Fabrice Robichon

University of Burgundy, Dijon, Bourgogne, France

Are you Fabrice Robichon?

Claim your profile

Publications (23)43.48 Total impact

  • Source
    Jean-Yves Baudouin · Mathieu Gallay · Karine Durand · Fabrice Robichon
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This study investigated children's perceptual ability to process second-order facial relations. In total, 78 children in three age groups (7, 9, and 11 years) and 28 adults were asked to say whether the eyes were the same distance apart in two side-by-side faces. The two faces were similar on all points except the space between the eyes, which was either the same or different, with various degrees of difference. The results showed that the smallest eye spacing children were able to discriminate decreased with age. This ability was sensitive to face orientation (upright or upside-down), and this inversion effect increased with age. It is concluded here that, despite early sensitivity to configural/holistic information, the perceptual ability to process second-order relations in faces improves with age and constrains the development of the face recognition ability.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2010 · Journal of Experimental Child Psychology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The development of children's ability to recognize facial emotions and the role of configural information in this development were investigated. In the study, 100 5-, 7-, 9-, and 11-year-olds and 26 adults needed to recognize the emotion displayed by upright and upside-down faces. The same participants needed to recognize the emotion displayed by the top half of an upright or upside-down face that was or was not aligned with a bottom half that displayed another emotion. The results showed that the ability to recognize facial emotion develops with age, with a developmental course that depends on the emotion to be recognized. Moreover, children at all ages and adults exhibited both an inversion effect and a composite effect, suggesting that children rely on configural information to recognize facial emotions.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2007 · Journal of Experimental Child Psychology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the consequences of proprioception changes induced by a postural treatment on cognitive disturbances in children suffering from developmental dyslexia. and methods: Twenty male dyslexic children were treated with prisms within their spectacles and a postural treatment. A control group of dyslexics (n=13) only received spectacles without prisms. All participants were evaluated at the beginning of the study and 6 months later with reading impairment tests and postural examinations. Mean age was 11 years and 5 months in the treated group and 11 years and 7 months in the control group. Four children were excluded from the 6-month analysis because of poor compliance. All dyslexic children presented with a postural deficiency syndrome. In 13 out of 16 treated children, dyslexia was improved at 6 months, especially for the global leximetric test and the reading of regular and irregular words. However, the treatment did not allow a complete recovery of reading ability when compared with age-matched individuals. Our results show that postural modifications may favorably influence some clinical signs associated with developmental dyslexia. Further studies with a larger sample and with a longer follow-up period are required to better assess the role of postural treatment in developmental dyslexia.
    Full-text · Article · May 2007 · Journal francais d'ophtalmologie
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: But de l’étudeL’objectif de ce travail est d’évaluer l’impact des modifications proprioceptives induites par un traitement postural sur les troubles cognitifs d’une population d’enfants souffrant de dyslexie de développement.Patients et méthodesIl a été constitué un groupe de 20 enfants dyslexiques traités par prismes posturaux, semelles « de posture » et rééducation posturale, et un groupe témoin de 13 enfants dyslexiques portant uniquement des lunettes sans prismes. Tous les enfants étaient de sexe masculin. Lors de leur inclusion dans l’étude (M0) et 6 mois plus tard (M6), tous les participants ont été évalués par un bilan ophtalmologique et postural et ont reçu un examen neuropsychologique concernant les processus visuo-lexicaux par un examinateur en insu ainsi que les processus phonologiques et métaphonologiques.RésultatsL’âge moyen des enfants du « groupe traité » était de 11 ans et 5 mois et celui des enfants du « groupe non traité » de 11 ans et 7 mois. Quatre enfants du « groupe traité » ont été exclus à M6 pour non-observance du traitement. Tous les patients dyslexiques présentaient un syndrome de déficience posturale lors de l’inclusion. Chez les sujets traités, le traitement a été bénéfique pour les signes fonctionnels et la plupart des signes physiques par rapport au « groupe non traité ». Chez 13 des 16 enfants traités, il a amélioré de manière significative certains paramètres de la dyslexie, notamment le test de leximétrie globale, la lecture des mots réguliers et irréguliers, et les épreuves de décision orthographique et de complétion graphémique. Les épreuves concernant les processus phonologiques et celles concernant la manipulation mentale des sons du langage (conscience phonologique) n’ont pas été significativement améliorées.ConclusionLes résultats de cette étude ouvrent une nouvelle voie de recherche en montrant qu’une modification de la proprioception peut être bénéfique sur certains éléments cliniques rencontrés dans la dyslexie de développement. Le niveau d’action du traitement postural sur les signes de dyslexie qui se sont améliorés reste à préciser. Cette étude préliminaire doit être complétée par un essai thérapeutique sur un plus grand nombre de patients et pendant une plus longue durée.PurposeTo evaluate the consequences of proprioception changes induced by a postural treatment on cognitive disturbances in children suffering from developmental dyslexia.Material and methodsTwenty male dyslexic children were treated with prisms within their spectacles and a postural treatment. A control group of dyslexics (n=13) only received spectacles without prisms. All participants were evaluated at the beginning of the study and 6 months later with reading impairment tests and postural examinations.ResultsMean age was 11 years and 5 months in the treated group and 11 years and 7 months in the control group. Four children were excluded from the 6-month analysis because of poor compliance. All dyslexic children presented with a postural deficiency syndrome. In 13 out of 16 treated children, dyslexia was improved at 6 months, especially for the global leximetric test and the reading of regular and irregular words. However, the treatment did not allow a complete recovery of reading ability when compared with age-matched individuals.Conclusion Our results show that postural modifications may favorably influence some clinical signs associated with developmental dyslexia. Further studies with a larger sample and with a longer follow-up period are required to better assess the role of postural treatment in developmental dyslexia.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2007 · Journal francais d'ophtalmologie

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2007
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The present investigation tries to better understand potential association and causal relationship between phonological and postural impairment due to developmental dyslexia. The study included 50 boys with developmental dyslexia and selected on the basis of their overall reading difficulties, and 42 control boys. Body sway during a quite standing posture eye open and eye closed on a force platform were tested in the two groups of subjects that were between 10 and 13 years of age. Analysis of classical parameters quantifying the centre of pressure (CP) displacements along antero-posterior and lateral axes showed a significant difference between the two groups. Dyslexic children showed on average greater instability, with greater length, variability and mean power frequency of CP displacements with or without vision. Our results demonstrate that postural parameters may discriminate between children with dyslexia and age-equivalent controls.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2006 · Neuroscience Letters
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study is to assess proprioception anomalies in postural deficiency syndrome in a group of children suffering from reading impairment. Sixty male patients with an average age of 11 years and 9 months were included in the study. Initially, they were given a standardized neuropsychological examination, which confirmed the diagnosis of reading impairment. Then after filling out a questionnaire seeking a proprioceptive anomaly, the patients were subjected to a clinical ocular and postural examination consisting of nine precisely described steps. All of the patients recruited for the study presented clinical signs confirming a proprioception disorder found as a part of postural deficiency syndrome. This study opens a new direction for research concerning the origin and treatment of at least some reading-impaired children.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2005 · Journal francais d'ophtalmologie
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Purpose The objective of this study is to assess proprioception anomalies in postural deficiency syndrome in a group of children suffering from reading impairment. Material and methods Sixty male patients with an average age of 11 years and 9 months were included in the study. Initially, they were given a standardized neuropsychological examination, which confirmed the diagnosis of reading impairment. Then after filling out a questionnaire seeking a proprioceptive anomaly, the patients were subjected to a clinical ocular and postural examination consisting of nine precisely described steps. Results All of the patients recruited for the study presented clinical signs confirming a proprioception disorder found as a part of postural deficiency syndrome. Conclusion This study opens a new direction for research concerning the origin and treatment of at least some reading-impaired children.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2005 · Journal francais d'ophtalmologie
  • Pierre Vernet · P. Quercia · Fabrice Robichon · Thierry Pozzo

    No preview · Article · Jun 2005 · Gait & Posture
  • E Vinckenbosch · F Robichon · S Eliez
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Affecting up to 4-10% of the population, dyslexia is a highly prevalent, childhood onset developmental disorder adversely influencing multiple domains of adaptive functioning throughout the lifespan. The present brain imaging study was conducted in order to investigate the neuroanatomical correlates of developmental dyslexia. The MRI brain scans of 10 males with dyslexia and 14 matched controls were analyzed with (1) a classical volumetric method measuring gray and white matter lobar volumes and (2) a voxel-by-voxel method. The voxel-by-voxel method identifies changes in tissue density and localizes morphologic alterations without limiting the analyses to predefined regions. Subsequent correlations between gray matter density and neuropsychological performance on specific phonological processing tasks (rhyme judgment) were conducted. Volumetric analyses revealed significantly reduced gray matter volumes in both temporal lobes in dyslexic individuals. The voxel-by-voxel analyses further localized changes to the left temporal lobe, revealing reduced gray matter density in the middle and inferior temporal gyri. Conversely, increased gray matter density was found in the precentral gyri bilaterally. As a combined group, the dyslexic and control subjects demonstrated positive correlations between performance on the rhyme judgment tasks and gray matter density in the middle and inferior frontal gyri, and the middle temporal gyri bilaterally. The current study indicates that dyslexia is associated with a structural gray matter deficit involving a complex fronto-temporal network implicated in phonological processing.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2005 · Neuropsychologia
  • Fabrice Robichon · Mireille Besson · Michel Habib
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Event-related potentials and cued-recall performance were used to compare dyslexic and control adult subjects. Sentences that ended either congruously or incongruously were presented visually, one word at a time, at fast (stimulus-onset-asynchrony (SOA)=100 ms) or slow (SOA=700 ms) rates of presentation. Results revealed (1) a large effect of presentation rate that started with the N1-P2 components and lasted for the entire recording period, (2) larger N400 components for dyslexic than control subjects, at slow presentation rates, to both congruous and incongruous endings and (3) a large ERPs difference related to memory (Dm effect) that did not differentiate controls from dyslexics but was larger at slow than at fast rates of presentation. These findings indicate that the reading impairment observed in the present group of adult dyslexics is more likely to result from difficulties integrating the meaning of words within a sentence context than from pure sensory processing deficits.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2002 · Biological Psychology
  • M. Habib · F. Robichon
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This article summarizes the main studies dealing with investigations of the neuroanatomical substrate of brain lateralization. Although being known for more than a century, anatomical asymmetries in the language cortical areas have not been related to asymmetry of function until the last few decades, during which a great amount of work has been devoted to the subject without convincing outcome. Following the early post-mortem anatomical works, this research area has largely benefited from the advent of brain imaging methods, especially magnetic resonance imaging. Current views, contrary to the initials beliefs, tend to abandon the notion that one posterior temporal structure, the Planum temporale, could be a key region relative to the debate around the biological mechanisms of brain asymmetry. Instead, it seems that all the posterior sylvian region, including the parietal operculum, is relevant to the issue. Another structure which has also been dealt with widely in brain imaging studies is the corpus callosum, the mass of white matter fibers connecting the two hemispheres. The main and most robust result is that the corpus callosum is larger in lefthanded males, suggesting the intervention of a sex-related factor. But, for the latter studies, as for those involving cortical asymmetries, the apparent inconsistency of results may be related to complexity of underlying mechanisms, involving genetic, prenatal environmental and experience-bound post-natal factors. Finally, the special case of developmental dyslexia obviously represents a mostly promising model of atypical development of brain asymmetries and interhemispheric connections in relation to cognitive function. However, here again, the issue of the link between anatomical observations and clinical abnormalities remains fundamentally unresolved.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2002 · Revue de Neuropsychologie
  • Sandrine Monnery · Alix Seigneuric · Daniel Zagar · Fabrice Robichon
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Williams syndrome (WS) is a rareneuro-developmental disorder characterised byspared language in the face of serious deficitsin nonlinguistic cognitive abilities. Weconducted a study on ten WS individuals inwhich gender agreement and gender assignmentwere assessed by means of two tasks: gendercategorisation and gender concord. Subjectsperformed gender categorisation to real nounswhose gender was regular or exceptional giventheir ending, and to invented nouns which werecomposed of nonword or word stems and realword-endings. The same material was used in thegender concord task in which subjects had tomatch the items with the appropriate form ofthe article and the adjective carrying genderagreement. In the gender categorisation of realwords, WS were lower than controls but bothgroups demonstrated a similar sensitivity togender-ending regularities. In the gendercategorisation of nonwords, the results showeda clear dissociation. The WS subjects producedmore ending-consistent responses than thecontrols. Contrary to the controls, WS reliedheavily on the gender clue provided by theending even when the gender of the word evokedby the stem of the invented word was opposed tothat evoked by the ending. Participants with WSwere not influenced by the specific word evokedby the stem of the invented word. In the secondtask (concord task), the WS subjects performed well although lower than thecontrols. We concluded that the WS people werenot impaired in gender agreement which relieson syntactic rules and/or on the extraction ofregularities but experienced difficulties inretrieving lexical instances.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2002 · Reading and Writing
  • Source
    F Robichon · O Levrier · P Farnarier · M Habib
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Using brain magnetic resonance imaging, we measured in 16 young developmental dyslexic adults and 14 age-matched controls cortical asymmetries of posterior language-related areas, including Planum temporale and parietal operculum cortical ribbon, and of the inferior frontal region related in the left hemisphere to speech processing. In addition, we assessed the sulcal morphology of the inferior frontal gyrus in both groups according to a qualitative method. The dyslexic subjects also performed specific tasks exploring different aspects of phonological and lexical-semantic processes. Results showed that: (1) contrary to most results reported in the literature, there is a lack of any morphological difference relative to Planum temporale asymmetry between the two groups; (2) there are significant differences between dyslexic and control subjects relative to frontal areas; (3) concerning the parietal region, there is a more asymmetrical pattern towards the left side in dyslexic subjects than in controls; and (4) relations in dyslexic subjects between parietal asymmetry coefficient and the level of performance in a phonological task have a particular reliance on verbal short-term memory, frontal asymmetry and performance in a non-word reading task. Considering these results it is suggested that phonological segmentation skills may relate to frontal lobe morphology, while phonological memory-based impairment in people with dyslexia may rather relate to parietal lobe morphology.
    Preview · Article · Feb 2000 · European Journal of Neurology
  • Fabrice Robichon · Pascal Bouchard · JF Demonet · Michel Habib
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Using a new method based upon the measurement of four angles, we analyzed the corpus callosum of 23 adult male dyslexics and 25 age-matched controls on MRI sagittal scans. Two out of the four angles measured showed significant differences between the groups that are consistent with previous findings concerning the size of the corpus callosum in dyslexics. In particular, posterior regions are concerned, displaying a lowered corpus callosum in dyslexics. These findings are discussed in relation to cortical parietal asymmetries and possible hormonal events, referring to the testosterone hypothesis, that could occur in utero or in the perinatal period in the dyslexic population.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2000 · European Neurology
  • Source
    Fabrice Robichon · Michel Habib
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The classical notion that developmental dyslexia may somehow relate to impaired communication between hemispheres has not yet received convincing support. Sixteen dyslexic adults and 12 controls received a high resolution brain MRI scan for morphometric study of the corpus callosum. Automatized measurements of callosal area and calculation of indices defining the general morphology of the callosal mid-surface were performed. Each participant received global intelligence and reading achievement evaluation; dyslexics were further proposed specific neuropsychological tests specially designed to explore the mechanisms of reading impairment. It just appears from the group comparisons (1) that the dyslexics' corpus callosum displays a more circular and evenly thicker general shape, and (2) that the midsagittal surface is on the average larger than in controls, in particular in the isthmus. Moreover, the different morphometric characteristics of the dyslexic brain correlated with the degree of impairment on various tests exploring phonological abilities. In vivo morphometry of the corpus callosum may provide valuable hints for understanding developmental learning disorders and their consequences in adults.
    Preview · Article · Apr 1998 · Brain and Language
  • M. Habib · K. Giraud · M. Berbon · F. Robichon
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We measured the cortical surface of Broca' s area and Planum temporale on brain MRI sections in 20 volunteers, together with the size of the corpus callosum suspected to be sexually dimorphic. We did find sex differences in asymmetry of Broca's area, but in the opposite direction than expected, and a negative correlation between Broca's area asymmetry and anterior corpus callosum size in women. Results suggest that Broca's area may be a specific target of factors determining sex differences and that an inhibitory rule of the corpus callosum could account for complex anatomical-functional relationships. (C) 1999 Academic Press.
    No preview · Article · Sep 1997 · Journal of the Neurological Sciences
  • F. Robichon · M. Habib

    No preview · Article · Sep 1997 · Journal of the Neurological Sciences
  • F. Robichon · P. Farnarier · O. Levrier · M. Habib
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Previous works have suspected that developmental dyslexia may be related to impaired communication between hemispheres. In this study, we focused on the main interhemispheric bundle, the corpus callosum, for which total area, subregions, and morphological indices were appraised by MRI morphometry in 16 dyslexic adults and 12 controls. Cognitive impairment in dyslexies was assessed by specific neuropsychological tests. Results show (1) differences between dyslexies and controls in the callosal size and morphology, (2) a strongly significant group × hand interaction, and (3) positive correlations in dyslexies between anatomical characteristics and phonological abilities. Results are discussed in the view of two subgroups with two neurodevelopmental mechanisms leading to dyslexia.
    No preview · Article · Nov 1996 · Brain and Cognition
  • M. Habib · F. Robichon
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Using brain magnetic resonance imaging, we measured asymmetry of a parietal region including parietal operculum and supramarginal gyrus in 16 young developmental dyslexic adults and 10 matched controls. Dyslexies also performed four cognitive tasks exploring different aspects of phonological processing. Results showed: (1) a more symmetrical pattern in dyslexies than in controls; (2) a positive correlation in dyslexies between asymmetry coefficients and performance in two out of the four phonological tests, having in common their particular reliance on verbal short-term memory. It is suggested that working memory-based phonological impairment in dyslexies may relate to parietal lobe morphology.
    No preview · Article · Nov 1996 · Brain and Cognition

Publication Stats

582 Citations
43.48 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1997-2010
    • University of Burgundy
      • • Laboratoire de Socio-Psychologie et Management du Sport (SPMS)
      • • Département de Psychologie
      • • Laboratoire d'Etude de l'Apprentissage et du Développement (LEAD)
      Dijon, Bourgogne, France
  • 1996
    • French National Centre for Scientific Research
      Lutetia Parisorum, Île-de-France, France