M. Mathaj

Universität Potsdam, Potsdam, Brandenburg, Germany

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Publications (3)2.63 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Small livestock is an important resource for rural human populations in dry climates. How strongly will climate change affect the capacity of the rangeland? We used hierarchical modelling to scale quantitatively the growth of shrubs and annual plants, the main food of sheep and goats, to the landscape extent in the eastern Mediterranean region. Without grazing, productivity increased in a sigmoid way with mean annual precipitation. Grazing reduced productivity more strongly the drier the landscape. At a point just under the stocking capacity of the vegetation, productivity declined precipitously with more intense grazing due to a lack of seed production of annuals. We repeated simulations with precipitation patterns projected by two contrasting IPCC scenarios. Compared to results based on historic patterns, productivity and stocking capacity did not differ in most cases. Thus, grazing intensity remains the stronger impact on landscape productivity in this dry region even in the future.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2008 · Regional Environmental Change
  • M. Köchy · M. Mathaj · F. Jeltsch · D. Malkinson
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Small livestock is an important resource for rural human populations in dry climates. How strongly will climate change affect the capacity of the rangeland? We used hierarchical modelling to scale quantitatively the growth of shrubs and annual plants, the main food of sheep and goats, to the landscape extent in the eastern Mediterranean region. Without grazing, productivity increased in a sigmoid way with mean annual precipitation. Grazing reduced productivity more strongly the drier the landscape. At a point just under the stocking capacity of the vegetation, productivity declined precipitously with more intense grazing due to a lack of seed production of annuals. We repeated simulations with precipitation patterns projected by two contrasting IPCC scenarios. Compared to results based on historic patterns, productivity and stocking capacity did not differ in most cases. Thus, grazing intensity remains the stronger impact on landscape productivity in this dry region even in the future.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2008
  • M. Mathaj · F. Jeltsch · M. Köchy

    No preview · Conference Paper · Jan 2006

Publication Stats

40 Citations
2.63 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008
    • Universität Potsdam
      • Institute of Biochemistry and Biology
      Potsdam, Brandenburg, Germany