Ramón Serrano

University of Valencia, Valenza, Valencia, Spain

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Publications (104)460.66 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: This study functionally characterizes the Arabidopsis thaliana plastidial glycolytic isoforms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPCp) in photosynthetic and heterotrophic cells. We expressed the enzyme in gapcp double mutants (gapcp1gapcp2) under the control of photosynthetic (RUBISCO small subunit RBCS2B; RBCS), or heterotrophic (phosphate transporter PHT1.2; PHT), cell-specific promoters. Expression of GAPCp1 under the control of RBCS in gapcp1gapcp2 had no significant effect on the metabolite profile or growth in the aerial part (AP). GAPCp1 expression under the control of PHT promoter clearly affected Arabidopsis development, by increasing the number of lateral roots and having a major effect on the AP growth and metabolite profile. Our results indicate that GAPCp1 is not functionally important in photosynthetic cells, but plays a fundamental role in roots and in heterotrophic cells of the AP. Specifically GAPCp activity may be required in root meristems and the root cap for normal primary root growth. Transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses indicate that lack of GAPCp activity affects nitrogen and carbon metabolism as well as mineral nutrition, and that glycerate and glutamine are the main metabolites responding to GAPCp activity. Thus GAPCp could be an important metabolic connector of glycolysis with other pathways such as the phosphorylated pathway of serine biosynthesis, the ammonium assimilation pathway or the metabolism of GABA which in turn affect plant development. Copyright © 2015, Plant Physiology.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Plant physiology
  • Enric Sayas · Federico García-López · Ramón Serrano
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    ABSTRACT: We have compared the toxicity, mutagenicity and transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of three DNA intercalating fluorescent dyes widely used to stain DNA in gels. Safety data about ethidium bromide (EtBr) are contradictory and two compounds of undisclosed structure (Redsafe and Gelred) have been proposed as safe alternatives. Our results indicate that all three compounds inhibit yeast growth, with Gelred being the most inhibitory and also the only one causing cell death. EtBr and Gelred, but not Redsafe, induce massive formation of petite (non-respiratory) mutants but only EtBr induces massive loss of mitochondrial DNA. All three compounds increase reversion of a chromosomal point mutation (lys2-801(amber) ), with Gelred being the most mutagenic and Redsafe the less one. These dyes are all cationic and are probably taken by cells through non-selective cation channels. We could measure the glucose-energized transport of EtBr and Gelred inside the cells while uptake of Redsafe was below our detection limit. We conclude that although all three compounds are toxic and mutagenic in the yeast system, Redsafe is the safest for yeast, probably because of very limited uptake by these cells. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Yeast
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    ABSTRACT: Main conclusion A fungal gene encoding a transcription factor is expressed from its own promoter in Arabidopsis phloem and improves drought tolerance by reducing transpiration and increasing osmotic potential. Horizontal gene transfer from unrelated organisms has occurred in the course of plant evolution, suggesting that some foreign genes may be useful to plants. The CtHSR1 gene, previously isolated from the halophytic yeast Candida tropicalis, encodes a heat-shock transcription factor-related protein. CtHSR1, with expression driven by its own promoter or by the Arabidopsis UBQ10 promoter, was introduced into the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation and the resulting transgenic plants were more tolerant to drought than controls. Fusions of the CtHSR1 promoter with β-glucuronidase reporter gene indicated that this fungal promoter drives expression to phloem tissues. A chimera of CtHSR1 and green fluorescence protein is localized at the cell nucleus. The physiological mechanism of drought tolerance in transgenic plants is based on reduced transpiration (which correlates with decreased opening of stomata and increased levels of jasmonic acid) and increased osmotic potential (which correlates with increased proline accumulation). Transcriptomic analysis indicates that the CtHSR1 transgenic plants overexpressed a hundred of genes, including many relevant to stress defense such as LOX4 (involved in jasmonic acid synthesis) and P5CS1 (involved in proline biosynthesis). The promoters of the induced genes were enriched in upstream activating sequences for water stress induction. These results demonstrate that genes from unrelated organisms can have functional expression in plants from its own promoter and expand the possibilities of useful transgenes for plant biotechnology.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Planta
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    ABSTRACT: The fermenting ability of Saccharomyces at low temperature is crucial for the development of alcoholic beverages, but the key factors for cold tolerance of yeast are not well known. In this report we present results of a screening for genes able to confer cold tolerance by overexpression in a laboratory yeast strain auxotrophic for tryptophan. We identified genes of tryptophan permeases (TAT1 and TAT2), suggesting that the first limiting factor for growth at low temperature of tryptophan-auxotrophic yeast is tryptophan uptake. This fact is of little relevance to industrial strains which are prototrophic for tryptophan. Then we screened for genes able to confer growth at low temperatures in tryptophan-rich medium and found several genes related to phosphate uptake (PHO84, PHO87, PHO90 and GTR1). This suggests that without tryptophan limitation, uptake of inorganic phosphate becomes the limiting factor. We have found that overexpression of the previously uncharacterized ORF YCR015c/CTO1 increases the uptake of inorganic phosphate. Also, genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis (NSG2) cause improvement of growth at 10°C dependent on tryptophan uptake, while the gluconeogenesis gene PCK1 or the proline biosynthesis gene PRO2 cause an improvement in growth at 10°C independent of tryptophan and phosphate uptake. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · FEMS Yeast Research
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    ABSTRACT: Background The increased selection pressure of the herbicide glyphosate has played a role in the evolution of glyphosate-resistance in weedy species, an issue that is becoming a threat to global agriculture. The molecular components involved in the cellular toxicity response to this herbicide at the expression level are still unidentified.ResultsIn this study, we identify the protein kinase GCN2 as a cellular component that fosters the action of glyphosate in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Comparative studies using wild-type and gcn2 knock-out mutant seedlings show that the molecular programme that the plant deploys after the treatment with the herbicide, is compromised in gcn2. Moreover, gcn2 adult plants show a lower inhibition of photosynthesis, and both seedlings and adult gcn2 plants accumulate less shikimic acid than wild-type after treatment with glyphosate.Conclusions These results points to an unknown GCN2-dependent factor involved in the cascade of events triggered by glyphosate in plants. Data suggest either that the herbicide does not equally reach the target-enzyme in a gcn2 background, or that a decreased flux in the shikimate pathway in a gcn2 plants minimize the impact of enzyme inhibition.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · BMC Plant Biology
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    ABSTRACT: The stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) induces expression of defence genes in many organs, modulates ion homeostasis and metabolism in guard cells, and inhibits germination and seedling growth. Concerning the latter effect, several mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with improved capability for H+ efflux (wat1-1D, overexpression of AKT1 and ost2-1D) are less sensitive to inhibition by ABA than the wild type. This suggested that ABA could inhibit H+ efflux (H+-ATPase) and induce cytosolic acidification as a mechanism of growth inhibition. Measurements to test this hypothesis could not be done in germinating seeds and we used roots as the most convenient system. ABA inhibited the root plasma-membrane H+-ATPase measured in vitro (ATP hydrolysis by isolated vesicles) and in vivo (H+ efflux from seedling roots). This inhibition involved the core ABA signalling elements: PYR/PYL/RCAR ABA receptors, ABA-inhibited protein phosphatases (HAB1), and ABA-activated protein kinases (SnRK2.2 and SnRK2.3). Electrophysiological measurements in root epidermal cells indicated that ABA, acting through the PYR/PYL/RCAR receptors, induced membrane hyperpolarization (due to K+ efflux through the GORK channel) and cytosolic acidification. This acidification was not observed in the wat1-1D mutant. The mechanism of inhibition of the H+-ATPase by ABA and its effects on cytosolic pH and membrane potential in roots were different from those in guard cells. ABA did not affect the in vivo phosphorylation level of the known activating site (penultimate threonine) of H+-ATPase in roots, and SnRK2.2 phosphorylated in vitro the C-terminal regulatory domain of H+-ATPase while the guard-cell kinase SnRK2.6/OST1 did not.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · Journal of Experimental Botany
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    ABSTRACT: Membrane-delimited events play a crucial role for ABA signaling and PYR/PYL/RCAR ABA receptors, clade A PP2Cs and SnRK2/CPK kinases modulate the activity of different plasma membrane components involved in ABA action. Therefore, the turnover of PYR/PYL/RCARs in the proximity of plasma membrane might be a step that affects receptor function and downstream signaling. In this study we describe a single subunit RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase RSL1 that interacts with the PYL4 and PYR1 ABA receptors at the plasma membrane. Overexpression of RSL1 reduces ABA sensitivity and rsl1 RNAi lines that impair expression of several members of the RSL1/RFA gene family show enhanced sensitivity to ABA. RSL1 bears a C-terminal transmembrane domain that targets the E3 ligase to plasma membrane. Accordingly, bimolecular fluorescent complementation (BiFC) studies showed the RSL1-PYL4 and RSL1-PYR1 interaction is localized to plasma membrane. RSL1 promoted PYL4 and PYR1 degradation in vivo and mediated in vitro ubiquitylation of the receptors. Taken together, these results suggest ubiquitylation of ABA receptors at plasma membrane is a process that might affect their function via effect on their half-life, protein interactions or trafficking. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · The Plant Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Seed longevity is important to preserve crops and wild plants and it is limited by progressive cellular damage (aging) during storage. The induction of cellular stress defenses and the formation of the seed coat are crucial protecting events during seed development, a process mediated in Arabidopsis thaliana by the transcription factors LEC1, LEC2, FUS3 and the abscisic acid-activated ABI3. In order to identify novel determinants of seed longevity we have screened an activation-tagging mutant collection of Arabidopsis and isolated a dominant mutant with increased seed longevity under both natural and accelerated aging conditions. Molecular characterization indicates that the mutant phenotype is caused by over-expression of the At2g26130 gene encoding a RING-type zinc finger putative ubiquitin ligase. Loss of function of this gene in a T-DNA insertion mutant resulted in decreased seed longevity. We named this important gene for seed longevity RSL1 (from Ring finger of Seed Longevity1) and we could demonstrate ubiquitin ligase activity with the recombinant protein. Morphological alterations in shoot tissues of the RSL1 over-expressing plants and analysis of gibberellins levels suggest that RSL1 may increase gibberellins responses by some unknown mechanism. These results validate the forward genetic approach to seed longevity and anticipate the identification of many novel determinants of this important trait.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014 · Plant Science
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    ABSTRACT: Seed longevity is crucial for agriculture and plant genetic diversity but it is limited by cellular damage during storage. Seeds are protected against aging by cellular defenses and by structures such as the seed coat. We have screened an activation-tagging mutant collection of Arabidopsis thaliana and selected four dominant mutants with improved seed longevity (isl1 to 4-1D) under both natural and accelerated aging conditions. In the isl1-1D mutant, characterized in the present work, over-expression of the transcription factor ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA HOMEOBOX 25 (ATHB25; At5g65410) increases the expression of GIBBERELLIC ACID 3-OXIDASE 2 (GA3OX2), encoding a gibberellins (GA) biosynthetic enzyme, and the levels of GA1 and GA4 are higher (3.2- and 1.4-fold, respectively) in the mutant than in wild type. The morphological and seed longevity phenotypes of the athb25-1D mutant were recapitulated in transgenic plants with moderate (4-6 fold) over-expression of ATHB25. Simultaneous knockdown of ATHB25, ATHB22 and ATHB31 expression decreases seed longevity, as does loss of ATHB25 and ATHB22 function in a double mutant line. Seeds from wild type plants treated with GA and from a quintuple DELLA mutant (with constitutive GA signaling) are more tolerant to aging, providing additional evidence for a role of GA in seed longevity. A correlation was observed in several genotypes between seed longevity and mucilage formation at the seed surface suggesting that GA may act by reinforcing the seed coat. This mechanism was supported by the observation of a maternal effect in reciprocal crosses between wild type and the athb25-1D mutant.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2013 · Plant physiology
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    ABSTRACT: Intracellular pH (pH(i) ) is a crucial parameter in cellular physiology but its mechanisms of homeostasis are only partially understood. To uncover novel roles and participants of the pH(i) regulatory system, we have screened an Arabidopsis mutant collection for resistance of seed germination to intracellular acidification induced by weak organic acids (acetic, propionic, sorbic). The phenotypes of one identified mutant, weak acid tolerant 1-1D (wat1-1D) are due to the expression of a truncated form of AP-3 β adaptin (encoded by the PAT2 gene) that behaviors as dominant-negative. During acetic acid treatment the root epidermal cells of the mutant maintain a higher pH(i) and a more depolarized plasma membrane electrical potential than wild type cells. Additional phenotypes of wat1-1D roots include increased rates of acetate efflux, K(+) uptake and H(+) efflux, the latter reflecting the in vivo activity of the plasma membrane H(+) -ATPase. The in vitro activity of the enzyme was not increased but, as the H(+) -ATPase is electrogenic, the increased ion permeability would allow a higher rate of H(+) efflux. The AP-3 adaptor complex is involved in traffic from Golgi to vacuoles but its function in plants is not much known. The phenotypes of the wat1-1D mutant can be explained if loss of function of the AP-3 β adaptin causes activation of channels or transporters for organic anions (acetate) and for K(+) at the plasma membrane, perhaps through miss-localization of tonoplast proteins. This suggests a role of this adaptin in trafficking of ion channels or transporters to the tonoplast. © 2013 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2013 · The Plant Journal
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    José R Murguía · Ramón Serrano
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    ABSTRACT: The classical role of the conserved Gcn2 kinase of yeast and mammals is to activate the translation of the transcription factors Gcn4 in yeast and activating transcription factor 4 in mammals by phosphorylating the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α. Gcn2 is activated by uncharged tRNAs in response to amino acid starvation and this regulatory system is important for tolerance to nutrient deprivation and other stresses and for development, differentiation, and normal function of mammalian organs. In the past few years, the classical Gcn2 pathway has been shown to modulate life span, tumor cell survival, and immune responses. In addition, Gcn2 modulates translation of novel mRNAs such as those of an unknown regulator of leucine transport and of sulfiredoxin SRX1 in yeast (activation of translation) and of inducible nitric oxide synthase, ErBb2, HIF1a, and 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tract mRNAs in mammals (inhibition of translation). Finally, Gcn2 directly phosphorylates novel proteins such as methionyl-tRNA synthetase in mammals, and this triggers a pathway for DNA repair. These findings anticipate many expanding roles of Gcn2 in the future, with relevance for stress responses and human disease. © 2012 IUBMB IUBMB Life, 2012.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2012 · International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Life
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    ABSTRACT: We have identified QDR2 in a screening for genes able to confer tolerance to sodium and/or lithium stress upon overexpression. Qdr2 is a multidrug transporter of the major facilitator superfamily, originally described for its ability to transport the antimalarial drug quinidine and the herbicide barban. In order to identify its physiological substrate, we have screened for phenotypes dependent on QDR2 and found that Qdr2 is able to transport monovalent and divalent cations with poor selectivity, as shown by growth tests and the determination of internal cation content. Moreover, strains overexpressing or lacking QDR2 also exhibit phenotypes when reactive oxygen species producing agents, such as hydrogen peroxide or menadione, were added to the growth medium. We have also found that the presence of copper and hydrogen peroxide repress the expression of QDR2. In addition, the copper uptake of a qdr2 mutant strain is similar to a wild type, but the extrusion is clearly impaired. Based on our results, we propose that free divalent copper is the main physiological substrate of Qdr2. As copper is a substrate for several redox reactions that occur within the cytoplasm, this function in copper homeostasis explains its role in the oxidative stress response. © 2012 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2012 · FEMS Yeast Research
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    ABSTRACT: Leaf abscission is a common response of plants to drought stress. Some species, such as citrus, have evolved a specific behaviour in this respect, keeping their leaves attached to the plant body during water stress until this is released by irrigation or rain. This study successfully reproduced this phenomenon under controlled conditions (24h of water stress followed by 24h of rehydration) and used it to construct a suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA library enriched in genes involved in the early stages of rehydration-promoted leaf abscission after water stress. Sequencing of the library yielded 314 unigenes, which were spotted onto nylon membranes. Membrane hybridization with petiole (Pet)- and laminar abscission zone (LAZ)-enriched RNA samples corresponding to early steps in leaf abscission revealed an almost exclusive preferential gene expression programme in the LAZ. The data identified major processes such as protein metabolism, cell-wall modification, signalling, control of transcription and vesicle production, and transport as the main biological processes activated in LAZs during the early steps of rehydration-promoted leaf abscission after water stress. Based on these findings, a model for the early steps of citrus leaf abscission is proposed. In addition, it is suggested that CitbHLH1, the putative citrus orthologue of Arabidopsis BIGPETAL, may play major roles in the control of abscission-related events in citrus abscission zones.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2012 · Journal of Experimental Botany
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    ABSTRACT: Intracellular pH must be kept close to neutrality to be compatible with cellular functions, but the mechanisms of pH homeostasis and the responses to intracellular acidification are mostly unknown. In the plant Arabidopsis thaliana, we found that intracellular acid stress generated by weak organic acids at normal external pH induces expression of several chaperone genes, including ROF2, which encodes a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase of the FK506-binding protein class. Loss of function of ROF2, and especially double mutation of ROF2 and the closely related gene ROF1, results in acid sensitivity. Over-expression of ROF2 confers tolerance to intracellular acidification by increasing proton extrusion from cells. The activation of the plasma membrane proton pump (H(+) -ATPase) is indirect: over-expression of ROF2 activates K(+) uptake, causing depolarization of the plasma membrane, which activates the electrogenic H(+) pump. The depolarization of ROF2 over-expressing plants explains their tolerance to toxic cations such as lithium, norspermidine and hygromycin B, whose uptake is driven by the membrane potential. As ROF2 induction and intracellular acidification are common consequences of many stresses, this mechanism of pH homeostasis may be of general importance for stress tolerance.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2012 · The Plant Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Intracellular pH conditions many cellular systems, but its mechanisms of regulation and perception are mostly unknown. We have identified two yeast genes important for tolerance to intracellular acidification caused by weak permeable acids. One corresponded to LEU2 and functions by removing the dependency of the leu2 mutant host strain on uptake of extracellular leucine. Leucine transport is inhibited by intracellular acidification, and either leucine oversupplementation or overexpression of the transporter gene BAP2 improved acid growth. Another acid-tolerance gene is GCN2, encoding a protein kinase activated by uncharged tRNAs during amino acid starvation. Gcn2 phosphorylates eIF2α (eukaryotic initiation factor 2α) (Sui2) at Ser51 and this inhibits general translation, but activates that of Gcn4, a transcription factor for amino acid biosynthetic genes. Intracellular acidification activates Gcn2 probably by inhibition of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases because we observed accumulation of uncharged tRNAleu without leucine depletion. Gcn2 is required for leucine transport and a gcn2-null mutant is sensitive to acid stress if auxotrophic for leucine. Gcn4 is required for neither leucine transport nor acid tolerance, but a S51A sui2 mutant is acid-sensitive. This suggests that Gcn2, by phosphorylating eIF2α, may activate translation of an unknown regulator of amino acid transporters different from Gcn4.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2011 · Biochemical Journal

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2011 · Current Opinion in Biotechnology
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    ABSTRACT: We have investigated the effects of alterations in potassium homeostasis on cell cycle progression and genome stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast strains lacking the PPZ1 and PPZ2 phosphatase genes, which aberrantly accumulate potassium, are sensitive to agents causing replicative stress or DNA damage and present a cell cycle delay in the G(1) /S phase. A synthetic slow growth phenotype was identified in a subset of DNA repair mutants upon inhibition of Ppz activity. Moreover, we observe that this slow growth phenotype observed in cdc7(ts) mutants with reduced Ppz activity is reverted by disrupting the TRK1 potassium transporter gene. As over-expression of a mammalian potassium transporter leads to similar phenotypes, we conclude that these defects can be attributed to potassium accumulation. As we reported previously, internal potassium accumulation activates the Slt2 MAP kinase pathway. We show that the removal of SLT2 in ppz1 ppz2 mutants ameliorates sensitivity to agents causing replication stress and DNA damage, whereas over-activation of the pathway leads to similar cell cycle-related defects. Taken together, these results are consistent with inappropriate potassium accumulation reducing DNA replication efficiency, negatively influencing DNA integrity and leading to the requirement of mismatch repair, the MRX complex, or homologous recombination pathways for normal growth.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2011 · Genes to Cells
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    ABSTRACT: The yeast protein kinases Sat4/Hal4 and Hal5 are required for the plasma membrane stability of the K+ transporter Trk1 and some amino acid and glucose permeases. The transcriptomic analysis presented here indicates alterations in the general control of the metabolism of both nitrogen and carbon. Accordingly, we observed reduced uptake of methionine and leucine in the hal4 hal5 mutant. This decrease correlates with activation of the Gcn2-Gcn4 pathway, as measured by expression of the lacZ gene under the control of the GCN4 promoter. However, with the exception of methionine biosynthetic genes, few amino acid biosynthetic genes are induced in the hal4 hal5 mutant, whereas several genes involved in amino acid catabolism are repressed. Concerning glucose metabolism, we found that this mutant exhibits derepression of respiratory genes in the presence of glucose, leading to an increased activity of mitochondrial enzymes, as measured by succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) activity. In addition, the reduced glucose consumption in the hal4 hal5 mutant correlates with a more acidic intracellular pH and with low activity of the plasma membrane H+-ATPase. As a compensatory mechanism for the low glycolytic rate, the hal4 hal5 mutant overexpresses the HXT4 high-affinity glucose transporter and the hexokinase genes. These results indicate that the hal4 hal5 mutant presents defects in the general control of nitrogen and carbon metabolism, which correlate with reduced transport of amino acids and glucose, respectively. A more acidic intracellular pH may contribute to some defects of this mutant.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2010 · Eukaryotic Cell
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    ABSTRACT: Glucose, in the absence of additional nutrients, induces programmed cell death in yeast. This phenomenon is independent of yeast metacaspase (Mca1/Yca1) and of calcineurin, requires ROS production and it is concomitant with loss of cellular K(+) and vacuolar collapse. K(+) is a key nutrient protecting the cells and this effect depends on the Trk1 uptake system and is associated with reduced ROS production. Mutants with decreased activity of plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase are more tolerant to glucose-induced cell death and exhibit less ROS production. A triple mutant ena1-4 tok1 nha1, devoid of K(+) efflux systems, is more tolerant to both glucose- and H(2)O(2)-induced cell death. We hypothesize that ROS production, activated by glucose and H(+)-ATPase and inhibited by K(+) uptake, triggers leakage of K(+), a process favoured by K(+) efflux systems. Loss of cytosolic K(+) probably causes osmotic lysis of vacuoles. The nature of the ROS-producing system sensitive to K(+) and H(+) transport is unknown.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2010 · Yeast
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    ABSTRACT: Drought is the most important stress experienced by citrus crops. A citrus cDNA microarray of about 6.000 genes has been utilized to identify transcriptomic responses of mandarin to water stress. As observed in other plant species challenged with drought stress, key genes for lysine catabolism, proline and raffinose synthesis, hydrogen peroxide reduction, vacuolar malate transport, RCI2 proteolipids and defence proteins such as osmotin, dehydrins and heat-shock proteins are induced in mandarin. Also, some aquaporin genes are repressed. The osmolyte raffinose could be detected in stressed roots while the dehydrin COR15 protein only accumulated in stressed leaves but not in roots. Novel drought responses in mandarin include the induction of genes encoding a new miraculin isoform, chloroplast beta-carotene hydroxylase, oleoyl desaturase, ribosomal protein RPS13A and protein kinase CTR1. These results suggest that drought tolerance in citrus may benefit from inhibition of proteolysis, activation of zeaxanthin and linolenoyl synthesis, reinforcement of ribosomal structure and down-regulation of the ethylene response.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2009 · Plant Molecular Biology

Publication Stats

6k Citations
460.66 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013-2015
    • University of Valencia
      Valenza, Valencia, Spain
  • 2010-2015
    • Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas (IBMCP)
      Valenza, Valencia, Spain
    • Autonomous University of Barcelona
      • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
      Cerdanyola del Vallès, Catalonia, Spain
  • 1996-2015
    • Institute for Plant Molecular and Cell Biology
      Valenza, Valencia, Spain
  • 1999-2014
    • Spanish National Research Council
      • Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
    • Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research
      Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2007
    • University of Cordoba (Spain)
      Cordoue, Andalusia, Spain
  • 1995-2005
    • Universitat Politècnica de València
      • Institute for Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology (IBCMP)
      Valenza, Valencia, Spain
  • 2002
    • Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche
      Elche, Valencia, Spain
  • 2001
    • University Pompeu Fabra
      • Department of Experimental and Health Sciences
      Barcino, Catalonia, Spain
  • 2000
    • Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 1991
    • European Molecular Biology Laboratory
      Heidelburg, Baden-Württemberg, Germany