S Koifman

Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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Publications (63)260.68 Total impact

  • Carmen Freire · Koifman RJ · Sergio Koifman
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of hematological and hepatic alterations and possible association with serum levels of beta-hexachlorocyclohexane (beta-HCH), p,p′-DDE, and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) among residents in an area heavily contaminated with organochlorine (OC) pesticides. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 415 male and 432 female residents aged >14 years. Serum samples were collected and analyzed for OC pesticides concentrations and biochemical parameters. Frequencies of hematological and hepatic alterations were calculated for each gender. Association between beta-HCH, p,p′-DDE (1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethylene), and HCB levels and presence of alterations was determined by logistic regression stratified by gender and controlling for confounders. Highest frequencies were observed for eosinophilia (23% men and 18% women), low hemoglobin (12% men and 15% women), and low erythrocyte count (12% men). High levels of bilirubin, glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) were observed, respectively, in 10, 11, and 12% of men and
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health
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    ABSTRACT: Worldwide data for cancer survival are scarce. We aimed to initiate worldwide surveillance of cancer survival by central analysis of population-based registry data, as a metric of the effectiveness of health systems, and to inform global policy on cancer control. Individual tumour records were submitted by 279 population-based cancer registries in 67 countries for 25·7 million adults (age 15-99 years) and 75 000 children (age 0-14 years) diagnosed with cancer during 1995-2009 and followed up to Dec 31, 2009, or later. We looked at cancers of the stomach, colon, rectum, liver, lung, breast (women), cervix, ovary, and prostate in adults, and adult and childhood leukaemia. Standardised quality control procedures were applied; errors were corrected by the registry concerned. We estimated 5-year net survival, adjusted for background mortality in every country or region by age (single year), sex, and calendar year, and by race or ethnic origin in some countries. Estimates were age-standardised with the International Cancer Survival Standard weights. 5-year survival from colon, rectal, and breast cancers has increased steadily in most developed countries. For patients diagnosed during 2005-09, survival for colon and rectal cancer reached 60% or more in 22 countries around the world; for breast cancer, 5-year survival rose to 85% or higher in 17 countries worldwide. Liver and lung cancer remain lethal in all nations: for both cancers, 5-year survival is below 20% everywhere in Europe, in the range 15-19% in North America, and as low as 7-9% in Mongolia and Thailand. Striking rises in 5-year survival from prostate cancer have occurred in many countries: survival rose by 10-20% between 1995-99 and 2005-09 in 22 countries in South America, Asia, and Europe, but survival still varies widely around the world, from less than 60% in Bulgaria and Thailand to 95% or more in Brazil, Puerto Rico, and the USA. For cervical cancer, national estimates of 5-year survival range from less than 50% to more than 70%; regional variations are much wider, and improvements between 1995-99 and 2005-09 have generally been slight. For women diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2005-09, 5-year survival was 40% or higher only in Ecuador, the USA, and 17 countries in Asia and Europe. 5-year survival for stomach cancer in 2005-09 was high (54-58%) in Japan and South Korea, compared with less than 40% in other countries. By contrast, 5-year survival from adult leukaemia in Japan and South Korea (18-23%) is lower than in most other countries. 5-year survival from childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia is less than 60% in several countries, but as high as 90% in Canada and four European countries, which suggests major deficiencies in the management of a largely curable disease. International comparison of survival trends reveals very wide differences that are likely to be attributable to differences in access to early diagnosis and optimum treatment. Continuous worldwide surveillance of cancer survival should become an indispensable source of information for cancer patients and researchers and a stimulus for politicians to improve health policy and health-care systems. Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (Toronto, Canada), Cancer Focus Northern Ireland (Belfast, UK), Cancer Institute New South Wales (Sydney, Australia), Cancer Research UK (London, UK), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Atlanta, GA, USA), Swiss Re (London, UK), Swiss Cancer Research foundation (Bern, Switzerland), Swiss Cancer League (Bern, Switzerland), and University of Kentucky (Lexington, KY, USA). Copyright © 2014 Allemani et al. Open Access article distributed under the terms of CC BY. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · The Lancet
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: To assess the cognitive performance of children and adolescents living in an area contaminated with organochloride (OC) pesticides and factors associated with exposure. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted with 102 individuals aged between 6 and 16 years living in Cidade dos Meninos, in the Brazilian State of Rio de Janeiro, between 2012 and 2013. A subsample of 46 of these children had serum concentrations of OC pesticides and thyroid hormones determined between 2003 and 2004. Information on place of residence of the mother and duration of breastfeeding were provided for all participants. Cognitive performance was assessed using the WISC-III scale. Multivariate regression was employed to investigate associations. Results: At least 40% of the children presented with below average intelligence (IQ<90) in six cognitive categories. Executive function was the lowest score. Place of residence of the mother and duration of breastfeeding were not associated with cognition, except for the executive function. Levels of alphahexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) were associated with a reduction of 0.45, 0.33 and 0.46 points in the areas of execution, resistance to distraction (RD) and processing speed (PS), respectively; gamma-HCH was associated with a reduction of 1.74 points in RD and 1.84 points in PS; and p,p’-DDT (dichlorodiphenyl- trichloroethane) was associated with a lower score (-0.81) in PS. A slight inverse association was found between levels of total triiodothyronine and perceptual organization. Conclusions: The results suggest that chronic exposure to OC pesticides may have led to cognitive deficiencies in these children and adolescents. © 2015 Instituto Materno Infantil Professor Fernando Figueira. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Revista Brasileira de Saúde Materno Infantil
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: It was to describe the pattern of mortality from central nervous system tumors in children and adolescents in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 1980-2009. METHODS: Mortality data were extracted from the Mortality Information System. Crude, sex-specific and age-specific mortality rates were calculated. For trend analyses, we used polynomial regression models and the estimated annual percent change RESULTS: Between 1980 and 2009, CNS tumors accounted for 23% of total deaths from cancer in Rio de Janeiro in individuals with less than 20 years. Of these deaths, 54.7% were in males, 90.8% had tumor located in the brain and 87.7% were malignant. Over this period, mortality decreased 1.5% annually. The highest rate was 2.25/100,000, in 1984, and the lowest was 0.68/100,000, in 2008 CONCLUSION: The CNS tumors in children and adolescents currently represent a public health problem in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro, despite the decrease in mortality observed during the study period. To assess whether the decrease in mortality was due to the tumor incidence reduction or treatment improvement, further research is needed to explore the factors associated to brain cancer development, diagnosis and therapeutic results.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Acute leukemia is the most common cancer in children under 15 years of age; 80% are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 17% are acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Childhood leukemia shows further diversity based on cytogenetic and molecular characteristics, which may relate to distinct etiologies. Case-control studies conducted worldwide, particularly of ALL, have collected a wealth of data on potential risk factors and in some studies, biospecimens. There is growing evidence for the role of infectious/immunologic factors, fetal growth, and several environmental factors in the etiology of childhood ALL. The risk of childhood leukemia, like other complex diseases, is likely to be influenced both by independent and interactive effects of genes and environmental exposures. While some studies have analyzed the role of genetic variants, few have been sufficiently powered to investigate gene-environment interactions. Objectives: The Childhood Leukemia International Consortium (CLIC) was established in 2007 to promote investigations of rarer exposures, gene-environment interactions and subtype-specific associations through the pooling of data from independent studies. Methods: By September 2012, CLIC included 22 studies (recruitment period: 1962-present) from 12 countries, totaling approximately 31000 cases and 50000 controls. Of these, 19 case-control studies have collected detailed epidemiologic data, and DNA samples have been collected from children and child-parent trios in 15 and 13 of these studies, respectively. Two registry-based studies and one study comprising hospital records routinely obtained at birth and/or diagnosis have limited interview data or biospecimens. Conclusions: CLIC provides a unique opportunity to fill gaps in knowledge about the role of environmental and genetic risk factors, critical windows of exposure, the effects of gene-environment interactions and associations among specific leukemia subtypes in different ethnic groups.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2013
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Cigarette smoking has been associated with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) but hypothesis on the association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and childhood leukemia remains unclear. Objectives: To investigate the association between maternal exposure to tobacco smoking during pregnancy and early age (<2 year) leukemia (EAL). Methods: A hospital-based multicenter case-control study aiming to explore EAL risk factors was carried out in Brazil during 1999-2007. Data were collected by direct interview with the biological mothers using a standardized questionnaire. The present study included 675 children (193 acute lymphoid leukemia - ALL, 59 AML and 423 controls), being the latter age frequency matched and paired by area of residence with the cases. Unconditional logistic regression was performed, and odds ratios (OR) on the association between tobacco smoking (3 months before pregnancy, during pregnancy, and 3 months after delivery) and EAL were ascertained after adjustment for selected variables (maternal age at birth and education, birth weight, infant skin color, and oral contraceptives use during pregnancy). Results: Smoking was reported by 17.5% of case mothers and 20.6% of controls. Among women who reported to have smoked 20 or more cigarettes during the index pregnancy, an adjusted OR = 5.28 (95% CI 1.40-19.95) for ALL was observed. Heavy smoking during breastfeeding yielded an adjusted risk estimate for ALL, OR = 7.78 (95% CI 1.33-45.5). No dose-response effect was observed according to smoking exposure during pregnancy and EAL. An association between secondhand smoking during pregnancy or breastfeeding was not observed. Conclusion: An association between maternal smoking and EAL in the offspring was restricted to women who have reported an intense exposure to tobacco smoke during pregnancy and breastfeeding.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2012 · Frontiers in Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: An association between pesticide exposure and cancer has been suggested. Infant leukemia is a rare neoplasm and its association with maternal pesticide exposure has been poorly explored. Objectives: We investigated the association between pesticide exposure during pregnancy and leukemia in children < 2 years of age. Methods: A hospital-based case–control study was carried out in 13 Brazilian states during 1999–2007. Mothers of 252 cases and those of 423 controls were interviewed. Information on pesticide exposures 3 months before pregnancy, throughout pregnancy, and during breastfeeding was obtained. Unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) for associations between pesticide exposures and leukemia. Results: Associations with ever use of pesticides during pregnancy were observed for acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) (aOR = 2.10; 95% CI: 1.14, 3.86) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (aOR = 5.01; 95% CI: 1.97, 12.7) in children 0–11 months of age, and with ALL (aOR = 1.88; 95% CI: 1.05, 5.23) at 12–23 months of age. According to reported maternal exposure to permethrin, higher risk estimates were verified for children 0–11 months of age (aOR = 2.47; 95% CI: 1.17, 5.25 for ALL; and aOR = 7.28; 95% CI: 2.60, 20.38 for AML). Maternal pesticide exposure related to agricultural activities showed an aOR of 5.25 (95% CI: 1.83, 15.08) for ALL, and an aOR of 7.56 (95% CI: 1.83, 31.23) for AML. Conclusions: These results support the hypothesis that pesticide exposure during pregnancy may be involved in the etiology of acute leukemia in children < 2 years of age.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2012 · Environmental Health Perspectives
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    ABSTRACT: Acute leukemia in early childhood is biologically and clinically distinct. The particular characteristics of this malignancy diagnosed during the first months of life have provided remarkable insights into the etiology of the disease. The pro-B, CD10 negative immunophenotype is typically found in infant acute leukemia, and the most common genetic alterations are the rearrangements of the MLL gene. In addition, the TEL/AML1 fusion gene is most frequently found in children older than 24 months. A molecular study on a Brazilian cohort (age range 0-23 months) has detected TEL/AML1(+ve) (N = 9), E2A/PBX1(+ve) (N = 4), PML/RARA(+ve) (N = 4), and AML1/ETO+ve ( N = 2) cases. Undoubtedly, the great majority of genetic events occurring in these patients arise prenatally. The environmental exposure to damaging agents that give rise to genetic changes prenatally may be accurately determined in infants since the window of exposure is limited and known. Several studies have shown maternal exposures that may give rise to leukemogenic changes. The Brazilian Collaborative Study Group of Infant Acute Leukemia has found that mothers exposed to dipyrone, pesticides and hormones had an increased chance to give birth to babies with infant acute leukemia [OR = 1.48 (95% CI = 1.052.07), OR = 2.27 (95% CI = 1.56-3.31) and OR = 9.08 (95% CI = 2.95-27.96)], respectively. This review aims to summarize recent clues that have facilitated the elucidation of the biology of early childhood leukemias, with emphasis on infant acute leukemia in the Brazilian population.
    Preview · Dataset · Aug 2012
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to determine the contribution of a familial history of cancer (FHC) to the development of leukemia in children below 2 years of age. This is a national hospital-based case-control study of children 0-24 months of age recruited from 15 Brazilian hospitals from several regions providing oncological care and local general hospitals. Participants' FHC antecedents were obtained through face-to-face interviews with the mothers of cases and controls using a standardized questionnaire. Unconditional logistic regression was used to determine crude and adjusted (adj.) odds ratios (OR), and the respective 95% confidence intervals (CI), of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) after adjustment for selected variables. FHC antecedents were obtained from 178 ALL, 51 AML, and 428 controls. FHC in second-degree relatives (grandparents, uncles, cousins) showed an adj. OR=1.66 (95% CI 1.12-2.45) for ALL. Antecedents of two or more relatives with cancer showed a statistically significant two-fold higher risk of either ALL or AML. Paternal, and joint paternal and maternal antecedents of cancer also showed statistically significant higher adj. OR, respectively: 1.80 and 1.89 for ALL, and 2.34 and 3.23 for AML. Hematological malignancies among second-degree relatives showed an adj. OR=3.48 (95% CI 1.72-7.09) for ALL. According to the anatomic site, antecedents of leukemia/lymphoma among case relatives, compared with the control ones, showed an OR=2.98 (95% CI 1.52-5.82) for ALL, whereas stomach cancer antecedents showed an OR=3.55 (95% CI 1.02-12.39) for AML. The observed results support the hypothesis that FHC antecedents are associated with leukemogenesis in children below 2 years of age.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2012 · European journal of cancer prevention: the official journal of the European Cancer Prevention Organisation (ECP)
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    ABSTRACT: This study aims to explore the unapparent relations that several factors related to environmental exposure and individual characteristics existing in our environment may have with the process of developing childhood leukemia. From a database obtained from a clinical and epidemiological hospital-based, case-control study on risk factors for childhood leukemia, an exploratory multivariate analysis was performed using principal component analysis and factor analysis. This research is part of a national multicenter study that included 292 cases of leukemia in children aged 0 to 12 years and 541 controls of the same age, hospitalized for non-neoplastic causes in general hospitals near the centers the cases originated in. Information on selected environmental exposure was obtained in interviews with the mothers of both cases and controls by means of a standardized questionnaire. The model with the greatest explanatory power for the variance observed in the data analyzed was of approximately 52%. Three factors were considered most appropriate for predicting leukemogenesis in childhood, each including variables with factor loadings greater than 0.6: factor "conditions related to chemical exposures during pregnancy", which explained 20% of the final variance and included the variables pesticide exposure, exposure to solvents and paint exposure in pregnancy; factor "lifestyle habits during pregnancy" explained 17% of the variance and included exposure to hair dyes and cosmetics for hair straightening; and factor "use of health services during pregnancy", which explained 15% of the variance and included the variables type of delivery (vaginal or caesarean) and use of radiography in pregnancy. Logistic regression analysis revealed a statistically significant association between the development of leukemia in childhood and maternal history of chemical exposure during pregnancy (OR=1.36, 95% CI=1.16-1.59) and use of health services during pregnancy (OR=1.27, 95% CI=1.08-1.49). The results indicate the joint contribution of not just individual but environmental exposure in the development of leukemia in childhood, and are supported by evidence in the literature that the process of carcinogenesis in general and of leukemogenesis in particular, result from effects of multiple mutations related to joint environmental exposure.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2012 · Revista Brasileira de Estudos de População
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    Carmen Freire · Sergio Koifman
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    ABSTRACT: It has been suggested that exposure to pesticides might be involved in the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). We conducted an updated systematic review of the epidemiologic literature over the past decade on the relationship between pesticide exposure and PD, using the MEDLINE database. Despite methodological differences, a significantly increased PD risk was observed in 13 out of 23 case-control studies that considered overall exposure to pesticides (risk estimates of 1.1-2.4) and in 10 out of 12 studies using other research designs (risk estimates of 2 or higher). Various studies found stronger associations in genetically susceptible individuals. Among a growing number of studies on the effects of exposure to specific pesticides (n=20), an increased PD risk has been associated with insecticides, especially chlorpyrifos and organochlorines, in six studies (odds ratios of 1.8-4.4), and with the herbicide paraquat, the fungicide maneb or the combination of both. Findings considerably strengthen the evidence that exposure to pesticides in well water may contribute to PD, whereas studies of farming and rural residence found inconsistent or little association with the disease. Taken together, this comprehensive set of results suggests that the hypothesis of an association between pesticide exposure and PD cannot be ruled out. However, inadequate data on consistent responses to exposure hinder the establishment of a causal relationship with PD. Given the extensive worldwide use of many pesticides, further studies are warranted in larger populations that include detailed quantitative data on exposure and determination of genetic polymorphisms.
    Preview · Article · May 2012 · NeuroToxicology
  • S. Koifman · GPJ Ortega · RJ Koifman

    No preview · Article · Feb 2012 · Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: Infant Leukaemia is a rare haematological neoplasm associated with MLL gene rearrangements. Maternal exposure during pregnancy to pesticides, hormones, dipyrone, and topoisomerase-II DNA inhibitors and birth weight were associated risk factors. This is a hospital-based multicenter case-control study, and were interviewed mothers of 252 IL cases and of 423 controls. Data were obtained regarding environmental maternal exposure during periconceptional, pregnancy and breast-feeding periods, including exposure to pesticides. Unconditional logistic regression was performed and ORs on the association between maternal pesticides exposure and IL, including their 95% CIs, were ascertained after adjustment to hormonal intake during pregnancy, mother's age, mother's level of education, birth weight and infant's skin colour. An adjusted OR, 2.39, 95% CI 1.63 to 3.51 was observed for the association between IL and maternal exposure to pesticides during pregnancy, being higher for acute myeloid leukaemia (adjusted OR 3.50, 95% CI 2.01 to 6.11). The use of pyrethroids during pregnancy revealed an OR 2.18 (95% CI 1.44 to 3.29), while the use of other pesticides showed an OR 3.61 (95% CI 1.69 to 7.73). The reported household use of pesticides revealed an adjusted OR 2.25 (95% CI 1.48 to 3.43), and agriculture exposure showed an adjusted OR 9.26, (95% CI 2.82 to 30.4). Mixed exposure to different pesticides showed an adjusted OR, 3.83 (95% CI 1.33 to 11.0) and the exposure to different chemical classes revealed an adjusted OR, 8.87 (95% CI 1.55 to 50.6). The observed results seem to support the hypothesis that mothers' household use of pesticides and other contaminants may be involved in the aetiology of infant leukaemia.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2011 · Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health

  • No preview · Article · Aug 2011 · Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health
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    ABSTRACT: Cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract (UADT; including oral cavity, pharynx, larynx and oesophagus) have high incidence rates all over the world, and they are especially frequent in some parts of Latin America. However, the data on the role of the major risk factors in these areas are still limited. We have evaluated the role of alcohol and tobacco consumption, based on 2,252 upper aerodigestive squamous-cell carcinoma cases and 1,707 controls from seven centres in Brazil, Argentina, and Cuba. We show that alcohol drinkers have a risk of UADT cancers that is up to five times higher than that of never-drinkers. A very strong effect of aperitifs and spirits as compared to other alcohol types was observed, with the ORs reaching 12.76 (CI 5.37-30.32) for oesophagus. Tobacco smokers were up to six times more likely to develop aerodigestive cancers than never-smokers, with the ORs reaching 11.14 (7.72-16.08) among current smokers for hypopharynx and larynx cancer. There was a trend for a decrease in risk after quitting alcohol drinking or tobacco smoking for all sites. The interactive effect of alcohol and tobacco was more than multiplicative. In this study, 65% of all UADT cases were attributable to a combined effect of alcohol and tobacco use. In this largest study on UADT cancer in Latin America, we have shown for the first time that a prevailing majority of UADT cancer cases is due to a combined effect of alcohol and tobacco use and could be prevented by quitting the use of either of these two agents.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2011 · Cancer Causes and Control
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    ABSTRACT: Recent studies support an important role for human papillomavirus (HPV) in a subgroup of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). We have evaluated the HPV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) prevalence as well as the association between serological response to HPV infection and HNSCC in two distinct populations from Central Europe (CE) and Latin America (LA). Cases (n = 2214) and controls (n = 3319) were recruited from 1998 to 2003, using a similar protocol including questionnaire and blood sample collection. Tumour DNA from 196 fresh tissue biopsies was analysed for multiple HPV types followed by an HPV type-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol towards the E7 gene from HPV 16. Using multiplex serology, serum samples were analysed for antibodies to 17 HPV types. Statistical analysis included the estimation of adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and the respective 95% confidence intervals (CIs). HPV16 E7 DNA prevalence among cases was 3.1% (6/196), including 4.4% in the oropharynx (3/68), 3.8% in the hypopharynx/larynx (3/78) and 0% among 50 cases of oral cavity carcinomas. Positivity for both HPV16 E6 and E7 antibodies was associated with a very high risk of oropharyngeal cancer (OR = 179, 95% CI 35.8-899) and hypopharyngeal/laryngeal cancer (OR = 14.9, 95% CI 2.92-76.1). A very low prevalence of HPV DNA and serum antibodies was observed among cases in both CE and LA. The proportion of head and neck cancer caused by HPV may vary substantially between different geographical regions and studies that are designed to evaluate the impact of HPV vaccination on HNSCC need to consider this heterogeneity.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2011 · International Journal of Epidemiology

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2011 · Cancer Research
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    ABSTRACT: Maternal exposure to dipyrone during pregnancy has been associated with risk of infant leukemia (IL). N-Acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) enzyme acetylates dipyrone, resulting in a detoxified metabolite. We performed genotyping to identify the distribution of NAT2 polymorphisms in duo samples from mothers and children previously investigated in a case-controlled study of IL. Samples from 132 IL, 131 age-matched controls, mothers of cases (n = 86), and mothers of controls (n = 36) were analyzed. PCR-RFLP assays were used to determine the NAT2 variants 191G>A, 282C>T, 341T>C, 481C>T, 590G>A, 803A>G, and 857G>A. The test for case-control differences in the distribution of genotypes was based on χ(2) statistics. Unconditional logistic regression was used to examine the association between maternal exposure to dipyrone during the index pregnancy, IL, and NAT2 phenotypes. Crude and adjusted odds ratios (OR) are given with the 95% confidence interval (95% CI). NAT2 slow-acetylation haplotypes were associated with IL (OR, 8.90; 95% CI, 1.71-86.7). An association between IL and NAT2 phenotype was observed in IL whether the mothers reported dipyrone exposures (OR, 4.48; 95% CI, 1.88-10.7) or not (OR, 4.27; 95% CI, 1.75-10.5). The combination of NAT2 slow/slow (mother/child) phenotypes confers a higher risk of IL (OR, 30.0; 95% CI, 5.87-279.7). NAT2 slow-acetylation profiles are associated with IL regardless of maternal exposure to dipyrone during pregnancy. Further recommendations about medicine exposures during pregnancy should take into account that infants with the maternal NAT2 slow-acetylation genotypes might be particularly vulnerable to greater risk.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2010 · Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers & Prevention

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2010 · EJC Supplements
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    ABSTRACT: Cancers of the upper aerodigestive tract [(UADT): oral cavity, pharynx, larynx and oesophagus] have high incidence rates in some parts of South America. Alterations in the TP53 gene are common in these cancers. In our study, we have estimated the prevalence and patterns of TP53 mutations (exons 4-10) in 236 UADT tumours from South America in relation to lifestyle risk factors, such as tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking. Moreover, we have conducted a pilot study of EGFR mutations (exons 18-21) in 45 tumours from the same population. TP53 mutation prevalence was high: 59% of tumours were found to carry mutant TP53. We found an association between TP53 mutations and tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking. The mutation rate increased from 38% in never-smokers to 66% in current smokers (P-value for trend 5 0.09). G:C>T:A transversions were found only in smokers (15%). Alcohol drinkers carried more G:C>A:T transitions (P 5 0.08). Non-exposed individuals were more probable to carry G:C>A:T transitions at CpG sites (P 5 0.01 for neversmokers and P < 0.001 for never-drinkers). EGFR mutations were found in 4% of cases. Inactivation of TP53 by mutations is a crucial molecular event in the UADT carcinogenesis and it is closely related to exposure to lifestyle risk factors. EGFR mutations do not appear to be a common event in UADT carcinogenesis in this population. © The Author 2009. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: [email protected] /* */
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2009 · Carcinogenesis

Publication Stats

986 Citations
260.68 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1997-2013
    • Fundação Oswaldo Cruz
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • 2011
    • Bahiana School of Medicine and Public Health
      Bahia, Estado de Bahía, Brazil
  • 2008
    • Health Secretariat, Rio de Janeiro
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • 2007
    • International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
      Wien, Vienna, Austria
    • Brazilian National Cancer Institute
      • Pediatric Hematology-Oncology Program
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
  • 2006
    • University of São Paulo
      San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • 2002-2006
    • Federal University of Rio de Janeiro
      Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil