M Kekki

University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Uusimaa, Finland

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Publications (127)374.19 Total impact

  • M. Siurala · M. Isokoski · K. Varis · M. Kekki
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    ABSTRACT: The state of the gastric body mucosa was examined bioptically in randomly selected 16-65-year-old subjects of a Finnish rural community, Pornainen. The series were representative of the whole population as regards sex, age, and occupational distribution. Gastritis was found in 53 per cent of the series, with no difference between the sexes, being superficial in 25 per cent and atrophic in 28 per cent. The prevalence rate of gastritis increased significantly with age, 1.40±0.10 (SD) yearly per cent of the total group of corresponding age. This increase was mainly due to the increase of atrophic gastritis, whereas the prevalence of superficial gastritis remained nearly constant. The results suggest a poor healing tendency of gastritis in general and of atrophic gastritis in particular. The yearly increase in the prevalence rate of atrophic gastritis at all ages examined, was computed to 1.25±0.19 (SD) per cent of the total group of corresponding age. The age-specific prevalence rates of gastritis have not an exponential distributon, which suggests that there may be some inherent age factors which predispose to the high preivalencerate of gastritis in elder people. The time necessary for the transition of superficial gastritis into atrophic gastritis was computed to about 19 years. The corresponding time obtained from the previous follow-up examinations of the authors was about 17 years.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2010
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    ABSTRACT: The distribution and turn-over kinetics of ceruloplasmin were studied by means of 131I-labelled human ceruloplasmin in 7 patients suffering from active rheumatoid arthritis and in 13 control subjects. Total mass and absolute intravascular mass showed a tendency towards higher values in the patients, though some overlapping was seen. No difference was seen in the distribution of ceruloplasmin in the intravascular and extravascular compartments in the patients and the control subjects. The fractional catabolic rate (per cent of intravascular pool per day) was on an average on the same level in the patients and the controls. The daily turnover was significantly accelerated in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2009
  • Esko A. Nikkilä · Matti Kekki
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    ABSTRACT: . Plasma triglyceride turnover has been measured in 34 adult healthy human volunteers selected on the basis of normal serum cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations and a normal b.wt. The circulating triglyceride was labelled in vivo with tritiated glycerol and the disappearance of radioactivity was followed up to 24 h. The descending part of the slope was divided into exponential components with the aid of a computer and the one-exponential resolutions were used for analysis. The enzymatic nature of the triglyceride removal mechanism was confirmed. When it was assumed that all subjects have a common maximal removal velocity (Vmax) level, calculation of Km values indicated that the population under study is definitely composed at least of two and perhaps of three groups. The next analysis was therefore carried out without any presumptions and the conventional enzyme kinetic plots were drawn. These revealed that the two groups differ in regard to Vmax but not to Km. Two of the subjects did not fit into either of these groups. Group I with a higher Vmax had a significantly higher turnover rate than group II, which showed a rather uniform distribution of both turnover rate and concentration. The two groups had identical age, sex and b.wt. distribution. There was a definite difference in the triglyceride kinetics between males and females. Both had identical turnover rates, but females showed a lower Km and, correspondingly, a lower plasma concentration of triglyceride. The well known difference in plasma triglyceride concentration between men and fertile-aged women is thus accounted for by the more efficient removal system in the latter. It is concluded that the plasma triglyceride concentration in any individual and under any conditions is determined by three factors: (1) the turnover (synthesis) rate, (2) the maximal removal velocity (Vmax), and (3) the Michaelis constant (Km) of the removal enzyme(s). All of these may be influenced by factors like diet, hormones, metabolites and drugs, but obviously the first two are also genetically determined. It is suggested that any classification of hypertriglyceridemias should include an enzyme kinetic analysis, and this will be attempted in the studies in progress.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2009 · Acta medica Scandinavica
  • J Valle · M Kekki · P Sipponen · T Ihamäki · M Siurala
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    ABSTRACT: The long-term course of Helicobacter pylori gastritis is not well known because there are few follow-up studies available, and the follow-up time has been short. The progression of H. pylori infection and chronic gastritis was retrospectively examined in 102 patients followed up for 32 years. In all patients a blind suction biopsy from the corpus mucosa was taken in 1952, and an endoscopic re-examination with biopsy specimens from the antrum and corpus was performed in 1983. In the first examination 85 patients (83%) were H. pylori-positive as assessed from Giemsa-stained corpus mucosa specimens as compared with 70 H. pylori-positive patients (69%) at the end of the follow-up (1983). Two of the 17 patients who were initially H. pylori-negative became positive in 1983, implying an infection rate of 0.4% per patient-year. On the other hand, 17 of the 85 patients who were initially H. pylori-positive became negative in 1983, representing a disappearance rate of 0.6%. However, the stomach became completely normal in only eight cases, which represents a healing rate of 0.3% per patient-year. All patients with duodenal ulcer disease were H. pylori-positive at the first examination and remained so during the follow-up. In these patients chronic gastritis affected predominantly the antral mucosa, and corpus atrophy did not develop. Parietal cell antibodies appeared during the follow-up in six cases, and five of them were H. pylori-positive at the first examination. In most of these cases gastritis progressed into severe grades of corpus atrophy accompanied by the disappearance of H. pylori infection and normalization of the antral mucosa. New H. pylori infection and complete healing of infected mucosa may occur in adult life, but this is rare. Duodenal ulcer disease is associated with persistent H. pylori infection and absence of corpus atrophy. The appearance of parietal cell antibodies leads to progression of corpus atrophy and disappearance of H. pylori.
    No preview · Article · Jul 1996 · Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
  • P Sipponen · M Kekki · K Seppälä · M Siurala
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    ABSTRACT: Helicobacter pylori is the main cause of chronic gastritis in humans. Autoimmune mechanisms and Helicobacter heilmannii infection are other causes, both of which are of minor significance in a worldwide perspective. Atrophic gastritis is a quite common late consequence of H. pylori gastritis and will develop on a multifactorial basis, but not in all infected persons. The evolution of atrophic gastritis is a slow and gradually worsening process leading to subtypes, in which the antrum and corpus are affected to dissimilar extent and degree. The distal part of the stomach is the site where the atrophic sequelae (atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia) of H. pylori infection occur most often. A minority of cases develop corpus-limited, or corpus-predominant atrophic gastritis. Along with the worsening of atrophic gastritis, inflammation and density of colonization of the mucosa by H. pylori tend to decrease in grade. In general, the degree of gastric mucosal inflammation, acute and chronic, is positively related to the degree of colonization of the mucosa by H. pylori. Acid secretion and local acidity are factors which modulate the ecology and density of colonization of H. pylori in the stomach, and may thus also modulate the evolution of chronic gastritis into topographically dissimilar subtypes. Acid secretion varies among individuals, this variation being perhaps caused by hereditary differences in parietal cell mass, or by differences in the sensitivity of parietal cells to hormonal or neural stimuli. It is hypothesized that in genuine hypersecretors, H. pylori colonization and subsequent gastritis with atrophic and metaplastic sequelae may be limited to the antrum, while in hyposecretors gastritis predominates in the corpus. In the latter, atrophic gastritis in the corpus then leads to further impairment of acid output. In these cases, H. pylori infection and gastritis may, finally, heal in the antrum, resulting in hypochlorhydria and atrophic gastritis that is limited to, or predominant in the corpus.
    No preview · Article · May 1996 · Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The long-term course of Helicobacter pylori gastritis is not well known because there are few follow-up studies available, and the follow-up time has been short. Methods: The progression of H. pylori infection and chronic gastritis was retrospectively examined in 102 patients followed up for 32 years. In all patients a blind suction biopsy from the corpus mucosa was taken in 1952, and an endoscopic re-examination with biopsy specimens from the antrum and corpus was performed in 1983. Results: In the first examination 85 patients (83%) were H. pylori-positive as assessed from Giemsa-stained corpus mucosa specimens as compared with 70 H. pylori-positive patients (69%) at the end of the follow-up (1983). Two of the 17 patients who were initially H. pylori-negative became positive in 1983, implying an infection rate of 0.4% per patient-year. On the other hand, 17 of the 85 patients who were initially H. pylori-positive became negative in 1983, representing a disappearance rate of 0.6%. However, the stomach became completely normal in only eight cases, which represents a healing rate of 0.3% per patient-year. All patients with duodenal ulcer disease were H. pylori-positive at the first examination and remained so during the follow-up. In these patients chronic gastritis affected predominantly the antral mucosa, and corpus atrophy did not develop. Parietal cell antibodies appeared during the follow-up in six cases, and five of them were H. pylori-positive at the first examination. In most of these cases gastritis progressed into severe grades of corpus atrophy accompanied by the disappearance of H. pylori infection and normalization of the antral mucosa. Conclusions: New H. pylori infection and complete healing of infected mucosa may occur in adult life, but this is rare. Duodenal ulcer disease is associated with persistent H. pylori infection and absence of corpus atrophy. The appearance of parietal cell antibodies leads to progression of corpus atrophy and disappearance of H. pylori.
    No preview · Article · Jan 1996 · Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
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    ABSTRACT: The study is a 12-year endoscopic follow-up investigation on the course of chronic gastritis and Helicobacter pylori infection in a sample of 81 Estonian people. The series is a subset from a random sample of 227 subjects in whom a gastroduodenal endoscopy had been done. The grade of superficial gastritis (SG), atrophy, and colonization of the mucosa by H. pylori was evaluated in biopsy specimens from both antrum and corpus in accordance with the principles of the Sydney System. The healing rate of the H. pylori and gastritis was 0.3% (3 of 81); H. pylori colonization with gastritis developed in 5 of 81 during the follow-up. The mean prevalence of atrophic gastritis (AG) was three times more common in the corpus than in the antrum on the average. The formation of new cases of AG and the disappearance of AG were quite equal during the follow-up, and the overall changes in the grade of SG and atrophy were slow. The mean life span of corpus AG was nearly three times as long as that of antrum AG. In the antrum the grade of chronic inflammation correlated positively with the grade of H. pylori colonization. In cases of SG a low grade of colonization of H. pylori in the antral mucosa in connection with moderate inflammation predicted a reduction or even a healing of gastritis in the long term. New H. pylori infections with subsequent gastritis may occur in adulthood; a healing of gastritis occurs but is a quite rare event in the course of the 12-year follow-up. Further, in the present random sample of Estonian people atrophic corpus gastritis did not show an overall progression, in contrast to our earlier findings.
    No preview · Article · Nov 1995 · Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
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    ABSTRACT: We describe here our observations on colonization of the gastric mucosa by Helicobacter pylori in a long-term follow-up of 25 patients with gastric ulcer (GU). All patients were followed-up endoscopically for more than 10 years (mean, 16 years) and endoscopically verified to have GU in the angular or corpus area of the stomach. None had received treatment with H2 blockers or omeprazole or had undergone any maintenance therapy or surgery. On the basis of the endoscopic findings on the activity of GU at follow-up endoscopies, the patients were divided into a group of subjects with 'low risk' of recurrence (15 patients who either had no (7 patients) or only a single recurrence (8 patients) at the first follow-up endoscopy but not thereafter) and into those with a 'high risk' of recurrence (10 patients who had at least 2 episodes of recurrence at follow-up endoscopies). A severe bilateral (antrum and corpus) colonization of the gastric mucosa by H. pylori at the first re-examination (1-6 years after the initial diagnosis of GU) was the most important characteristic feature in the patients with high risk of recurrence as compared with those with low risk. In the course of the follow-up, colonization of the corpus mucosa by H. pylori remained rather unchanged in both high- and low-risk subjects but decreased in grade in antrum particularly in those with low risk (no bacteria at the last endoscopy in 13 of 16 low-risk patients and in 2 of 8 high-risk patients). In both low- and high-risk groups corpus gastritis developed progressively into atrophic gastritis (11 of 25 patients had severe corpus atrophy at the last endoscopy). On the other hand, antral gastritis showed a tendency to heal (13 of 24 patients had normal or only slightly gastric antrum at the last endoscopy). The observations indicate that the H. pylori plays a role in and associates closely with the long-term course of angular or corpus GU disease and is related to the tendency of these ulcers to recur.
    No preview · Article · Jul 1994 · Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology
  • Article: Pathology

    No preview · Article · Oct 1992 · Irish Journal of Medical Science
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    ABSTRACT: Helicobacter pylori is rarely found in gastric biopsy specimens from individuals with atrophic gastritis of the body mucosa. To determine if subjects with atrophic body gastritis have evidence of previous infection with H. pylori, immunoglobulin G antibody to H. pylori was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in sera of 399 Finnish subjects. In 124 subjects, multiple biopsy specimens from body and antrum had been evaluated for the presence of H. pylori by Giemsa staining. Antibody correlated well with H. pylori staining except in the subgroup with atrophic body gastritis, in whom the prevalence of seropositivity (86%) was significantly greater than the prevalence of positive staining (33%) (P less than 0.001). Twenty-five subjects had positive antibody and negative staining. This group had a significantly higher prevalence of atrophic body gastritis (80%), lower maximal acid output, lower serum pepsinogen I levels, and higher serum gastrin concentrations than did seropositive subjects with H. pylori. These data suggest that most patients with atrophic body gastritis, despite having a low incidence of current overt infection, have been infected with H. pylori at some point in their lives.
    No preview · Article · Aug 1991 · Gastroenterology
  • Pentti Sipponen · Matti Kekki · Max Siurala
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    ABSTRACT: Chronic gastritis is a common disease which forms an important background to the pathogenesis of several gastric diseases. In most instances, gastritis seems to be a bacterial (microbial) disease. It begins as long-lasting, chronic inflammatory reaction directed against Helicobacter pylori (HP), or occasionally against other spiral bacteria, which colonize in the space between the surface epithelium and the mucous layer. Gastritis may, irrespectively of the HP-related or HP-independent origin, progress to an atrophy (chronic gastritis with atrophy) in the underlying mucosa. Prevalence of gastritis increases with increase in age, but great variations exist in the age-specific prevalence and in mean age of onset of the gastritis in different populations. A high rate and an early onset of the HP-related gastritis associates with low socio-economic status. Chronic gastritis, and the gastritis with atrophy in particular, may interfere with the function of the affected gastric mucosa, and may subsequently increase or decrease the risk of some gastric diseases, such as cancer and peptic ulcer. Both antral and corpus gastritis with coexistent severe atrophic changes have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer. In addition, gastritis seems to also play an important role in the pathogenesis of peptic ulcer. Virtually all patients with DU and GU have coexisting and preceding gastritis. The cumulative risk of ulcer has been estimated to be high in subjects with gastritis, but, in contrast, to be low in subjects who have normal gastric mucosa.
    No preview · Article · Jun 1991 · Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
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    ABSTRACT: The prevalence and density of Helicobacter pylori (HP) colonisation was assessed twice, with an interval of six years from antral and corpus biopsies from a randomly collected Estonian urban population sample. Positive HP colonisation was found in either at 1st or 2nd or in both examinations in 85 out of 86 subjects in whom gastritis without atrophy (chronic inflammation without atrophic changes, SG) either developed or remained during the follow-up at the SG level. There was a clear intraindividual tendency to keep the grade of HP colonisation at an unchanged level during the follow-up: the hypothesis of random variation of HP colonisation during follow-up could be statistically rejected. Close to half of the subjects had at both examinations an identical grade of HP colonisation in the antral or corpus mucosa. Distinct changes in HP colonisation were observed in three instances: (1) the appearance of HP colonisation occurred concomitantly with appearance of gastritis; (2) the development of antrum atrophic gastritis (AG) occurred with concomitant diminution and eventual disappearance of HP in the antral side, and (3) normalization of antral mucosa occurred with persistence of corpus AG with concomitant disappearance of HP colonisation at both sites of the stomach mucosa. The grade of HP colonisation increased with increase in severity of SG and decreased with the progression of AG changes. In the antrum at the SG level a distinct increase was seen both in the grade of HP colonisation and in the severity of SG up to middle age, but in the corpus mucosa only HP colonisation but no SG progression was seen in the younger age-groups.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
    No preview · Article · Feb 1991 · Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology. Supplement
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    ABSTRACT: Out of 59 duodenal ulcer (DU) probands and their 199 first-degree relatives Giemsa-staining for the determination of Helicobacter pylori (HP) was performed in 51 probands and 155 relatives. Controls were matched by age and sex from a family sample representing the same geographical area. In all, 155 controls were found for the probands and relatives. The occurrence and score of HP density showed an excellent correlation with morphology of the mucosa, signs of acute inflammation and presence of gastric metaplasia in the duodenal bulb. The prevalence of HP was 94% in DU probands and significantly higher than in their relatives and controls. In sibs of DU probands the prevalence of HP (64%) was also significantly higher than in controls (51%) obviously due to the presence of a subgroup of sibs with signs of active or past duodenal ulcer disease, which show higher than expected prevalence of HP, and of acid hypersecretion and high levels of serum pepsinogen I (PG I). Peak acid output (PAO), serum pepsinogen I and II and fasting serum gastrin levels were in relatives without atrophy higher in HP positive than negative cases but significant differences were present only with regard to the pepsinogens. The occurrence of HP positivity as well as of high PAO and pepsinogen levels might be considered risk factors of DU disease in close relatives of DU probands. On the other hand, the significance of HP positivity as cause of abdominal complaints is doubtful, in view of the complete lack of correlation between HP and morphology and complaints in the present study.
    No preview · Article · Feb 1991 · Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology. Supplement
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    ABSTRACT: The mean pepsinogen I (PG I) level in a Finnish family sample was different in males and females and the difference was statistically significant. After exclusion of subjects with gastritis there remained 67 females and 68 males with morphologically completely normal antral and corpus mucosa. In females there was a significant increase of PG I with advancing age, the regression coefficient being 0.37 and statistically significant (p less than 0.01). In males no such increase was found, and individual cases revealed an almost random distribution with age. A similar increase with age has been noted in gastric acid output in females but not in males. Assuming that there is a linear relationship between PG I levels and the total chief cell mass, the PG I level would be determined by three main variables: thickness of the glandular layer, density of chief cells, and area occupied by chief cells. Of these variables the thickness and chief cell density showed neither in females nor in males any statistically significant increase with age, leaving the area as the variable which would account for the increase of PG I.
    No preview · Article · Feb 1991 · Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology. Supplement
  • M Kekki · I M Samloff · K Varis · T Ihamäki
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    ABSTRACT: The possibilities to screen atrophic corpus gastritis with serum pepsinogen I (S-PGI) and serum gastrin (S-gastrin) concentrations have been studied in 774 subjects: 71 index subjects selected from a general population at random, 353 of their first-degree relatives, 276 first-degree relatives of patients with gastric cancer, 53 patients with pernicious anaemia, and 21 of their relatives. Discrimination function analysis was calculated from members of random and gastric carcinoma families. S-PGI less than 30 ng/ml had a high sensitivity for severe diffuse atrophic corpus gastritis (SDAG) alone (89.5%) and SDAG + severe patchy atrophic corpus gastritis (SPAG) (89.1%). Respective figures for specificity were 91.5% and 94.8%. The discriminatory power of S-PGI less than 30 ng/ml and S-PGI less than 25 ng/ml was of the same order. The sensitivity of low S-PGI decreased sharply in detection of slighter forms of atrophic corpus gastritis. The sensitivity of S-gastrin greater than 100 pmol/l to discriminate SDAG was 57.9% and SDAG+SPAG 58.7%. Respective figures for specificity were 90.2% and 92.2%. Diffuse and patchy atrophic changes behaved similarly regarding S-PGI and S-gastrin mean concentrations. Accordingly, the biopsy specimen with the severest atrophic changes indicates the degree of atrophy, which associates closely with the changes in S-PGI and S-gastrin. In conclusion, severe atrophic (diffuse or patchy) corpus gastritis may be screened from a general population with high sensitivity and specificity by low S-PGI less than 30 ng/ml, whereas an increased level of S-gastrin is too insensitive for this.
    No preview · Article · Feb 1991 · Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology. Supplement
  • M Kekki · M Siurala · T Ihamäki
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    ABSTRACT: The occurrence of different combinations of antral and corpus atrophic gastritis (AG) was studied in 127 sibs and 159 children of 73 gastric carcinoma patients. Seventy-three control probands, age- and sex-matched for the carcinoma probands, and their 379 first-degree relatives were used as controls. Sibs of gastric carcinoma patients revealed a significant enrichment of AG affecting simultaneously both antrum and corpus (combined AG), while no such enrichment could be demonstrated in children, who behaved on the whole similarly to the controls. In addition, sibs of gastric carcinoma patients showed a significant aggregation of combined AG also when compared with children of similar age. This suggests that genetic factors in addition to environmental ones participate in the accumulation of combined AG in sibs. The lack of phenotype AB in children excludes the possibility of dominant Mendelian inheritance, but leaves the possibility of a recessive autosomal or multigenetic inheritance. The enrichment of combined AG in sibs of gastric carcinoma patients could be one of the factors involved in the increased liability of close relatives of gastric carcinoma patients to contract gastric malignancy.
    No preview · Article · Feb 1991 · Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology. Supplement
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    ABSTRACT: A series of 38 patients with high gastric ulcer (GU) was examined twice a seven-year interval. One-third of the patients had an active ulcer at the second examination. Chronic gastritis was evaluated, and the level of Helicobacter pylori (HP) colonisation assessed semiquantitatively. The results were compared with age and sex matched non-ulcer controls. The GU series differed from the controls in having a higher degree of HP colonisation in gastric mucosa. The relative risks (RR) in predicting high GU connected with high HP colonisation were significantly elevated, both in the antrum (RR = 6.0-4.8) and in the corpus (RR 5.0-4.4), and still higher when combined HP colonisation values were used (RR 9.5-7.1). The persistence of active ulcer (GU+) was associated with a very high level of HP colonisation, with absence of corpus atrophic gastritis at the first examination and with young patients. Half of the GU+ patients had the maximum grade of combined HP colonisation in both examinations. The study indicates that the presence of HP infection as well as the level of HP colonisation are of importance in both the development and chronicity of peptic GU disease.
    No preview · Article · Feb 1991 · Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology. Supplement
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    ABSTRACT: The behaviour of acid secretion, serum pepsinogen I and II (PG I and PG II) and morphology of the gastric mucosa were analyzed in 59 duodenal ulcer probands (DU probands), their 199 first-degree relatives and 228 control subjects. DU probands had as a rule antral gastritis with normal or slightly altered corpus mucosa, and higher mean peak acid output (PAO), PG I and II levels than their relatives and controls. Sibs of DU probands differed from their controls mainly with regard to morphology which showed features characteristic of DU probands, i.e. antral gastritis with normal or slightly altered corpus mucosa. Moreover, high PAO levels were found highly significantly more often in sibs of DU probands (13%) than in controls (6%). Likewise, the prevalence of endoscopic signs of active or past duodenal ulcer were present in sibs highly significantly more often than in controls and they accumulated in the subgroup of sibs with high PAO or PG I levels. It seems probable that the occurrence of high PAO and PG I levels in sibs of DU probands can be considered as signs of increased liability to duodenal ulcer. PAO and PG I were as expected significantly higher in male than in female probands, relatives and controls. Exclusion of cases of corpus gastritis decreased the levels but the sex difference persisted. PAO, PG I and II revealed a significant increase of the levels in middle age followed in older age in case of PAO and PG I by a significant decrease. The decrease was abolished when the cases of corpus gastritis were excluded suggesting an effect of gastritis. However, the earlier increase of the levels remained virtually unaffected although there was a uniform decrease of the mean values. This suggests the participation of factors unrelated to gastritis. The nature of the factors remains unknown, but literature data and data derived from our recent study suggest involvement of anatomical factors such as an increase in the size of acid and PG I secreting area.
    No preview · Article · Feb 1991 · Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology. Supplement
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    ABSTRACT: To study the prevalence and course of chronic gastritis (CG), 142 adult subjects collected at random from an Estonian urban area were endoscopically and bioptically examined at a six-year interval. The histology of the antral and corpus mucosae was evaluated by grading gastritis without ("superficial gastritis"; SG) and with atrophy ("atrophic gastritis"; AG) into mild, moderate and severe categories. A total of 135 (95%) and 139 (98%) subjects showed CG in the 1st and 2nd examinations, respectively. The CG healed in one subjects (0.7%), and in 5 out of 7 subjects with normal stomach in the 1st examination the CG started during the follow-up. No change in the severity of CG was seen in 24% of subjects with gastritis in the 1st examination. The main trend of CG was a slow, "one-step progression" in severity of inflammation and appearance of atrophy and intestinal metaplasia. Inflammation progressed significantly, especially in the young age groups and in the antrum in particular. The prevalence of AG increased linearly with age in corpus (mean annual risk 1.25%). Parietal cell antibodies (PCA) were found in 2 subjects in the 1st examination, and a further 2 subjects developed these antibodies later. Three of four PCA-positive subjects belonged to a subgroup of 8 elderly subjects who had corpus AG at both examinations and who also showed normal or normalizing mucosa in the antrum. It is concluded that CG is a slowly progressive disease advancing with time and, once started, rarely healing spontaneously.
    No preview · Article · Feb 1991 · Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology. Supplement
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    ABSTRACT: Serum pepsinogen I (S-PGI) and serum gastrin (S-gastrin) were examined in the screening of three types of atrophic gastritis with inherent high risk of gastric cancer: in 102 cases with severe atrophic corpus gastritis (SACG), in 5 cases with severe atrophic antrum gastritis (SAAG), and in 15 cases with severe atrophic pangastritis (SAPG) (atrophy both in corpus and in antrum) found among 916 subjects from three family series (265 from gastric cancer families, 425 from randomly selected control families and 226 from pernicious anaemia families). There is no way to screen directly atrophic gastritis restricted to the antral mucosa. In pangastritis atrophy of antral glands causes a failure of the hypergastrinemic reaction of achlorhydria. The combination of S-PGI less than 25 micrograms/l + S-gastrin less than 200 pmol/l detected 80.0% of our cases with SAPG, and only 17 subjects of 794 (2.1%) were false positives i.e. who had not advanced atrophic gastritis. The risk of gastric cancer may be significantly higher in SAPG than in SACG. The estimated prevalence of SAPG was 3% in random-family members over 60 years. The combination of S-PGI and S-gastrin is recommended when the cost/benefit ratio in the screening program of gastric cancer is considered and people from a general population are selected for endoscopic studies.
    No preview · Article · Feb 1991 · Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology. Supplement

Publication Stats

4k Citations
374.19 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1966-1996
    • University of Helsinki
      • • Department of Pathology
      • • Department of Oral Medicine
      • • Department of Pharmacology
      Helsinki, Uusimaa, Finland
  • 1985-1995
    • University of Tartu
      • • Faculty of Medicine
      • • Department of Internal Medicine (ARSK)
      Dorpat, Tartu County, Estonia
  • 1972-1990
    • Helsinki University Central Hospital
      Helsinki, Uusimaa, Finland
    • Central Hospital Central Finland
      Jyväskylä, Province of Western Finland, Finland
  • 1987
    • Oulu University Hospital
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      Uleoborg, Oulu, Finland