Paolo Cavallo Perin

Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Torino, Piedmont, Italy

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Publications (99)436.04 Total impact


  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Acta Diabetologica
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    ABSTRACT: Polypharmacy in older diabetics can have detrimental effects linked to poor adherence and the risk of drug interaction or more serious/frequent side effects. The aim of this study was to identify the characteristics associated with polypharmacy in a cohort of elderly diabetic patients being treated with oral hypoglycemic agents. The study population consisted of 1342 diabetic patients consecutively enrolled in 57 diabetes centers in Italy participating in the METABOLIC Study. Patients meeting the following inclusion criteria were enrolled: diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, age ≥65 years, and receiving oral antidiabetic treatment. Data concerning diabetes duration and complications, the medications the patients were taking, and the number of hypoglycemic events were registered. Multidimensional impairment was assessed using the Multidimensional Prognostic Index. The mean age of the participants was 73.3 ± 5.5 years. Polypharmacy, defined as being prescribed contemporaneously at least five drugs, was found in 57.1 % of the study population. According to a multivariable logistic model, the female gender was significantly associated with polypharmacy, as were living in Northern Italian regions, diabetes duration longer than 4 years, and having a body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2). Comorbidities, diabetes complications, a better cognitive performance on the Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire, and being malnourished/at risk of malnourishment according to the mini nutritional assessment were associated with polypharmacy. Polypharmacy, a condition that may lead to many potential detrimental outcomes in older diabetic subjects, was significantly associated with some risk factors that may be useful to identify subjects at risk.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Acta Diabetologica
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction Elderly patients with coexisting frailty and multiple comorbidities frequently present to the emergency department (ED). Because non-cardiovascular comorbidities and declining health status may affect their life expectancy, management of these patients should start in the ED. This study evaluated the role of Gold Standards Framework (GSF) criteria for identifying patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) approaching end of life. Methods All consecutive patients admitted to the ED and hospitalised with a diagnosis of ACS between May 2012 and July 2012 were included. According to GSF criteria, patients were labelled as positive GSF status when they met at least one general criterion and two heart disease criteria; furthermore, traditional cardiovascular risk scores (the Global Registry for Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) score and the Age, Creatinine and Ejection Fraction (ACEF) score) were calculated and WHOQOL-BREF was assessed. Mortality and repeat hospitalisation due to cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular causes were evaluated at 3-month and 12-month follow-up. Results From a total of 156 patients with ACS enrolled, 22 (14%) had a positive GSF. A positive GSF was associated with higher rate of non-cardiovascular events (22.7% vs 6.7%; p=0.03) at 3 months and higher rates of both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular events (36% vs 16.4%; p=0.04 and 27.3% vs 6.7%; p=0.009, respectively) at 12 months. In multivariate analysis, an in-hospital GRACE score was a predictor of cardiovascular events, while a positive GSF independently predicted non-cardiovascular events. Conclusions The GSF score independently predicts non-cardiovascular events in patients presenting with ACS and may be used along with traditional cardiovascular risk scores in choosing wisely the most appropriate treatment. The present results need to be externally validated on larger samples.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Emergency Medicine Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Effectiveness of sleeve gastrectomy and gastric bypass on glycemic, blood pressure, and lipids control in obese type 2 diabetic patients is poorly known. To assess the effectiveness of bariatric surgery on obese patients with type 2 diabetes. University hospital, Italy. Diabetes remission and metabolic changes over postoperative follow-up were assessed in 135 obese patients with type 2 diabetes who underwent bariatric surgery in 2007-2011 (gastric bypass, n = 100; sleeve gastrectomy, n = 35). Repeated-measures analysis of variance and logistic regression were used. Diabetes remission was observed in 22% and 21.5% of the patients, respectively, 1 and 2 years after surgery. Compared with the remaining patients, patients in diabetes remission were significantly younger, had lower diabetes duration, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose, and frequency of insulin treatment. Trends of HbA1c, body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, and plasma triglycerides revealed a significant decrease over time and the trend of HDL-cholesterol revealed a significant increase over time in both treatment groups (P<.001). Patients reaching target levels for at least 3 out of 5 indicators of intermediate outcomes of care (composite indicator of good diabetes control) were 25.5% at the baseline and 66.1% at final follow-up visit (P<.001). In logistic regression, age (OR = .89, 95% CI .84-.95), HbA1c (OR = .67, 95% CI .49-0.91) and diabetes duration (OR = .87, 95% CI .77-1.00) were independent predictors of diabetes remission. Bariatric surgery is an effective approach to optimize glucose, lipids, and blood pressure control in obese type 2 diabetic patients. Bariatric surgery should be offered earlier over the natural course of diabetes to increase the likelihood of diabetes remission in obese patients. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Few data are available to assess whether a low-moderate reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) has a role per se on cardiovascular (CV) mortality or other biomarkers such as NT-proBNP allow to explain such association. In a prospective study including 1,645 type 2 diabetic subjects of the population-based Casale Monferrato Study, who had no clinical evidence of heart failure and eGFR >45 ml/min/1.73 m2, we examined 6 years CV mortality. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling were used to estimate the effect of NT-proBNP on the association between eGFR and mortality, independently of baseline CV risk factors, albumin excretion rate (AER) and C-reactive protein (CRP). During follow-up, 327 people died (149 of CV diseases) out of 8334.5 person-years. Compared to eGFR≥90 ml/min/1.73 m2, values of 60-89 and 45-59 ml/min/1.73 m2 conferred a fully adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of CV mortality of 1.74 (1.08-2.82) and 1.95 (1.03-3.68), respectively. After further adjustment for NT-proBNP, however, HRs were no longer significant (HRs 1.42, 0.83-2.42 and 1.22, 0.59-2.51). In this model, HR for logNT-proBNP was 1.84 (1.52-2.22). Adding NT-proBNP to the model improved the C-statistic of CV mortality from 0.79 (0.76-0.83) to 0.84 (0.81-0.87), yielded an IDI of 0.03 (p = 0.02), and a NRI of 0.44 (p = 0.016). In diabetic people a modest reduction in renal function increased 6-year CV mortality independently of albuminuria. This association, however, was mainly explained by the effect of NT-proBNP, that remained the strongest prognostic marker for a worse CV outcome, even after adjustment for other CV risk factors and pre-existing CVD.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2014 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Background Both metabolic syndrome (MetS) and NT-proBNP confer increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). We assessed if NT-proBNP levels were greater in people with uncomplicated MetS, who had neither CVD/chronic kidney disease (CKD) nor diabetes, as compared to subjects who met none of the defining criteria of the MetS.MethodsA case-cohort study from the non-diabetic population-based Casale Monferrato Study was performed, after exclusion of all subjects with established CVD, CKD (eGFR < 60 ml/min/1.73 m2) and CRP values ≥3 mg/l. Cases (n = 161) with MetS were compared to all subjects within the cohort (n = 124) who were completely free of any component of the MetS. Serum NT-proBNP were centrally measured by immunoenzymatic assay.ResultsNT-proBNP levels were significantly higher in cases than in control subjects [35.4 (15.5-98.2) vs 24.4 (11.7-49.6) pg/ml, p = 0.014]. In logistic regression analysis, compared to NT-proBNP values in the lower quartiles (≤49.64 pg/ml), higher values conferred OR 4.17 (1.30-13.44) of having the MetS, independently of age, sex, microalbuminuria, CRP, eGFR, and central obesity. This association was evident even after the exclusion of hypertensive subjects. Further adjustment for log-HOMA and diastolic blood pressure did not modify the strength of the association, while central obesity was a negative confounder.Conclusions Compared to people without any component of the MetS, those with uncomplicated MetS, who had neither CVD/CKD nor diabetes, had increased NT-proBNP values, even if they were normotensive and though absolute values were still in the low range. The insulin-resistance state did not mediate this association, while central obesity was a negative confounder. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews
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    ABSTRACT: Aims/hypothesis: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to abrogate in vitro the proinflammatory response in type 1 diabetes. The mechanism involves paracrine factors, which may include microvesicles (MVs). We evaluated whether MVs derived from heterologous bone-marrow MSCs exert an immunomodulatory effect on T cell responses against GAD (glutamic acid decarboxylase) antigen in type 1 diabetes. Methods: MVs were purified from heterologous human MSCs by differential centrifugation. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were obtained from patients with type 1 diabetes at disease onset, and responses to GAD65 stimulation were assessed by IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot analysis. Levels of cytokines and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) were measured in the supernatant fraction, and T helper 17 (Th17) and regulatory T cell analysis was performed. Results: MVs were internalised by PBMCs, as assessed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analyses. MVs significantly decreased IFN-γ spots and levels in GAD65-stimulated PBMCs, and significantly increased transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), IL-10, IL-6 and PGE2 levels. Furthermore, MVs decreased the number of Th17 cells and the levels of IL-17, and increased FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells in GAD65-stimulated PBMCs. Conclusions/interpretation: These results provide evidence that MSC-derived MVs can inhibit in vitro a proinflammatory response to an islet antigenic stimulus in type 1 diabetes. The action of MVs involves PGE2 and TGF-β signalling pathways and IL-10 secretion, suggesting a switch to an anti-inflammatory response of T cells.
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Diabetologia
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    ABSTRACT: Among people with type 2 diabetes the relationship between central obesity and cardiovascular mortality has not been definitely assessed. Moreover, NT-proBNP is negatively associated with central obesity, but no study has examined their combined effect on survival. We have examined these issues in a well-characterized population-based cohort. Survival data of 2272 diabetic people recruited in 2000 who had no other chronic disease have been updated to 31 December 2006. NT-proBNP was measured in a subgroup of 1690 patients. Cox proportional hazards modeling was employed to estimate the independent associations between cardiovascular and all-cause mortality and waist circumference. Mean age was 67.9 years, 49.3% were men. Both age and NT-proBNP were negatively correlated with waist circumference (r = -0.11, p<0.001 and r = -0.07, p = 0.002). Out of 2272 subjects, 520 deaths (221 for CV mortality) occurred during a median follow-up of 5.4 years. Central obesity was not associated with CV mortality (hazard ratio, HR, adjusted for age, sex, diabetes duration, 1.14, 95% CI 0.86-1.52). NTproBNP was a negative confounder and age a strong modifier of this relationship (p for interaction<0.001): age<70 years, fully adjusted model HR = 3.52 (1.17-10.57) and age ≥70 years, HR = 0.80 (0.46-1.40). Respective HRs for all-cause mortality were 1.86 (1.03-3.32) and 0.73 (0.51-1.04). In diabetic people aged 70 years and lower, central obesity was independently associated with increased cardiovascular mortality, independently of the negative effect of NT-proBNP. In contrast, no effect on 6-years survival was evident in diabetic people who have yet survived up to 70 years.
    Preview · Article · May 2014 · PLoS ONE
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    A Pilotto · M Noale · S Maggi · F Addante · A Tiengo · P Cavallo Perin · G Rengo · G Crepaldi
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: To identify the characteristics associated with multidimensional impairment, evaluated through the Multidimensional Prognostic Index (MPI), a validated predictive tool for mortality derived from a standardized Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA), in a cohort of elderly diabetic patients treated with oral hypoglycemic drugs. Methods and results: The study population consisted of 1342 diabetic patients consecutively enrolled in 57 diabetes centers distributed throughout Italy, within the Metabolic Study. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), 65 years old or over, and treatment with oral antidiabetic medications. Data concerning DM duration, medications for DM taken during the 3-month period before inclusion in the study, number of hypoglycemic events, and complications of DM were collected. Multidimensional impairment was assessed using the MPI evaluating functional, cognitive, and nutritional status; risk of pressure sores; comorbidity; number of drugs taken; and cohabitation status. The mean age of participants was 73.3 ± 5.5 years, and the mean MPI score was 0.22 ± 0.13. Multivariate analysis showed that advanced age, female gender, hypoglycemic events, and hospitalization for glycemic decompensation were independently associated with a worse MPI score. Conclusion: Stratification of elderly diabetic patients using the MPI might help to identify those patients at highest risk who need better-tailored treatment.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014
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    ABSTRACT: MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-protein-encoding RNAs, regulate gene expression via suppression of target mRNAs. MiRNAs are present in body fluids in a remarkable stable form as packaged in microvesicles of endocytic origin, named exosomes. In the present study, we have assessed miRNA expression in urinary exosomes from type 1 diabetic patients with and without incipient diabetic nephropathy. Results showed that miR-130a and miR-145 were enriched, while miR-155 and miR-424 reduced in urinary exosomes from patients with microalbuminuria. Similarly, in an animal model of early experimental diabetic nephropathy, urinary exosomal miR-145 levels were increased and this was paralleled by miR-145 overexpression within the glomeruli. Exposure of cultured mesangial cells to high glucose increased miR-145 content in both mesangial cells and mesangial cells-derived exosomes, providing a potential mechanism for diabetes-induced miR-145 overexpression. In conclusion, urinary exosomal miRNA content is altered in type 1 diabetic patients with incipient diabetic nephropathy and miR-145 may represent a novel candidate biomarker/player in the complication.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2013 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE Type 2 diabetes mellitus and associated chronic kidney disease (CKD) have become major public health problems. Little is known about the influence of diet on the incidence or progression of CKD among individuals with type 2 diabetes. OBJECTIVE To examine the association between (healthy) diet, alcohol, protein, and sodium intake, and incidence or progression of CKD among individuals with type 2 diabetes. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS All 6213 individuals with type 2 diabetes without macroalbuminuria from the Ongoing Telmisartan Alone and in Combination With Ramipril Global Endpoint Trial (ONTARGET) were included in this observational study. Recruitment spanned from January 2002 to July 2003, with prospective follow-up through January 2008. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Chronic kidney disease was defined as new microalbuminuria or macroalbuminuria or glomerular filtration rate decline of more than 5% per year at 5.5 years of follow-up. We assessed diet using the modified Alternate Healthy Eating Index (mAHEI). The analyses were adjusted for known risk factors, and competing risk of death was considered. RESULTS After 5.5 years of follow-up, 31.7% of participants had developed CKD and 8.3% had died. Compared with participants in the least healthy tertile of mAHEI score, participants in the healthiest tertile had a lower risk of CKD (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.74; 95% CI, 0.64-0.84) and lower risk of mortality (OR, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.48-0.78). Participants consuming more than 3 servings of fruits per week had a lower risk of CKD compared with participants consuming these food items less frequently. Participants in the lowest tertile of total and animal protein intake had an increased risk of CKD compared with participants in the highest tertile (total protein OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.05-1.30). Sodium intake was not associated with CKD. Moderate alcohol intake reduced the risk of CKD (OR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.65-0.87) and mortality (OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.53-0.89). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE A healthy diet and moderate intake of alcohol may decrease the incidence or progression of CKD among individuals with type 2 diabetes. Sodium intake, within a wide range, and normal protein intake are not associated with CKD. TRIAL REGISTRATION clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00153101.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2013 · JAMA Internal Medicine
  • P. Villois · M. Tricarico · G. Gruden · P. Cavallo Perin
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    ABSTRACT: Silicone breast implants have an elastomer silicone shell filled with viscous silicone gel. There is still debate about the possible occurrence of systemic complications of silicone prosthesis implantation. On the contrary, local complications, such as capsular contracture and breast implant rupture, are well documented. Implant rupture, which is often silent, results in either intracapsular or extracapsular leaking of the silicone gel. There have been sporadic reports of breast implant rupture with systemic silicon spread; however, mechanisms and consequences of systemic silicone migration are still poorly understood. Herein, we report the case of a 70 years old woman, who had idiopatic acute pericarditis with anterior pericardial thickening and modest pericardial effusion and concomitant evidence of silicone lymphadenopathy. Specifically, the patient, who had had bilateral breast augmentation with silicone implants for cosmetic purposes 35 years earlier, had bilateral breast implant rupture, ipsilateral both intra-mammarian and axillary reactive lymph nodes, and bilateral lymphadenopathy of the internal mammary chain. Ultrasounds showed that one of the axillary lymph nodes had a "snowstorm" appearance, which is considered a silicone signature. Following surgical breast prosthesis removal, there was complete resolution of both pericarditis and lymphadenopathy. This clinical report underscore the importance of both screening of silent ruptures and rapid surgical removal of failed implants.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2013
  • E Pagano · A Gray · R Rosato · G Gruden · P Cavallo Perin · F Merletti · G Bruno
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    ABSTRACT: Aims/hypothesis: The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS) Outcomes Model can be used to estimate the lifetime occurrence of major diabetes-related complications in order to calculate health economic outcomes. The aim of the study was to assess the performance of the model by comparing the predicted and observed mortality and the incidence of macrovascular complications in an Italian population-based cohort with type 2 diabetes. Methods: We used data from the Casale Monferrato Survey, a cohort enrolled in 1988 and surveyed in 1991 (n = 1,967) to assess the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors. In 2000, a new survey included all the members of the original cohort who were still alive (n = 860), and in addition all individuals identified with a new diagnosis of type 2 diabetes since 1993 (n = 2,389). We compared the mortality predicted by the model for the 1991 survey over the subsequent 17-year period with the observed risk. The following outcomes were analysed in the 2000 survey: myocardial infarction (MI), other ischaemic heart disease, stroke, congestive heart failure (CHF) and amputation. Results: For all-cause mortality, the predictions from the model at 5 and 10 years (23% and 47%, respectively) were identical to the observed risks. At 15 years, the risk of death was slightly overestimated (an estimate of 67% vs 64% observed, 95% CI 61%, 66%). The performance of the model was best for patients with a recent history of disease (duration <6 years). Among the complications, the predicted cumulative incidences of MI and CHF were very close to those observed. Conclusions/interpretation: External validation is essential to assess the accuracy of simulation models. The UKPDS Outcomes Model satisfactorily predicted a set of actual incidences of mortality and complications in an Italian diabetes cohort up to a duration of approximately 12 years. The longer term performance of such models should be carefully evaluated.
    No preview · Article · May 2013 · Diabetologia
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Available data about mortality of type 2 diabetic patients treated with different sulfonylureas are scarce and contradictory. Design: We evaluated the associations between all-cause and cause-specific mortality and treatments with different sulfonylureas in a retrospective cohort of type 2 diabetic patients from a diabetes clinic. Methods: All 1277 patients treated with sulfonylureas during 1996-1997 were enrolled: 159 patients were treated with tolbutamide, 977 glibenclamide, and 141 gliclazide. The baseline data (centralised laboratory parameters, anthropometric data, presence of chronic complications) were abstracted from the clinical records. Information on vital status were collected from demographic files after 14-year-follow-up. Adjusted hazard ratios were estimated with Cox (all-cause mortality) or Fine and Gray models (cause-specific mortality), including several potential confounders. Results: 556 patients died during the follow-up: 262 from cardiovascular causes, 158 from cancer, and 136 from other causes. When compared to the glibenclamide-users, the gliclazide- and tolbutamide-users showed a significantly lower cancer mortality (HR=0.30;95%CI 0.16-0.55, and HR=0.48;95%CI 0.29-0.79, respectively). These results were strongly confirmed in the 555 patients on sulfonylurea-monotherapy. None of the patients who were treated with gliclazide monotherapy died from cancer during the follow-up, and the patients on tolbutamide exhibited a lower cancer mortality than the glibenclamide-users (HR=0.40;95%CI 0.22-0.71). Data did not change after stratification for the duration of sulfonylurea treatment from diabetes diagnosis to the study enrolment. CONCLUSIONS: Cancer mortality was markedly reduced in the patients on gliclazide and tolbutamide. These results suggest additional benefits for these drugs beyond their blood glucose-lowering effect and strongly advocate for further investigation.
    Full-text · Article · May 2013 · European Journal of Endocrinology
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE To study whether NH2-terminal probrain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a short-term independent predictor of both all-cause and cardiovascular (CV) mortality in type 2 diabetic patients and to establish whether albuminuria and C-reactive protein (CRP) affect this relationship.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The prospective study included 1,825 type 2 diabetic patients from the population-based cohort of the Casale Monferrato study. CV risk factors, preexisting CVD, and NT-proBNP levels were evaluated at baseline. All-cause and CV mortality were assessed 5.5 years after baseline examination. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to estimate mortality hazard ratios (HRs).RESULTSDuring the follow-up period, 390 people died (175 for CVD) out of 9,101 person-years of observations. A significantly increased mortality risk by quartiles of NT-proBNP was observed (test for trend, P < 0.001). NT-proBN P values >91 pg/mL conferred HRs of 2.05 (95% CI 1.47-2.86) for all-cause and 4.47 (2.38-8.39) for CV mortality, independently of CV risk factors, including CRP and albumin excretion rate (AER). The association was also significant for modest rises in NT-proBNP levels and in patients without microalbuminuria and CVD at baseline (upper quartiles HRs 3.82 [95% CI 1.24-13.75]) and 3.14 [1.00-9.94]). Albuminuria and NT-proBNP had an additive effect on mortality, though the association was stronger for NT-proBNP.CONCLUSIONSNT-proBNP is a strong independent predictor of short-term CV mortality risk in elderly people with type 2 diabetes, including those without preexisting CVD. This association is evident even in people with slightly increased values, is not modified by CRP, and is additive to that provided by AER.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2013 · Diabetes care
  • S Maggi · M Noale · A Pilotto · A Tiengo · P. Cavallo Perin · G Crepaldi
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    ABSTRACT: Aim: The objective of the METABOLIC Study was to evaluate overall health status, with particular focus on assessment of functional status of older patients taking oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) treatment. Methods: The study included 1342 type 2 diabetes patients aged ≥ 65 years treated with OADs, with or without insulin, who had been referred to outpatients clinics across Italy. Information on diabetes (duration, medications taken during the last 3 months, hypoglycaemic events and diabetic complications) was collected by questionnaire, and the patients' overall health status was assessed using a multidimensional prognostic index. Results: The sample recruited (mean age: 73.3 ± 5.5 years) had a mean duration of diabetes of 11.3 ± 8.2 years. Half were taking sulphonylureas alone or together with other medications, 9.7% were taking insulin in combination with other OADs, almost 30% were using biguanides and 6.2% were taking dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors. Also, 12% of patients reported hypoglycaemic events, 90% of whom were taking insulin or sulphonylureas. In addition, 81% of the participants were completely independent in their activities of daily living, while 19% were mildly, moderately or severely disabled. Age, female gender, hypoglycaemic events, neuropathy and low diastolic blood pressure were the main variables associated with disability. Conclusion: Disability is common in older diabetic patients and some associated factors, such as hypoglycaemia and low diastolic blood pressure, have been identified. Also identified was malnutrition as a specific factor associated with hypoglycaemic events independent of the use of insulin and sulphonylureas.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2013 · Diabetes & Metabolism
  • M Trento · F Panero · M Porta · G Gruden · F Barutta · F Cerutti · R Gambino · M Perotto · P Cavallo Perin · G Bruno
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    ABSTRACT: Background and aims: Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) affects young people during the most active years of their life. Our aim was to assess quality of life (QoL) and associated variables in a large cohort of adults with childhood-onset and adult-onset T1DM. Methods: A cohort of adult patients (18 years and older) from the T1DM Registry of Turin, Italy, was recruited. Clinical characteristics and Diabetes QoL (DQOL) questionnaire were assessed by standardized procedures. Results: 310 adults completed the questionnaire. Age and diabetes duration at assessment (mean ± SD) were 32.8 ± 7.3 years and 17.3 ± 6.3 years, respectively. DQOL and its subscores were in the lower quartiles of their distributions, indicating a good level of QoL. However, scores were significantly higher in females than in males, particularly for the subscale of diabetes-related worries. In multivariate analysis, lower QoL was independently associated with female sex (β = 1.07, 95% CI 1.03-1.11, p = 0.003), higher age at onset (β = 1.03, 1.00-1.05, p = 0.009), lower schooling (β = 1.05, 1.00-1.09, p = 0.02), higher fasting plasma glucose (β = 1.03, 1.01-1.05, p = 0.008), daily SMBG >4 (β = 1.06, 1.01-1.10, p = 0.01), severe hypoglycemia over the last year (β = 1.06, 1.01-1.11, p = 0.02), lower numbers of diabetologic visits (β = 1.07, 1.01-1.13, p = 0.02) and hypertension (β = 1.06, 1.02-1.10, p = 0.005). Autonomic neuropathy was associated with diabetes impact. Female sex (β = 4.36, 2.43-7.83) and daily SMBG >4 (β = 3.77, 1.72-8.30) were independently associated with worst level and CSII with better level (β = 0.22, 0.07-0.68) of diabetes-related worries. Conclusions: The impact of T1DM on QoL may depend on demographic, metabolic control-related variables, presence of complications and insulin delivery modality.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2013 · Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases: NMCD
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    Gabriella Gruden · Federica Barutta · Paolo Cavallo Perin · Graziella Bruno

    Preview · Article · Dec 2012 · Diabetes care
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    ABSTRACT: Levels of serum heat shock protein 27 (sHsp27) have been studied in numerous cancer types, but their potential relevance in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is undetermined. Our aim was to compare sHsp27 levels in patients with HCC and HCC-free controls. Specifically, we recruited 71 patients with HCC (80 % with early tumour), 80 patients with chronic liver disease (59 with liver cirrhosis and 21 with chronic active hepatitis) and 42 healthy subjects. sHsp27 was measured by immunoenzymatic assay. Results showed that sHsp27 levels were significantly (p < 0.001) higher in patients with HCC than in the other groups, particularly in those with hepatitis C virus (HCV)-related disease. In HCC patients, sHsp27 levels were not associated with prognostic risk factors, such as size/multiplicity of nodules and stage. In logistic regression analysis, performed in patients with liver disease, log-sHsp27 was associated with a significant age-adjusted 2.5-fold increased odds ratio of HCC and with a significant 4.4-fold higher odds ratio of HCC in the subgroup with HCV-related liver disease. In receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, sensitivity and specificity of the best sHsp27 cut-off value (456.5 pg/ml) for differentiating patients with HCC from those with HCC-free chronic liver disease were 70 and 73 %, respectively. In conclusion, sHsp27 levels are enhanced in patients with HCC and may represent a candidate biomarker of HCC.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2012 · Cell Stress and Chaperones
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    R Mastrocola · F Barutta · S Pinach · G Bruno · P.Cavallo Perin · G Gruden
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    ABSTRACT: Hippocampal abnormalities are believed to increase the risk of cognitive decline in diabetic patients. The underlying mechanism is unknown, but both hyperglycemia and oxidative stress have been implicated. Cellular stresses induce the expression of heat shock protein 25 (HSP25) and this results in cytoprotection. Our aim was to assess hippocampal expression of HSP25 in experimental diabetes. Mice were rendered diabetic by streptozotocin injection. Ten weeks after diabetes onset hippocampal HSP25 expression was studied by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, nitrotyrosine, iNOS, HSP72, HSP90, and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) was assessed by either IHC or immunoblotting, Cu/Zn-SOD activity by enzymatic assay, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content by colorimetric assay. Hippocampal HSP25 was significantly increased in diabetic as compared to non-diabetic animals and localized predominantly within the pyramidal neurons layer of the CA1 area. This was paralleled by overexpression of nitrotyrosine, iNOS, SOD expression/activity, and enhanced MDA content. In experimental diabetes, HSP25 is overexpressed in the CA1 pyramidal neurons in parallel with markers of oxidative stress.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2012 · Neuroscience

Publication Stats

2k Citations
436.04 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2015
    • Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino
      • Department of General and Specialized Medicine
      Torino, Piedmont, Italy
  • 1995-2015
    • Università degli Studi di Torino
      • Department of Medical Science
      Torino, Piedmont, Italy
  • 2007
    • Università degli Studi dell'Insubria
      Varese, Lombardy, Italy
  • 1999
    • Ospedale San Giovanni Battista, ACISMOM
      Torino, Piedmont, Italy