Masood Masoodian

The University of Waikato, Hamilton City, Waikato, New Zealand

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Publications (96)8.51 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: A serious game is presented which embodies an approach to disease prevention and management that is community-based and incorporates principles of the One Health framework-a broader view of healthcare that encompasses people, animals and the environment. The game focuses specifically on two related neglected and emerging infectious tropical diseases, namely Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) and American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (ACL). It seeks to inform and encourage changes in behaviours and attitudes in local populations, while involving multidisciplinary teams of healthcare professionals and researchers. The design of the learning outcomes, gameplay, client interface, and architecture of the game are discussed in detail, along with the process of collaboration among a team of computer scientists, designers, medical researchers, and practitioners which underpinned the development of the game. An expert study conducted to gather feedback from a multidisciplinary group of participants comprising medical researchers, veterinarians, healthcare service administrators, and community healthcare providers is presented which forms part of our initial assessment of this approach. The results of this study and their implications for the design of similar health-related serious games are also discussed.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Entertainment Computing
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    Chi Tai Dang · Masood Masoodian · Elisabeth André
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    ABSTRACT: Large interactive displays provide potential platforms for collaborative visualizations to support groups of co-located people in interacting with shared information spaces. In these settings, it is often necessary to provide the individuals with their own private views of the shared visualizations. In this paper, we present a prototype system that allows users to get private views of their areas of interest (i.e. focus) within the larger shared visualizations (i.e. context) displayed on tabletop surfaces through portals provided on mobile devices. We demonstrate the potential of this system for visualization of collective and personal energy consumption data with the aim of supporting smart energy applications.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Sep 2015
  • M. Masoodian · S. Luz · M. Cesario · R.R. Cesario · B. Rogers · D.A. Borges
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    ABSTRACT: Community-based healthcare strategies are becoming increasingly important in developing sustainable practices for prevention of neglected and emerging diseases in remote regions. In this paper, we discuss the use of 'serious games' as one of the strategies for improving local populations' knowledge of the causes, preventive measures, and treatment options for neglected tropical diseases. We illustrate the potential of such a strategy for fostering engagement between local communities and healthcare workers by presenting a serious game architecture we have developed in collaboration with medical researchers and practitioners working in Amazonia. Although this first game focuses on Leishmaniases, it can be extended to easily include other similar diseases. This prototype game has been presented to a group of experts on neglected tropical diseases, and their opinions are reported here.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015
  • Masood Masoodian · Birgit Lugrin · René Bühling · Elisabeth André

    No preview · Conference Paper · Jan 2015
  • Saturnino Luz · Masood Masoodian · Manuel Cesario
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    ABSTRACT: The development and deployment of information technology, particularly mobile tools, to support collaboration between different groups of health-care professionals has been viewed as a promising way to improve disease surveillance and patient care in remote regions. The effects of global climate change combined with rapid changes to land cover and use in Amazonia are believed to be contributing to the spread of vector-borne emerging and neglected diseases. This makes empowering and providing support for local health-care providers all the more important. We investigate the use of information technology in this context to support professionals whose activities range from diagnosing diseases and monitoring their spread to developing policies to deal with outbreaks. An analysis of stakeholders, their roles and requirements, is presented which encompasses results of fieldwork and of a process of design and prototyping complemented by questionnaires and targeted interviews. Findings are analysed with respect to the tasks of diagnosis, training of local health-care professionals, and gathering, sharing and visualisation of data for purposes of epidemiological research and disease surveillance. Methodological issues regarding the elicitation of cooperation and collaboration requirements are discussed and implications are drawn with respect to the use of technology in tackling emerging and neglected diseases.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · Behaviour and Information Technology
  • M. Masoodian · A. b. M. Yusof · B. Rogers
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    ABSTRACT: Creating complex 3D models is a challenging process. One of the main reasons for this is that 3D models are usually created using software developed for conventional 2D displays which lack true depth perspective, and therefore do not support correct perception of spatial placement and depth-ordering of displayed content. As a result, modellers often have to deal with many overlapping components of 3D models (e.g. vertices, edges, faces, etc.) on a 2D display surface. This in turn causes them to have difficulties in distinguishing distances, maintaining position and orientation awareness, etc. To better understand the nature of these problems, which can collectively be defined as ‘focus and context awareness’ problems, we have conducted a pilot study with a group of novice 3D modellers, and a series of interviews with a group of professional 3D modellers. This article presents these two studies, and their findings, which have resulted in identifying a set of focus and context awareness problems that modellers face in creating 3D models using conventional modelling software. The article also provides a review of potential solutions to these problems in the related literature.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Interacting with Computers
  • S. Luz · M. Masoodian · M. Cesario · R.R. Cesario · B. Rogers
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    ABSTRACT: Many developing regions around the world rely on community-based healthcare strategies and practices to deal with prevention and control of often neglected diseases, by educating the local population and healthcare professionals, on the mechanisms by which such diseases spread and how they can be controlled. In this paper we describe a multiplayer serious game designed to raise awareness, and foster adoption of preventive measures among local citizens and community-health professionals about Leishmaniosis. We also discuss how the underlying concept for this game and its mechanics have been iteratively designed and developed in collaboration with a group of people with relevant medical and research expertise as well as practical knowledge resulting from working with our target population.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014
  • M. Masoodian · A. b. Mohd Yusof · B. Rogers
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    ABSTRACT: Most 3D modelling software have been developed for conventional 2D displays, and as such, lack support for true depth perception. This contributes to making polygonal 3D modelling tasks challenging, particularly when models are complex and consist of a large number of overlapping components (e.g. vertices, edges) and objects (i.e. parts). Research has shown that users of 3D modelling software often encounter a range of difficulties, which collectively can be defined as focus and context awareness problems. These include maintaining position and orientation awarenesses, as well as recognizing distance between individual components and objects in 3D spaces. In this paper, we present five visualization and interaction techniques we have developed for multi-layered displays, to better support focus and context awareness in 3D modelling tasks. The results of a user study we conducted shows that three of these five techniques improve users' 3D modelling task performance.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Computer Graphics Forum
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    ABSTRACT: Today’s building automation systems must be capable of dealing with a large number of simultaneously occurring events. Human operators monitor these events in order to maintain situational awareness, to detect physical intrusion or hardware problems, and other irregularities. We transferred the so-called temporal mosaic charts to building environments and compared their use with entropy-enriched Gantt charts and classical logfile analysis.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Sep 2014
  • Simon Laing · Masood Masoodian
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    ABSTRACT: Existing computer technologies poorly support the ideation phase common to graphic design practice. Finding and indexing visual material to assist the process of ideation often fall on the designer, leading to user experiences that are less than ideal. To inform development of computer systems to assist graphic designers in the ideation phase of the design process, we conducted interviews with 15 professional graphic designers about their design process and visual information needs. Based on the study, we propose a set of requirements for an ideation-support system for graphic design.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology
  • Saturnino Luz · Masood Masoodian
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigates the readability (interpretability) of information presented on a geographical map onto which a semi-transparent multivariate selection layer has been overlaid. The investigation is based on an information visualization prototype developed for a mobile platform (tablet devices) which aimed at supporting epidemiologists and medical staff in field data collection and epidemiological interpretation tasks. Different factors are analysed under varying transparency (alpha blending) levels, including: map interpretation task (covering "seeing map" and "reading map" tasks), legend symbol and map area type. Our results complement other studies that focused on the readability characteristics of items displayed on semi-transparent foreground layers developed in the context of "toolglass" interfaces. The implications of these results to the usability of transparency variable selection layers in geographical map applications are also discussed.
    No preview · Article · May 2014
  • Matthew Jervis · Masood Masoodian
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose ‐ This article aims to describe how people manage to integrate their use of paper and electronic documents in modern office work environments. Design/methodology/approach ‐ An observational interview type study of 14 participants from 11 offices in eight organizations was conducted. Recorded data were analysed using a thematic analysis method. This involved reading and annotation of interview transcripts, categorizing, linking and connecting, corroborating, and producing an account of the study. Findings ‐ The findings of the study can be categorized into four groups: the roles paper and electronic documents serve in today's offices, the ways in which these documents are managed, the problems associated with their management, and the types of fragmentation that exist in terms of their management and how these are dealt with. Practical implications ‐ The study has identified the need for better integrated management of paper and electronic documents in present-day offices. The findings of the study have then been used to propose a set of guidelines for the development of integrated paper and electronic document management systems. Originality/value ‐ Although similar studies of offices have been conducted in the past, almost all of these studies are prior to the widespread use of mobile and network-based shared technologies in office environments. Furthermore, previous studies have generally failed to identify and propose guidelines for integration of paper and electronic document management systems.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2014
  • M. Masoodian · E. André · S. Luz · T. Rist
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    ABSTRACT: There is an increasing need for technology that assist people with more effective monitoring and management of their energy generation and consumption. In recent years a considerable number of research activities have resulted in a multitude of new ICT-supported tools and services for both the private energy consumer market, as well as for energy related business and industries (e.g., utility and grid companies, facility management, etc.). This workshop focuses on advanced interaction, interface, and visualization techniques for energy-related applications, tools, and services. It brings together researchers and practitioners from a diverse range of background, including interaction design, human-computer interaction, visualization, computer games, and other fields concerned with the development of advanced visual interfaces for smart energy applications.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2014
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    ABSTRACT: In recent years a growing number of information visualization systems have been developed to assist users with monitoring their energy consumption, with the hope of reducing energy use through more effective user-awareness. Most of these visualizations can be categorized into either some form of a time-series or pie chart, each with their own limitations. These visualization systems also often ignore incorporating contextual (e.g. weather, environmental) information which could assist users with better interpretation of their energy use information. In this paper we introduce the time-pie visualization technique, which combines the concepts of timeseries and pie charts, and allows the addition of contextual information to energy consumption data.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jul 2013
  • Matthew Jervis · Masood Masoodian
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    ABSTRACT: Electronic cataloguing systems are used by libraries to provide search mechanisms for finding books in their collections. These systems provide limited, if any, tools for browsing content electronically in a manner similar to browsing books on physical library shelves. Furthermore, library patrons often struggle to physically locate and retrieve books, even after they have found what they are looking for using library catalogue systems. A number of prototype technologies have been developed in recent years to assist library users with the task of locating books. These systems are, however, rather limited in their functionality, and generally do not provide tools for remote browsing of library shelves. In this paper we introduce Metis, a system designed to allow virtual viewing of collections, and to assist with physical retrieval of books using a range of desktop and mobile computing devices.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Jun 2013
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    ABSTRACT: As telehealth systems are increasingly being adopted by healthcare providers, a growing number of medical practitioners need to learn to use such systems. Despite this, however, most medical schools do not currently include telehealth-related content in their curriculum. In this paper we demonstrate, through examples from our own experience, how the Problem Based Learning method can be used to incorporate telehealth systems in medical science education. We also present a survey of medical students and faculty, conducted at a university in Brazil, to gain the participants' opinions on the nu-case mobile telehealth system. The results of the survey show that nu-case provides support for a range of tasks that a telehealth system needs to cater for in the context of our application area.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Jan 2013
  • C. Deaker · M. Masoodian · B. Rogers
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    ABSTRACT: Massively multiplayer online role-playing games typically feature rich and complex game environments to provide more engaging game-play experiences. The complexity of the underlying system in such games can however result in increased complexity of their interfaces, which may diminish player enjoyment - a major element of players' game experience. Players may customise their in-game interfaces to deal with this type of complexity and hence improve their performance, but the challenges associated with manual interface customisation may prevent some players from effectively personalising their own game interface. In this paper we present an adaptive feedback system with a visual interface component, which dynamically provides the player with a list of predicted actions they are likely to take, in order to simplify the game interface and improve players' game experience. We also report on the outcomes of a user evaluation of this system which demonstrate the potential value of adaptive user interfaces in game design.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2013
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    ABSTRACT: Although there are already a range of energy monitoring and automation systems available in the market that target residential homes, mostly with the aim of reducing their total energy consumption, very few of these systems are directly concerned with how those energy savings are actually made. As such, these systems do not provide tools that would allow users to make intelligent decisions about their energy usage strategies, and encourage them to change their energy use behaviour. In this paper we describe a system designed to facilitate planning and control of energy usage activities in residential homes. We also report on a user study of this system which demonstrates its potential for making energy savings possible.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2013
  • Chris Deaker · Masood Masoodian · Bill Rogers
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    ABSTRACT: Massively multiplayer online role-playing games, such as World of Warcraft, have become very popular in recent years. These types of games often provide the player with a wide range of game abilities, weapons, tools, options, stats, etc. which grow in number as the player progresses through the game. This in turn makes the user interface of the game more complex and difficult to interact with. Games such as World of Warcraft attempt to combat this by providing mechanisms (e.g. add-ons) for interface customization by the player. However, it is unclear which aspects of the game interface players prefer to customize, or what effects those customizations have on their gameplay experience. In this paper we present a survey of World of Warcraft players to identify their opinions on game interface customization preferences. The results of this survey are likely to apply to other massively multiplayer online role-playing games.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Nov 2012
  • Kohl Bromwich · Masood Masoodian · Bill Rogers
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    ABSTRACT: Teaching elementary programming is a difficult and often frustrating process. Many students fail to grasp the basic concepts and drop out of their programmes of study. Although visual languages with some form of game element have been explored as a solution to this problem, evidence on the success of these is at best mixed, without much empirical evaluation to support various claims that are made by their developers. In this paper we argue for and present a more limited programming game system for teaching basic programming constructs to beginner programmers at junior high school level. We also present an evaluation of this game which shows that students participating in this study enjoyed playing the game and succeeded in advancing through progressively more challenging stages of the game, which rely on understanding the underlying programming constructs.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Jul 2012