Ravi V Shah

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (81)489.21 Total impact

  • Ravi V. Shah · Venkatesh L. Murthy

    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Atherosclerosis
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    ABSTRACT: Dietary quality affects cardiometabolic risk, yet its pathways of influence on regional adipose tissue depots involved in metabolic and diabetes risk are not well established. We aimed to investigate the relationship between dietary quality and regional adiposity.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Background and aims: Fat radiodensity, as measured by fat attenuation on computed tomography (CT), has emerged as a potential biomarker of "fat quality." We sought to characterize the relationship between fat radiodensity and quantity in subcutaneous, visceral, and intermuscular fat depots, and its role in inflammation, insulin resistance, and metabolic syndrome (MetS). Methods and results: We studied 1511 individuals from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis who underwent CT for measurement of regional fat distribution and radiodensity, along with biomarker assessments and adjudication of incident metabolic syndrome (MetS). Linear, logistic and Cox regression analyses were used to measure association between fat radiodensity and (1) fat quantity, (2) biomarkers of cardiometabolic dysfunction, and (3) both prevalent and incident MetS. In each fat depot, radiodensity was strongly and inversely associated with quantity (e.g., visceral fat radiodensity vs. quantity: ρ = -0.82, P < 0.01). After adjustment for age, sex and race, lower visceral fat radiodensity was associated with greater C-reactive protein, leptin and insulin, but lower adiponectin (P < 0.01 for all). After full adjustment for cardiovascular disease risk factors, visceral (but not subcutaneous or intermuscular) fat radiodensity was associated with prevalent MetS (OR = 0.96, 95% CI = 0.93-0.99, P = 0.01). Moreover, lower visceral fat radiodensity was associated with incident MetS after the same adjustment (HR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.93-0.98, P < 0.01). However, this association became non-significant after further adjustment for visceral fat quantity. Conclusion: Fat radiodensity is strongly correlated with fat quantity and relevant inflammatory biomarkers. Fat radiodensity (especially for visceral fat) may be a complementary, easily assessed marker of cardiometabolic risk.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases: NMCD
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    ABSTRACT: Importance Although cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is prognostic in older adults, the effect of CRF during early adulthood on long-term cardiovascular structure, function, and prognosis is less clear.Objective To examine whether CRF in young adults is associated with long-term clinical outcome and subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD).Design, Setting, and Participants Prospective study of 4872 US adults aged 18 to 30 years who underwent treadmill exercise testing at a baseline study visit from March 25, 1985, to June 7, 1986, and 2472 individuals who underwent a second treadmill test 7 years later. Median follow-up was 26.9 years, with assessment of obesity, left ventricular mass and strain, coronary artery calcification (CAC), and vital status and incident CVD. Follow-up was complete on August 31, 2011, and data were analyzed from recruitment through the end of follow-up.Main Outcomes and Measures The presence of CAC was assessed by computed tomography at years 15 (2000-2001), 20 (2005-2006), and 25 (2010-2011), and left ventricular mass was assessed at years 5 (1990-1991) and 25 (with global longitudinal strain). Incident CVD and all-cause mortality were adjudicated.Results Of the 4872 individuals, 273 (5.6%) died and 193 (4.0%) experienced CVD events during follow-up. After comprehensive adjustment, each additional minute of baseline exercise test duration was associated with a 15% lower hazard of death (hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; 95% CI, 0.80-0.91; P < .001) and a 12% lower hazard of CVD (HR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.81-0.96; P = .002). Higher levels of baseline CRF were associated with significantly lower left ventricular mass index (β = −0.24; 95% CI, −0.45 to −0.03; P = .02) and significantly better lobal longitudinal strain (β = −0.09; 95% CI, −0.14 to −0.05; P < .001) at year 25. Fitness was not associated with CAC. A 1-minute reduction in fitness by year 7 was associated with 21% and 20% increased hazards of death (HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.07-1.37; P = .002) and CVD (HR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.06-1.37; P = .006), respectively, along with a more impaired strain (β = 0.15; 95% CI, 0.08-0.23; P < .001). No association between change in fitness and CAC was found.Conclusions and Relevance Higher levels of fitness at baseline and improvement in fitness early in adulthood are favorably associated with lower risks for CVD and mortality. Fitness and changes in fitness are associated with myocardial hypertrophy and dysfunction but not CAC. Regular efforts to ascertain and improve CRF in young adulthood may play a critical role in promoting cardiovascular health and interrupting early CVD pathogenesis.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · JAMA Internal Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Diffuse myocardial fibrosis is involved in the pathology of nonischemic cardiomyopathy (NIC). Recently, the application of native (noncontrast) myocardial T1 measurement has been proposed as a method for characterizing diffuse interstitial fibrosis. To determine the association of native T1 with myocardial structure and function, we prospectively studied 39 patients with NIC (defined as left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤50% without cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) evidence of previous infarction) and 27 subjects with normal LVEF without known overt cardiovascular disease. T1, T2, and extracellular volume fraction (ECV) were determined over 16 segments across the base, mid, and apical left ventricular (LV). NIC participants (57 ± 15 years) were predominantly men (74%), with a mean LVEF 34 ± 10%. Subjects with NIC had a greater native T1 (1,131 ± 51 vs 1,069 ± 29 ms; p <0.0001), a greater ECV (0.28 ± 0.04 vs 0.25 ± 0.02, p = 0.002), and a longer myocardial T2 (52 ± 8 vs 47 ± 5 ms; p = 0.02). After multivariate adjustment, a lower global native T1 time in NIC was associated with a greater LVEF (β = -0.59, p = 0.0003), greater right ventricular ejection fraction (β = -0.47, p = 0.006), and smaller left atrial volume index (β = 0.51, p = 0.001). The regional distribution of native myocardial T1 was similar in patients with and without NIC. In NIC, native myocardial T1 is elevated in all myocardial segments, suggesting a global (not regional) abnormality of myocardial tissue composition. In conclusion, native T1 may represent a rapid, noncontrast alternative to ECV for delineating myocardial tissue remodeling in NIC.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The American journal of cardiology
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    Hong Jun Yun · Ravi V Shah · Venkatesh L Murthy

    Preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Nuclear Cardiology
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    ABSTRACT: Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is an increasingly used supportive measure for patients with refractory cardiogenic shock (CS). Despite its increasing use, there remain minimal data regarding which patients with refractory CS are most likely to benefit from ECMO. We retrospectively studied all patients (n = 123) who underwent initiation of ECMO for CS from February 2009 to September 2014 at a single center. Baseline patient characteristics, including demographics, co-morbid illness, cause of CS, available laboratory values, and patient outcomes were analyzed. Overall, 69 patients (56%) were weaned from ECMO, with 48 patients (39%) surviving to discharge. Survivors were younger (50 vs 60 years; p ≤0.0001), had a lower rate of previous smoking (27 vs 56%; p = 0.01) and chronic kidney disease (2% vs 13%; p = 0.03), and had lower lactate measured soon after ECMO initiation (3.1 vs 10.2 mmol/l; p = 0.01). Patients with pulmonary embolism (odds ratio 8.0, 95% confidence interval 2.00 to 31.99; p = 0.01) and acute cardiomyopathy (odds ratio 7.5, 95% confidence interval 1.69 to 33.27; p = 0.01) had a higher rate of survival than acute myocardial infarction, chronic cardiomyopathy, and miscellaneous etiologies compared to postcardiotomy CS as a referent. In conclusion, survival after ECMO initiation differs based on underlying cause of CS. Survival may be lower in older patients and those with early evidence of persistent hypoperfusion after initiation of ECMO for CS.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · The American journal of cardiology
  • Ravi V Shah · Michael Jerosch-Herold

    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Circulation Cardiovascular Imaging
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    ABSTRACT: To balance competing cardiovascular benefits and metabolic risks of statins, markers of type 2 diabetes (T2D) susceptibility are needed. We sought to define a competing risk/benefit of statin therapy on T2D and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events using liver attenuation and coronary artery calcification (CAC). 3153 individuals from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) without CVD, T2D/impaired fasting glucose, or baseline statin therapy had CT imaging for CAC and hepatic attenuation (hepatic steatosis). Cox models and rates of CVD and T2D were calculated to assess the role of liver attenuation in T2D and the relative risks/benefits of statins on CVD and T2D. 216 T2D cases were diagnosed at median 9.1 years follow-up. High liver fat and statin therapy were associated with diabetes (HR 2.06 [95%CI 1.52-2.79, P < 0.0001] and 2.01 [95%CI 1.46-2.77, P < 0.0001], respectively), after multivariable adjustment. With low liver fat and CAC = 0, the number needed to treat (NNT) for statin to prevent one CVD event (NNT 218) was higher than the number needed to harm (NNH) with an incident case of T2D (NNH 68). Conversely, those with CAC >100 and low liver fat were more likely to benefit from statins for CVD reduction (NNT 29) relative to T2D risk (NNH 67). Among those with CAC >100 and fatty liver, incremental reduction in CVD with statins (NNT 40) was less than incremental risk increase for T2D (NNH 24). Liver fat is associated with incident T2D and stratifies competing metabolic/CVD risks with statin therapy. Hepatic fat may inform T2D surveillance and lipid therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Atherosclerosis
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    ABSTRACT: Visceral fat (VF) is a source of pro-inflammatory adipokines implicated in cardiac remodeling. We sought to determine the impact of visceral fat and subcutaneous fat (SQ) depots on left ventricular (LV) structure, function, and geometry in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). We performed a post-hoc analysis on 1151 participants from MESA with cardiac magnetic resonance quantification of LV mass and LV mass-to-volume ratio (LVMV, an index of concentricity) and computed tomographic-derived SQ and VF area. Multivariable regression models to estimate association between height-indexed SQ and VF area (per cm(2)/m) with height-indexed LV mass (per height(2.7)) and LVMV were constructed, adjusted for clinical, biochemical, and demographic covariates. We found that both VF and SQ area were associated with height-indexed LV mass (ρ = 0.36 and 0.12, P < 0.0001, respectively), while only VF area was associated with LVMV (ρ = 0.28, P < 0.0001). Individuals with above-median VF had lower LV ejection fraction, greater indexed LV volumes and mass, and higher LVMV (all P < 0.001). In multivariable models adjusted for weight, VF (but not SQ) area was associated with LV concentricity and LV mass index, across both sexes. Visceral adiposity is independently associated with LV concentricity, a precursor to heart failure. Further study into the role of VF in LV remodeling as a potential therapeutic target is warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Nutrition Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives The aim of this study was to describe the role of contrast-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in the workup of patients with aborted sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and in the prediction of long-term outcomes. Background Myocardial fibrosis is a key substrate for SCA, and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on a CMR study is a robust technique for imaging of myocardial fibrosis. Methods We performed a retrospective review of all survivors of SCA who were referred for CMR studies and performed follow-up for the subsequent occurrence of an adverse event (death and appropriate defibrillator therapy). Results After a workup that included a clinical history, electrocardiogram, echocardiography, and coronary angiogram, 137 patients underwent CMR for workup of aborted SCA (66% male; mean age 56 ± 11 years; left ventricular ejection fraction 43 ± 12%). The presenting arrhythmias were ventricular fibrillation (n = 105 [77%]) and ventricular tachycardia (n = 32 [23%]). Overall, LGE was found in 98 patients (71%), with an average extent of 9.9 ± 5% of the left ventricular myocardium. CMR imaging provided a diagnosis or an arrhythmic substrate in 104 patients (76%), including the presence of an infarct-pattern LGE in 60 patients (44%), noninfarct LGE in 21 (15%), active myocarditis in 14 (10%), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 3 (2%), sarcoidosis in 3, and arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy in 3. In a median follow-up of 29 months (range 18 to 43 months), there were 63 events. In a multivariable analysis, the strongest predictors of recurrent events were the presence of LGE (adjusted hazard ratio: 6.7; 95% CI: 2.38 to 18.85; p < 0.001) and the extent of LGE (hazard ratio: 1.15; 95% CI: 1.11 to 1.19; p < 0.001). Conclusions Among patients with SCA, CMR with contrast identified LGE in 71% and provided a potential arrhythmic substrate in 76%. In follow-up, both the presence and extent of LGE identified a group at markedly increased risk of future adverse events.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · JACC. Cardiovascular imaging
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with left ventricular systolic dysfunction frequently show abnormal coronary vascular function, even in the absence of overt coronary artery disease. Moreover, the severity of vascular dysfunction might be related to the aetiology of cardiomyopathy. We sought to determine the incremental value of assessing coronary vascular dysfunction among patients with ischaemic (ICM) and non-ischaemic (NICM) cardiomyopathy at risk for adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Coronary flow reserve (CFR, stress/rest myocardial blood flow) was quantified in 510 consecutive patients with rest left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤45% referred for rest/stress myocardial perfusion PET imaging. The primary end point was a composite of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) including cardiac death, heart failure hospitalization, late revascularization, and aborted sudden cardiac death. Median follow-up was 8.2 months. Cox proportional hazards model was used to adjust for clinical variables. The annualized MACE rate was 26.3%. Patients in the lowest two tertiles of CFR (CFR ≤ 1.65) experienced higher MACE rates than those in the highest tertile (32.6 vs. 15.5% per year, respectively, P = 0.004), irrespective of aetiology of cardiomyopathy. Impaired coronary vascular function, as assessed by reduced CFR by PET imaging, is common in patients with both ischaemic and non-ischaemic cardiomyopathy and is associated with MACE. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · European Heart Journal – Cardiovascular Imaging
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    ABSTRACT: To measure association between hepatic fat and albuminuria (an early marker of renal injury) in individuals without diabetes or hypertension. 2,281 individuals in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis without diabetes or hypertension, renal disease, or excess alcohol consumption underwent computed tomography (CT) for assessment of liver attenuation (marker of hepatic lipid content) and urinalysis (for albuminuria) at initial study visit, with assessment of incident and prevalent albuminuria by logistic regression in follow-up. After adjustment for age, gender, race, smoking, blood pressure, insulin resistance, and body mass index, individuals with less liver fat (higher liver CT attenuation) had a lower probability of having albuminuria at Exam 1 (OR per 10 unit increase in attenuation 0.77, 95 % CI 0.61-0.97, P = 0.02). At median 9.3 years follow-up, albuminuria was identified in 129 individuals were (5.8 %). In fully adjusted models (with age, smoking, body mass index, blood pressure, diabetes and hypertension as time-dependent covariates), lower liver attenuation (greater liver fat) was associated with higher risk of incident albuminuria (OR 0.79, 95 % CI 0.66-0.94, P = 0.008). Hepatic attenuation is associated with prevalent and incident albuminuria, an early, potent risk factor for renal risk in a population not clearly at risk for future renal failure.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Journal of nephrology
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    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Coronary artery reimplantation is crucial step during the arterial switch (ASO) and Ross operation. Mortality and long-term outcome after the operation mainly depend on the patency and function of the reimplanted coronary arteries. Purpose: We utilized advanced CMR methods to perform a noninvasive assessment of myocardial blood flow, viability, function and diffuse fibrosis in patients after ASO and Ross operation to guide further therapy and for a better understanding of the microcirculation. Methods: MRI first-pass perfusion imaging (0.03 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA; TR/TE/α = 2.6/1.1/20°) was performed in 36 patients (age, 15.75±10.94 yrs; transposition of the great arteries post arterial switch operation n=25, post Ross operation for the treatment of aortic valve disease n=11) and in 10 age matched healthy controls. Myocardial blood flow (ml/g/min) was calculated in 6 LV segments per slice (2-3 slices/pt). Quantitative blood flow at rest and stress (Adenosin 140 μg/kg/min) was derived from signal intensity curves by model independent deconvolution. Late enhancement studies (Gd 0.1 mmol/kg) using T1 weighted inversion recovery sequences were performed to detect myocardial scar. A Look-Locker technique (temporal resolution, 40 ms; slice thickness, 8 mm; repetition time, 3 R-R intervals) for measurements of T1 was used for detecting of LV diffuse fibrosis. Furthermore, cine MRI and 3 D coronary artery imaging were performed. Results: Of the entire cohort 15 pts (41.7%) had known or suspected coronary problems such as occlusion, stenosis or hypoplasia. In 7/15 pts (46.7%) we found regional ischemia, scar tissue (28.6%) and regional or global impairment of LV function (30%). As a consequence of our findings one patient received MIDCAB surgery and 4 patients (26.7%) were treated medically. In pts with patent epicardial coronaries (58.3%) myocardial perfusion reserve (MPR) was significantly reduced as compared to the healthy controls (2.79±0.75 vs. 3.75±1.13; p<0.05) and only in one patient scar tissue was detected. No regional or global wall motion abnormalities were detected. Furthermore, T1 mapping showed increased extracellular matrix expansion suggestive of diffuse fibrosis (0.37±0.09 vs. 0.26±0.01; p<0.02). Conclusions: CMR imaging can provide a comprehensive assessment of myocardial perfusion, viability and function in patients after coronary reimplantation to guide further therapy such as surgical revascularisation. Of note, in patients with patent epicardial coronaries, we measured an impaired myocardial perfusion reserve and increased interstitial fibrosis.
    Preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance
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    ABSTRACT: We aimed to assess whether chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with expansion of the myocardial extracellular volume (ECV) using T1 measurements. Adult COPD patients Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] stage 2 or higher and free of known cardiovascular disease were recruited. All study patients underwent measures of pulmonary function, 6-minute walk test, serum measures of inflammation, overnight polysomnography, and a contrast cardiac magnetic resonance study. Eight patients with COPD were compared with 8 healthy control subjects. The mean predicted forced expiratory volume at 1 second of COPD subjects was 68%. Compared with control subjects, patients had normal left ventricular (LV) and right ventricular size, mass, and function. However, compared with control subjects, the LV remodelling index (median, 0.87; interquartile range [IQR], 0.71-1.14; vs median, 0.62; IQR, 0.60-0.77; P ¼ 0.03) and active left atrial emptying fraction was increased (median, 46; IQR, 41-49; vs median, 38; IQR, 33-43; P ¼ 0.005), and passive left atrial emptying fraction was reduced (median, 24; IQR, 20-30; vs median, 44; IQR, 31-51; P ¼ 0.007). The ECV was increased in patients with COPD (median, 0.32; IQR, 0.05; vs median, 0.27; IQR, 0.05; P = 0.001). The ECV showed a strong positive association with LV remodelling (r = 0.72; P = 0.04) and an inverse association with the 6-minute walk duration (r = -0.79; P = 0.02) and passive left atrial emptying fraction (r = -0.68; P = 0.003). Expansion of the ECV, suggestive of diffuse myocardial fibrosis, is present in COPD and is associated with LV remodelling, and reduced left atrial function and exercise capacity. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · The Canadian journal of cardiology
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    ABSTRACT: This study sought to evaluate differential effects of visceral fat (VF) and subcutaneous fat and their effects on metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk across body mass index (BMI) categories. The regional distribution of adipose tissue is an emerging risk factor for cardiometabolic disease, although serial changes in fat distribution have not been extensively investigated. VF and its alterations over time may be a better marker for risk than BMI in normal weight and overweight or obese individuals. We studied 1,511 individuals in the MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) with adiposity assessment by computed tomography (CT). A total of 253 participants without MetS at initial scan underwent repeat CT (median interval 3.3 years). We used discrete Cox regression with net reclassification to investigate whether baseline and changes in VF area are associated with MetS. Higher VF was associated with cardiometabolic risk and coronary artery calcification, regardless of BMI. After adjustment, VF was more strongly associated with incident MetS than subcutaneous fat regardless of weight, with a 28% greater MetS hazard per 100 cm(2)/m VF area and significant net reclassification (net reclassification index: 0.44, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.29 to 0.60) over clinical risk. In individuals with serial imaging, initial VF (hazard ratio: 1.24 per 100 cm(2)/m, 95% CI: 1.08 to 1.44 per 100 cm(2)/m, p = 0.003) and change in VF (hazard ratio: 1.05 per 5% change, 95% CI: 1.01 to 1.08 per 5% change, p = 0.02) were associated with MetS after adjustment. Changes in subcutaneous fat were not associated with incident MetS after adjustment for clinical risk and VF area. VF is modestly associated with BMI. However, across BMI, a single measure of and longitudinal change in VF predict MetS, even accounting for weight changes. Visceral adiposity is essential to assessing cardiometabolic risk, regardless of age, race, or BMI, and may serve as a marker and target of therapy in cardiometabolic disease. Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · JACC Cardiovascular Imaging
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    ABSTRACT: A standard ("core") implementation of American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 lipid guidelines (based on 10-year risk) dramatically increases the statin-eligible population in older Americans, raising controversy in the cardiovascular community. The guidelines also endorse a more "comprehensive" risk approach based in part on lifetime risk. The impact of this broader approach on statin eligibility remains unclear. We studied the impact of 2 different implementations of the new guidelines ("core" and "comprehensive") using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Although "core" guidelines led to 72.0 million subjects qualifying for statin therapy, the broader "comprehensive" application led to nearly a twofold greater estimate for statin-eligible subjects (121.2 million), with the greatest impact among those aged 21 to 45 years. Subjects indicated for statin therapy under comprehensive guidelines had a greater burden of cardiovascular risk factors and a higher lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease than those not indicated for statins. In particular, men aged 21 to 45 years had a 3.13-fold increased odds of being eligible for statin therapy only under the "comprehensive" guidelines (vs standard "core" guidelines; 95% confidence interval 2.82 to 3.47, p <0.0001). There were no racial differences. In conclusion, the "comprehensive" approach to statin eligibility espoused by the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association 2013 guidelines would increase the statin-eligible population to over 120 million Americans, particularly targeting younger men with high-risk factor burden. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · The American Journal of Cardiology
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    ABSTRACT: We investigated the association between major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and inducible ischemia on regadenoson cardiac magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging (CMRMPI) performed at 3.0-Tesla. Regadenoson stress CMRMPI is increasingly used to assess patients with suspected ischemia; however, its values in patient prognostication and risk reclassification are only emerging. We studied 346 patients with suspected ischemia who were referred for regadenoson CMR. We determined the prognostic association of presence of inducible ischemia by CMR with major adverse cardiac events (MACE). In addition, we assessed the extent of net reclassification improvement (NRI) by CMR beyond a clinical risk model. There were 52 MACE during a median follow-up of 1.9 years. Patients with inducible ischemia were four-fold more likely to experience MACE (HR=4.14, 95% CI 2.37-7.24, P<0.0001). In the best overall model, presence of inducible ischemia conferred a 2.6-fold increased hazard to MACE adjusted to known clinical risk markers (adjusted HR 2.59, 95% CI 1.30-5.18, P=0.0069). Individuals with no inducible ischemia experienced a low rate of cardiac death and MI (0.6% per patient year), while individuals with inducible ischemia had an annual event rate of 3.2%. NRI across risk categories (low <5%, intermediate 5-10%, and high >10%) by CMR was 0.29 [95%CI 0.15-0.44] and continuous NRI was 0.58. In conclusion, patients with a clinical suspicion of myocardial ischemia, regadenoson stress CMRMPI provides robust risk stratification. A CMRMPI negative for ischemia was associated with very low annual rate of hard cardiac events. In addition, CMRMPI provides effective risk reclassification in a substantial proportion of patients.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance
  • Ravi V Shah · Michael M Givertz

    No preview · Article · Sep 2014 · Journal of Cardiac Failure

Publication Stats

1k Citations
489.21 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2015
    • Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2013-2015
    • Brigham and Women's Hospital
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Division of Cardiac Surgery
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    • St. James's Hospital
      Dublin, Leinster, Ireland
  • 2008-2015
    • Harvard University
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2009-2014
    • Massachusetts General Hospital
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Division of Cardiology
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2006-2014
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States