313 patients with a mean age of 69.1 and mean PD duration of 7.9 years was retrospectively followed for a mean observation time of 1,753 days. CRP was measured when patients were not diagnosed with any infections, and levels were repetitively measured to investigate a tendency of "regression to mean." The primary outcome measure was a survival time from study enrollment to death. Results: During the observation period 56 patients died. Baseline CRP was log-linearly associated with a risk of death in PD. Mean survival time was 3,149 (95% confidence interval; 3,009-3,289) days in patients with CRP ≤ 0.8mg/L (lower two thirds) and 2,620 (2,343-2,897) days in those with CRP > 0.8 mg/L (top third, p < 0.001, log-rank test). The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) per two-fold higher CRP concentration for all deaths was 1.29 (1.10-1.52), and after excluding PD-unrelated deaths, such as cancer or stroke, HR was 1.23 (1.01-1.49) (adjusted for age, sex, PD duration, modified Hohen-Yahr stages, MMSE scores, and serum albumin). Conclusions: Baseline CRP concentrations were associated with the risk of death and predicted life prognosis of patients with PD. The associations were independent from PD duration, PD severity, cognitive function, ages, and nutritional conditions, suggesting the possibility that subclinical chronic inflammation is associated with a neurodegenerative process in PD.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · PLoS ONE
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We report a case of a 57-year-old woman with thymoma-associated generalized myasthenia gravis (MG) showing severe bulbar and respiratory symptoms, moderate weakness of the neck muscles, and mild weakness of extremity muscles. Corticosteroid treatment with various types of immunosuppressive agents, such as cyclosporine, tacrolimus, and azathioprine, did not improve her symptoms. Plasma exchange transiently improved her symptoms, and she was required to undergo plasmapheresis every 4 weeks. At first, cyclophosphamide pulse therapy was administered, which improved her symptoms transiently. Thereafter, rituximab (RTX) was administered. Six months after RTX administration, respiratory distress and dysphagia improved gradually, and reduction in the dosage of corticosteroids from 30 mg/day to 10 mg/day did not result in symptom deterioration. Therefore, the interval between successive plasmapheresis treatments was increased from 4 to 9 weeks 19 months after the first RTX administration. During a 26-month period from the first administration of RTX, the number of CD20+ B cells in peripheral blood decreased and remained at 0% to 26% of that before RTX treatment. The titer of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies did not change during the first course of treatment (0.6-0.9 nmol/l). The clinical symptom worsened with the increase of the number of CD20+ B cells in peripheral blood in the 27 month after 1st RTX administration. Therefore, RTX was administered a second time, after which the patient's clinical symptoms again improved gradually. The titer of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies came to be stable with 0.5-0.7 nmol and low level during the 2nd course. Corticosteroids could be discontinued in the 16th month. The findings suggest that RTX can be one of the choices for pharmacological therapy in patients with intractable MG accompanied by the presence of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2015
  • Source
    Atsushi Umemura · Tomoko Oeda · Hideyuki Sawada
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Transient myoclonic state with asterixis (TMA) is characterized by sudden onset generalized myoclonus and asterixis without consciousness impairment. Electrophysiological studies have revealed that myoclonus correlates with cortical hyperexcitability localized in the primary motor cortex during the symptomatic period. However, it is unclear whether this excitability remains in the asymptomatic period. Here, we report a 79-year-old Japanese man who presented with TMA. He had been diagnosed with progressive non-fluent aphasia (PNFA) and he suffered from rhythmic myoclonus; predominantly in the neck, shoulders and upper extremities. Asterixis was observed in the forearms. Brain 123I-iodoamphetamine single-photon emission computed tomography showed focal hyperperfusion in the bilateral precentral gyri even at 3 months after remission of the myoclonus. These data suggest that cortical hyperactivity was persistent without symptoms and led to TMA, which could have been due to the underlying neurodegenerative disorder of PNFA.This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2014
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In Parkinson disease (PD), systemic inflammation caused by respiratory infections such as pneumonia frequently occurs, often resulting in delirium in the advanced stages of this disease. Delirium can lead to cognitive and functional decline, institutionalization, and mortality, especially in the elderly. Inflammation causes rapid worsening of PD motor symptoms and signs, sometimes irreversibly in some, but not all, patients.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · PLoS ONE
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Though infections are associated with psychotic symptoms, whether or not subclinical inflammation is associated with hallucinations is not known in Parkinson's disease (PD). To investigate the association of illusions/hallucinations and plasma CRP levels in PD patients without symptomatic infections. PD patients not diagnosed as having infections were assessed for illusions and hallucinations using the Parkinson Psychosis Questionnaire (PPQ). It comprises four-domain questions: PPQ-A for sleep problems, PPQ-B for hallucinations/illusions, PPQ-C for delusions, and PPQ-D for disorientation. Assigning patients with ≥1 points in the PPQ-B score to be cases and others as controls, the association of hallucinations/illusions and clinical features (age, sex, duration of PD, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part 3 (UPDRS-3), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score, sleep disturbance (PPQ-A score) as well as daily doses of L-Dopa, dopamine agonists, amantadine, and selegiline) were analyzed using a case-control design. A total of 111 patients were examined and plasma CRP levels were <0.1-6.0 mg/L. Hallucinations or illusions were detected in 28 (25.2%). There were significant differences in age, UPDRS-3 score, MMSE score, PPQ-A, daily doses of L-Dopa and dopamine agonists and plasma CRP levels between cases and controls. A multivariate logistic regression model revealed that UPDRS-3 scores and plasma CRP levels were significantly associated with hallucinations/illusions with an adjusted odds ratio of 1.96 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20-3.20) per 10 points and 1.57 (95% confidence interval 1.13-2.16) per two-fold, respectively. Dividing patients into thirds by CRP levels (≤0.2, 0.3-0.6, ≥0.7 mg/L), the prevalence of hallucinations/illusions was 13.2%, 21.6%, and 41.7%, in the bottom-, middle-, and top-thirds, respectively (for trend p = 0.012). Subclinical elevation of plasma CRP levels was associated with hallucinations or illusions after adjustment for motor disability, suggesting that subclinical elevations of CRP levels might be an independent risk for hallucinations/illusions.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · PLoS ONE
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to compare the features of joint angle and muscle activity of standing up movement from a chair in PD (Parkinson&apos;s disease) patients and healthy individuals, for design of the chairs assisting standing up movement of PD patients. Twelve PD patients and 12 healthy individuals participated in this study. We measured the joint angle and muscle activity (electromyogram) in the lower limbs, and the ground reaction force during standing up movement from an armchair. In terms of the timing of change of the joint angle and the working joint angle, no significant difference was found between the PD patients and healthy individuals. However, the timing of PD patients in the movement from the start point of the rectus femoris to the start point of the tibialis anterior was significantly shorter than that of the healthy individuals. These results show that PD patients have specific features of muscle activities in standing up movement from a chair.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2014

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2014
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Abnormal posture (AP) is often seen in Parkinson's disease (PD), and marked forms known as dropped head syndrome and camptocormia encumber daily living activities. Unlike other motor disabilities such as bradykinesia or muscular rigidity, AP is not always improved but rather deteriorated by PD medication. To clarify factors associated with neck and thoracolumbar AP. Neck flexion (NF) and thoracolumbar (TL) angles were measured in 216 consecutive PD patients and 175 elderly healthy controls. The differences in NF and TL angles between PD patients and controls were designated as ΔNFA and ΔTLA, respectively. The association of ΔNFA or ΔTLA and predictable factors such as age, sex, duration of PD, Hoehn Yahr (H-Y) stage, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale Part 3 (UPDRS-3), daily dose of dopamine agonists, and comorbid orthopedic spinal lesions was investigated in PD patients. Patients were divided into quartiles according to ΔNFA or ΔTLA. The association between predictable factors and ΔNFA or ΔTLA was estimated as odds ratio (OR), comparing with the lowest quartile as the reference by multivariate regression analysis. Compared with controls, distributions of all three posture angles were significantly shifted rightward in PD patients. Although there were no difference in UPDRS-3 scores in the quartiles of ΔNFA, the highest quartile was associated with H-Y stage ≥3 [OR 2.99, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.33-6.70, p = 0.008] after adjustment for age, sex and comorbid orthopedic spinal lesions. The highest quartile of ΔTLA was associated with comorbid orthopedic spinal lesions [OR 5.83 (1.42-23.8), p = 0.014], and UPDRS-3 score [OR 3.04 (1.80-5.15)/10 points, p<0.0001]. Thoraco-lumbar AP was associated with UPDRS-3 scores and orthopedic spinal lesions, and in contrast, neck AP was not associated with these factors, suggesting that they had different pathomechanisms.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · PLoS ONE
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Psychoses such as hallucinations are a frequent non-motor problem in patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and serious psychosis requires anti-psychotic medications that worsen Parkinsonism. Although psychosis could be associated with patient-related or biological factors such as cognition, age, and severity of PD, it can also be associated with medications.Therefore we aimed to investigate patient-related and medication-related risks of psychosis requiring anti-psychotic medications (serious psychosis). A retrospective cohort of 331 PD patients was followed for 2 years. Patient-related factors associated with risk of psychosis were identified by a survival time analysis. In patients who developed psychosis, medications during the hazard period (1-14 days before psychosis) were contrasted with those during the control periods (1 and 3 months before psychosis) using a case--crossover analysis to identify medication-related risks of psychosis. Serious psychosis was detected in 52 patients and the incidence was estimated to be 116 (95% confidence interval [CI], 85-148) per 1,000 person-years. Analyses of baseline characteristics revealed the risk to be higher in patients with a modified Hoehn--Yahr stage of >=4 (hazard ratio [HR], 2.22; 95% CI, 1.11-4.40), those with a longer duration of PD (HR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.00-1.55, per 5 years) and those with Mini-Mental State Examination scores of <=24 (HR, 2.66; 95% CI, 1.37-5.16). The case-crossover analysis revealed that anti-cholinergics use (HR, 19.7; 95% CI, 2.39-162) elevated the risk, while donepezil use reduced it (HR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.27-0.85). Risk of psychosis was elevated by increasing severity of PD, cognitive dysfunction and duration of the disease. It was elevated by use of anti-cholinergic drugs and reduced by use of donepezil. The medication-related risk was higher in patients aged >= 70 years. In contrast, there was no significant medication-related risk in younger patients, suggesting different pathomechanisms between young and old patients.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2013 · BMC Neurology
  • Source
    Hideyuki Sawada · Tomoko Oeda
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Psychosis, including hallucinations and delusions, is one of the important non-motor problems in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and is possibly associated with cholinergic neuronal degeneration. The EDAP (Efficacy of Donepezil against Psychosis in PD) study will evaluate the efficacy of donepezil, a brain acetylcholine esterase inhibitor, for prevention of psychosis in PD. Psychosis is assessed every 4 weeks using the Parkinson Psychosis Questionnaire (PPQ) and patients with PD whose PPQ-B score (hallucinations) and PPQ-C score (delusions) have been zero for 8 weeks before enrolment are randomised to two arms: patients receiving donepezil hydrochloride or patients receiving placebo. The patients are then followed for 96 weeks. The primary outcome measure is the time to the event, defined as getting 2 points or more on the PPQ-B score or PPQ-C score, which is assessed using a survival time analysis. The hypothesis being tested is that donepezil prevents psychosis in patients with PD. Efficacy will be tested statistically using the intention-to-treat analysis including a log-rank test or Cox proportional hazard models. Secondary outcomes, such as changes of PPQ scores and Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale scores from baseline will be assessed. Ethics approval was received from the Central Review Board of the National Hospital Organization, Tokyo, Japan. The trial was declared and registered to the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency(PMDA), Japan (No. 22-4018). All participants will receive a written informed consent that was approved by the Central Review. A completed written informed consent is required to enrol in the study. Severe adverse events will be monitored by investigators and in cases where a severe adverse event was previously unreported, it will be reported to the PMDA. UMIN000005403.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · BMJ Open
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: It is often hard to differentiate Parkinson's disease (PD) and parkinsonian variant of multiple system atrophy (MSA-P), especially in the early stages. Cardiac sympathetic denervation and putaminal rarefaction are specific findings for PD and MSA-P, respectively. We investigated diagnostic accuracy of putaminal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) test for MSA-P and (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigram for PD, especially in early-stage patients. The referral standard diagnosis of PD and MSA-P were the diagnostic criteria of the United Kingdom Parkinson's Disease Society Brain Bank Criteria and the second consensus criteria, respectively. Based on the referral standard criteria, diagnostic accuracy [area under the receiver-operator characteristic curve (AUC), sensitivity and specificity] of the ADC and MIBG tests was estimated retrospectively. Diagnostic accuracy of these tests performed within 3 years of symptom onset was also investigated. ADC and MIBG tests were performed on 138 patients (20 MSA and 118 PD). AUC was 0.95 and 0.83 for the ADC and MIBG tests, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity were 85.0% and 89.0% for MSA-P diagnosis by ADC test and 67.0% and 80.0% for PD diagnosis by MIBG test. When these tests were restricted to patients with disease duration ≤3 years, the sensitivity and specificity were 75.0% and 91.4% for the ADC test (MSA-P diagnosis) and 47.7% and 92.3% for the MIBG test (PD diagnosis). Both tests were useful in differentiating between PD and MSA-P, even in the early stages. In early-stage patients, elevated putaminal ADC was a diagnostic marker for MSA-P. Despite high specificity of the MIBG test, careful neurological history and examinations were required for PD diagnosis because of possible false-negative results.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2013 · PLoS ONE
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Dyskinesias are some of the major motor complications that impair quality of life for patients with Parkinson's disease. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the efficacy of amantadine in Parkinson's disease patients suffering from dyskinesias. In this multi-center, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over trial, 36 patients with Parkinson's disease and dyskinesias were randomized, and 62 interventions, which included amantadine (300 mg/day) or placebo treatment for 27 days, were analyzed. At 15 days after washout, the treatments were crossed over. The primary outcome measure was the changes in the Rush Dyskinesia Rating Scale (RDRS) during each treatment period. The secondary outcome measures were changes in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part IVa (UPDRS-IVa, dyskinesias), part IVb (motor fluctuations), and part III (motor function). RDRS improved in 64% and 16% of patients treated with amantadine or placebo, respectively, with significant differences between treatments. The adjusted odds-ratio for improvement by amantadine was 6.7 (95% confidence interval, 1.4 to 31.5). UPDRS-IVa was improved to a significantly greater degree in amantadine-treated patients [mean (SD) of 1.83 (1.56)] compared with placebo-treated patients [0.03 (1.51)]. However, there were no significant effects on UPDRS-IVb or III scores. Results from the present study demonstrated that amantadine exhibited efficacious effects against dyskinesias in 60-70% of patients. UMIN Clinical Trial Registry UMIN000000780.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2010 · PLoS ONE
  • H. Sawada · T. Oeda · K. Yamamoto

    No preview · Article · Feb 2010 · European Journal of Neurology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To estimate the diagnostic accuracy of cardiac (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigram for detection of Parkinson disease. A cross-sectional study with index test of MIBG scintigram and reference standard of U.K. Parkinson's Disease Brain Bank Criteria was performed in 403 patients. Ratio of cardiac-to-mediastinum MIBG accumulation was determined at 20 min (early H/M) and 4 h (late H/M). Area under the receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) curve, sensitivity and specificity in detecting Parkinson disease were analyzed. Accuracy was analyzed in a subgroup of patients with disease duration of 3 years or less. Area under the ROC curve was 0.89 using either early or late H/M as a diagnostic marker (95% CI 0.85-0.92 for early H/M and 0.86-0.93 for late H/M). Sensitivity and specificity were 81.3% (76.1-85.8%) and 85.0% (77.7-90.6%) for early H/M and 84.3% (79.3-88.4%) and 89.5% (83.01-94.1%) for late H/M. In the subgroup with duration of 3 years or less, the ROC curve area, sensitivity, and specificity were 0.86 (0.79-0.92), 76.0% (64.8-85.1%), and 83.9% (71.7-92.4%) for early H/M and 0.85 (0.78-0.92), 73.3% (61.9-82.9%), and 87.5% (75.9-94.8%) for late H/M. Although diagnostic accuracy of cardiac MIBG scintigram is high, it is limited because of insufficient sensitivity in patients with short duration.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2009 · European Journal of Neurology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An association between ergot-derived dopamine agonists and asymptomatic valvular heart disease in Parkinson's disease has been established. For safe use of these agonists, it is important to specify those at high risk for valvular heart disease among patients with Parkinson's disease. We performed a nested case-control study of 223 patients with Parkinson's disease. In results of multivariable logistic analyses, use of pergolide, use of cabergoline, age, male sex, and hypertension were independent significant risk factors for left-sided valvular regurgitation. In patients receiving cabergoline or pergolide, elderly (>or=70 years) hypertensive patients had a markedly high risk for valvular regurgitation (odds ratio 94.5) as compared to non-elderly (<70 years) patients without hypertension. The risk of valvular regurgitation caused by pergolide or cabergoline was found to be highly enhanced by comorbid hypertension or aging, suggesting that special attention should be paid when prescribing cabergoline or pergolide for those patients.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2008 · Journal of Neural Transmission

Publication Stats

238 Citations
76.88 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010
    • Kyoto City Hospital
      Kioto, Kyōto, Japan
  • 2001
    • Kyoto University
      • Department of Neurology
      Kioto, Kyōto, Japan