John A Belperio

University of California, Los Angeles, Los Ángeles, California, United States

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Publications (201)1172.32 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Objectives The aim is to investigate whether the 12-month quantitative changes in high-resolution CT (HRCT) measures of interstitial lung disease (ILD) are different, and to understand how they change, in patients with scleroderma-related ILD who receive drug therapy versus placebo. Methods HRCT images were acquired at baseline and at 12 months in 83 participants in Scleroderma Lung Study I, a clinical trial comparing treatment with oral cyclophosphamide versus placebo. A computer-aided model was used to quantify the extent of fibrotic reticulation, ground glass and honeycomb patterns and quantitative ILD (QILD: sum of these patterns) in the whole lung and the lung zone (upper, middle or lower) of maximal disease involvement. Results Mean QILD score decreased by 3.9% in the cyclophosphamide group while increasing by 4.2% in the placebo group in the most severe zone (p=0.01) and decreased by 3.2% in the cyclophosphamide group while increasing by 2.2% in the placebo group in the whole lung (p=0.03). Transitional probabilities demonstrated greater changes from a fibrotic to either a ground glass or normal pattern in the cyclophosphamide group and the reverse in the placebo group. Conclusions Changes in quantitative HRCT measures of ILD provide a sensitive indication of disease progression and response to treatment. Trial registration number NCT00004563; Post-results.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Annals of the rheumatic diseases

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by abnormal elaboration of vasoactive peptides, endothelial cell dysfunction, vascular remodeling, and inflammation, which collectively contribute to its pathogenesis. We investigated the potential for high-density lipoprotein (HDL) dysfunction (i.e., proinflammatory effects) and abnormal plasma eicosanoid levels to contribute to the pathobiology of PAH and assessed ex vivo the effect of treatment with apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide 4F on the observed HDL dysfunction. We determined the "inflammatory indices" HII and LII for HDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL), respectively, in subjects with idiopathic PAH (IPAH) and associated PAH (APAH) by an in vitro monocyte chemotaxis assay. The 4F was added ex vivo, and repeat LII and HII values were obtained versus a sham treatment. We further determined eicosanoid levels in plasma and HDL fractions from patients with IPAH and APAH relative to controls. The LIIs were significantly higher for IPAH and APAH patients than for controls. Incubation of plasma with 4F before isolation of LDL and HDL significantly reduced the LII values, compared with sham-treated LDL, for IPAH and APAH. The increased LII values reflected increased states of LDL oxidation and thereby increased proinflammatory effects in both cohorts. The HIIs for both PAH cohorts reflected a "dysfunctional HDL phenotype," that is, proinflammatory HDL effects. In contrast to "normal HDL function," the determined HIIs were significantly increased for the IPAH and APAH cohorts. Ex vivo 4F treatment significantly improved the HDL function versus the sham treatment. Although there was a significant "salutary effect" of 4F treatment, this did not entirely normalize the HII. Significantly increased levels for both IPAH and APAH versus controls were evident for the eicosanoids 9-HODE, 13-HODE, 5-HETE, 12-HETE, and 15-HETE, while no statistical differences were evident for comparisons of IPAH and APAH for the determined plasma eicosanoid levels in the HDL fractions. Our study has further implicated the putative role of "oxidant stress" and inflammation in the pathobiology of PAH. Our data suggest the influences on the "dysfunctional HDL phenotype" of increased oxidized fatty acids, which are paradoxically proinflammatory. We speculate that therapies that target either the "inflammatory milieu" or the "dysfunctional HDL phenotype," such as apoA-I mimetic peptides, may be valuable avenues of further research in pulmonary vascular diseases.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) is a possible risk factor for bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) following lung transplantation; however, the mechanism for any such association is poorly understood. Based on the association of TGF-β with acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, we hypothesized that it might play a role in the continuum between PGD and BOS. Thus, the association between PGD and BOS was assessed in a single-center cohort of lung transplant recipients. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid concentrations of TGF-β and procollagen collected within 24 h of transplantation were compared across the spectrum of PGD, and incorporated into Cox models of BOS. Immunohistochemistry localized expression of TGF-β and its receptor in early lung biopsies posttransplant. We found an association between PGD and BOS in both bilateral and single lung recipients with a hazard ratio of 3.07 (95% CI 1.76–5.38) for the most severe form of PGD. TGF-β and procollagen concentrations were elevated during PGD (p < 0.01), and associated with increased rates of BOS. Expression of TGF-β and its receptor localized to allograft infiltrating mononuclear and stromal cells, and the airway epithelium. These findings validate the association between PGD and the subsequent development of BOS, and suggest that this association may be mediated by receptor/TGF-β biology.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · American Journal of Transplantation
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    ABSTRACT: Rationale The mechanism by which acute allograft rejection leads to chronic rejection remains poorly understood despite its common occurrence. Exosomes, membrane vesicles released from cells within the lung allograft, contain a diverse array of biomolecules that closely reflect the biological state of the cell and tissue from which they are released. Biomarkers originating from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid could provide timely and sensitive detection of AR, reducing the incidence of severe AR and CLAD and improving outcomes. Objectives Provide an in-depth analysis of the BALF esRNA population after lung transplantation and evaluate for differential expression between acute cellular rejection and quiescence. Methods Serial bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were ultracentrifuged to obtain the exosomal pellet for RNA extraction, on which RNA-Seq was performed. Measurements and Main Results Acute rejection demonstrates an intense inflammatory environment, skewed toward both innate and adaptive immune responses. Novel, potential upstream regulators identified offer potential therapeutic targets. Conclusions Our findings validate BALF esRNA as a source for understanding the pathophysiology of allograft rejection and for biomarker discovery in lung transplantation.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Epithelial to mesenchymal cell transition (EMT), whereby fully differentiated epithelial cells transition to a mesenchymal phenotype, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). CXCR3 and its ligands are recognized to play a protective role in pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the presence and extent of EMT and CXCR3 expression in human IPF surgical lung biopsies and assessed whether CXCR3 and its ligand CXCL9 modulate EMT in alveolar epithelial cells. Coexpression of the epithelial marker thyroid transcription factor-1 and the mesenchymal marker α-smooth muscle actin and CXCR3 expression was examined by immunohistochemical staining of IPF surgical lung biopsies. Epithelial and mesenchymal marker expression was examined by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence in human alveolar epithelial (A549) cells treated with TGF-β1 and CXCL9, with Smad2, Smad3, and Smad7 expression and cellular localization examined by Western blotting. We found that significantly more cells were undergoing EMT in fibrotic versus normal areas of lung in IPF surgical lung biopsy samples. CXCR3 was expressed by type II pneumocytes and fibroblasts in fibrotic areas in close proximity to cells undergoing EMT. In vitro, CXCL9 abrogated TGF-β1-induced EMT. A decrease in TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3 occurred with CXCL9 treatment. This was associated with increased shuttling of Smad7 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm where it inhibits Smad phosphorylation. This suggests a role for EMT in the pathogenesis of IPF and provides a novel mechanism for the inhibitory effects of CXCL9 on TGF-β1-induced EMT. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · The Journal of Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Background While pulmonary arterial hypertension complicating ILD (PAH-ILD) is associated with markedly increased mortality, PAH directed therapy has not been adequately studied in this population. We previously demonstrated that PAH directed therapy with intravenous or subcutaneous prostacyclin (PGI2) in patients with PAH-ILD improves right heart haemodynamics (1). However, it remains unclear which patients with PAH-ILD will respond to therapy. Objectives The present study seeks to investigate whether specific chemokines and growth factors, previously found to be associated with vascular remodeling, can be used to predict PAH directed therapy responsiveness. We hypothesized that PAH-ILD patients with augmented levels of specific CC chemokines (CCL2 and CCL5), as well as downstream growth factors (EGF, FGF-2, PDGF-AA and PGF-BB), may exhibit decreased responsiveness to PAH-directed therapy in ILD. Methods In this single-center study, plasma samples (n=15) were collected prospectively prior to initiation of PGI2 therapy. Plasma concentrations of CCL2, CCL5, EGF, FGF-2, PDGF-AA and PDGF-BB were evaluated by fluorochrome (Luminex) technology. Response to PGI2 was assessed as a reduction in PVR from right heart catherization at 12 months. A Kendall's tau (τ) rank correlation coefficient was used to measure the association between baseline concentrations of specific chemokines and growth factors and PGI2 response. Results In our cohort of 15 patients with ILD (8 idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, 3 combined pulmonary fibrosis/emphysema, 2 non-specific interstitial pneumonia, 1 sarcoid, and 1 hypersensitivity pneumonitis) and PAH (baseline mean pulmonary artery pressure of 47.2 mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance of 697.9 dyn s/cm5), higher concentrations of the CC chemokine CCL5 (τ =0.49, p=0.0138), as well as the growth factors PDGF-AA (τ =0.47, p=0.0186) (See Figure 1), and PDGF-BB (τ =0.49, p=0.0138) were negatively correlated with a relative change in PVR in response to PGI2 therapy. Conclusions Elevated baseline concentrations of plasma chemokine CCL5 and growth factors PDGF-AA and PDGF-BB affecting vascular fibroproliferation may be associated with irreversible remodeling of the pulmonary circulation in response to PGI2 therapy in ILD associated PAH. References Disclosure of Interest None declared
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
  • Joseph P Lynch · David M Sayah · John A Belperio · S Sam Weigt
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    ABSTRACT: Survival in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has improved dramatically over the past 30 to 40 years, with mean survival now approximately 40 years. Nonetheless, progressive respiratory insufficiency remains the major cause of mortality in CF patients, and lung transplantation (LT) is eventually required. Timing of listing for LT is critical, because up to 25 to 41% of CF patients have died while awaiting LT. Globally, approximately 16.4% of lung transplants are performed in adults with CF. Survival rates for LT recipients with CF are superior to other indications, yet LT is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality (∼50% at 5-year survival rates). Myriad complications of LT include allograft failure (acute or chronic), opportunistic infections, and complications of chronic immunosuppressive medications (including malignancy). Determining which patients are candidates for LT is difficult, and survival benefit remains uncertain. In this review, we discuss when LT should be considered, criteria for identifying candidates, contraindications to LT, results post-LT, and specific complications that may be associated with LT. Infectious complications that may complicate CF (particularly Burkholderia cepacia spp., opportunistic fungi, and nontuberculous mycobacteria) are discussed. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
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    ABSTRACT: Staphylococcus aureus is the most commonly isolated gram-positive bacterium after lung transplantation (LT) and has been associated with poor posttransplant outcomes, but its effect on bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) and death in the context of the allograft inflammatory environment has not been studied. A three-state Cox semi-Markovian model was used to determine the influence of allograft S. aureus and the ELR+ CXC chemokines on the survival rates and cause-specific hazards for movement from lung transplant (State 1) to BOS (State 2), from transplant (State 1) to death (State 3), and from BOS (State 2) to death (State 3). Acute rejection, pseudomonas pneumonia, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) CXCL5 and its interaction with S. aureus all increased the likelihood of transition from transplant to BOS. Transition to death from transplant was facilitated by pseudomonas infection and single lung transplant. Movement from BOS to death was affected by the interaction between aspergillus, pseudomonas and CXCL5, but not S. aureus. S. aureus isolation had state specific effects after LT and only in concert with elevated BALF CXCL5 concentrations did it augment the risk of BOS. Pseudomonas and elevated BALF concentrations of CXCL5 continued as significant risk factors for BOS and death after BOS in lung transplantation. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · American Journal of Transplantation
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    ABSTRACT: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive disease characterized by fibrosis and abnormal vascularity. IL-13, a profibrotic cytokine that plays a role in IPF, functions through the Jak/STAT pathway after binding to the IL-13 receptor alpha 1 (IL-13Rα1)/IL-4Rα complex. IL-13 also binds to IL-13Rα2, which has been thought to function as a non-signaling decoy receptor, although possible signaling roles of this receptor have been proposed. CXCR3 and its IFN-inducible ligands-CXCL9, CXCL10, and CXCL11-have been implicated in vascular remodelling and fibroblast motility during the development of IPF. In this study, CXCR3 expression was demonstrated in cultured pulmonary fibroblasts from wild-type BALB/c mice, and was found to be necessary for the IL-13 mediated gene and protein upregulation of IL-13Rα2. In fibroblasts from CXCR3-deficient mice, STAT6 activation was prolonged. This study is the first to demonstrate the expression of CXCR3 in fibroblasts and its association with the expression of IL-13Rα2. Taken together, the results from this study point strongly to a requirement for CXCR3 for IL-13 mediated IL-13Rα2 gene expression. Understanding the function of CXCR3 in IL-13 mediated lung injury may lead to novel approaches to combat the development of pulmonary fibrosis, whether by limiting the effects of IL-13 or by manipulation of angiostatic pathways. The elucidation of the complex relationship between both of these anti-fibrotic receptors and manipulation of the CXCR3-mediated regulation of IL-13Rα2 may represent a novel therapeutic modality in cases of acute lung injury or chronic inflammation that may progress to fibrosis.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology
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    ABSTRACT: Rationale: Primary graft dysfunction (PGD) causes early mortality after lung transplantation and may contribute to late graft failure. No effective treatments exist. The pathogenesis of PGD is unclear, though both neutrophils and activated platelets have been implicated. We hypothesized that neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) contribute to lung injury in PGD in a platelet-dependent manner. Objectives: To study NETs in experimental models of PGD and in lung transplant patients. Methods: Two experimental murine PGD models were studied: hilar clamp (HC) and orthotopic lung transplantation after prolonged cold ischemia (OLT-PCI). NETs were assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and ELISA. Platelet activation was inhibited with aspirin, and NETs were disrupted with deoxyribonuclease (DNaseI). NETs were also measured in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and plasma from lung transplant patients with and without PGD. Measurements and Main Results: NETs were increased after either HC or OLT-PCI compared to surgical controls. Activation and intrapulmonary accumulation of platelets were increased in OLT-PCI, and platelet inhibition reduced NETs and lung injury and improved oxygenation. Disruption of NETs by intrabronchial administration of DNaseI also reduced lung injury and improved oxygenation. In BALF from human lung transplant recipients, NETs were more abundant in patients with PGD. Conclusions: NETs accumulate in the lung in both experimental and clinical PGD. In experimental PGD, NET formation is platelet-dependent, and disruption of NETs with DNaseI reduces lung injury. These data are the first description of a pathogenic role for NETs in solid organ transplantation and suggest that NETs are a promising therapeutic target in PGD.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a significant complication of sarcoidosis, occurring in approximately 6 to > 20% of cases, and markedly increases mortality among these patients. The clinician should exercise a high index of suspicion for sarcoidosis-associated PH (SAPH) given the nonspecific symptomatology and the limitations of echocardiography in this patient population. The pathophysiology of PH in sarcoidosis is complex and multifactorial. Importantly, there are inherent differences in the pathogenesis of SAPH compared with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, making the optimal management of SAPH controversial. In this article, we review the epidemiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment considerations for SAPH. Lung transplantation (LT) is a viable therapeutic option for sarcoid patients with severe pulmonary fibrocystic sarcoidosis or SAPH refractory to medical therapy. We discuss the role for LT in patients with sarcoidosis, review the global experience with LT in this population, and discuss indications and contraindications to LT.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · Seminars in Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nintedanib (formerly known as BIBF 1120) is an intracellular inhibitor that targets multiple tyrosine kinases. A phase 2 trial suggested that treatment with 150 mg of nintedanib twice daily reduced lung-function decline and acute exacerbations in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. METHODS: We conducted two replicate 52-week, randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trials (INPULSIS-1 and INPULSIS-2) to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 150 mg of nintedanib twice daily as compared with placebo in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The primary end point was the annual rate of decline in forced vital capacity (FVC). Key secondary end points were the time to the first acute exacerbation and the change from baseline in the total score on the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire, both assessed over a 52-week period. RESULTS: A total of 1066 patients were randomly assigned in a 3:2 ratio to receive nintedanib or placebo. The adjusted annual rate of change in FVC was -114.7 ml with nintedanib versus -239.9 ml with placebo (difference, 125.3 ml; 95% confidence interval [CI], 77.7 to 172.8; P<0.001) in INPULSIS-1 and -113.6 ml with nintedanib versus -207.3 ml with placebo (difference, 93.7 ml; 95% CI, 44.8 to 142.7; P<0.001) in INPULSIS-2. In INPULSIS-1, there was no significant difference between the nintedanib and placebo groups in the time to the first acute exacerbation (hazard ratio with nintedanib, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.54 to 2.42; P=0.67); in INPULSIS-2, there was a significant benefit with nintedanib versus placebo (hazard ratio, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.19 to 0.77; P=0.005). The most frequent adverse event in the nintedanib groups was diarrhea, with rates of 61.5% and 18.6% in the nintedanib and placebo groups, respectively, in INPULSIS-1 and 63.2% and 18.3% in the two groups, respectively, in INPULSIS-2. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, nintedanib reduced the decline in FVC, which is consistent with a slowing of disease progression; nintedanib was frequently associated with diarrhea, which led to discontinuation of the study medication in less than 5% of patients.
    Full-text · Article · May 2014 · New England Journal of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nintedanib (formerly known as BIBF 1120) is an intracellular inhibitor that targets multiple tyrosine kinases. A phase 2 trial suggested that treatment with 150 mg of nintedanib twice daily reduced lung-function decline and acute exacerbations in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. METHODS: We conducted two replicate 52-week, randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trials (INPULSIS-1 and INPULSIS-2) to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 150 mg of nintedanib twice daily as compared with placebo in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The primary end point was the annual rate of decline in forced vital capacity (FVC). Key secondary end points were the time to the first acute exacerbation and the change from baseline in the total score on the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire, both assessed over a 52-week period. RESULTS: A total of 1066 patients were randomly assigned in a 3:2 ratio to receive nintedanib or placebo. The adjusted annual rate of change in FVC was -114.7 ml with nintedanib versus -239.9 ml with placebo (difference, 125.3 ml; 95% confidence interval [CI], 77.7 to 172.8; P<0.001) in INPULSIS-1 and -113.6 ml with nintedanib versus -207.3 ml with placebo (difference, 93.7 ml; 95% CI, 44.8 to 142.7; P<0.001) in INPULSIS-2. In INPULSIS-1, there was no significant difference between the nintedanib and placebo groups in the time to the first acute exacerbation (hazard ratio with nintedanib, 1.15; 95% CI, 0.54 to 2.42; P=0.67); in INPULSIS-2, there was a significant benefit with nintedanib versus placebo (hazard ratio, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.19 to 0.77; P=0.005). The most frequent adverse event in the nintedanib groups was diarrhea, with rates of 61.5% and 18.6% in the nintedanib and placebo groups, respectively, in INPULSIS-1 and 63.2% and 18.3% in the two groups, respectively, in INPULSIS-2. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, nintedanib reduced the decline in FVC, which is consistent with a slowing of disease progression; nintedanib was frequently associated with diarrhea, which led to discontinuation of the study medication in less than 5% of patients.
    Full-text · Article · May 2014 · New England Journal of Medicine

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2014 · The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2014 · The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2014 · The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation
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    ABSTRACT: Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is characterized by impaired oxygenation due to pulmonary vascular dilatation in patients with end-stage liver disease. At our center, we identified 29 patients who were listed for liver transplantation (LT) with a model for end-stage liver disease exception for HPS between 2001 and 2012. Five of these patients were found to have concurrent interstitial lung disease (ILD). The chest high-resolution computed-tomography demonstrated ground-glass opacities and subpleural reticulation, most consistent with nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP). All four of our patients who underwent LT experienced prolonged hypoxemia postoperatively, with one surgery-related death. However, the three surviving patients had eventual resolution of their hypoxemia with no evidence of ILD progression. In conclusion, we report a high prevalence of ILD, most consistent with NSIP, among patients with HPS. Although there may be increased perioperative risks, the finding of ILD in patients with HPS should not be considered an absolute contraindication to LT.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2014 · Beiträge zur Klinik der Tuberkulose
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    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary hypertension (PH)-targeted therapy in the setting of pulmonary fibrosis (PF) is controversial; the main clinical concern is worsening of systemic hypoxaemia. We sought to determine the effects of gentle initiation and chronic administration of parenteral treprostinil on right heart function in patients with PF associated with an advanced PH phenotype. Open-label, prospective analysis of patients with PF-PH referred for lung transplantation (LT). Advanced PH was defined as mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) ≥35 mm Hg. We compared haemodynamics, Doppler echocardiography (DE), oxygenation, dyspnoea and quality of life indices, and 6 min walk distance (6MWD) before and 12 weeks after parenteral treprostinil. 15 patients were recruited in the study. After therapy, there were significant improvements in right heart haemodynamics (right atrial pressure (9.5 ± 3.4 vs 6.0 ± 3.7); mPAP (47 ± 8 vs 38.9 ± 13.4); CI (2.3 ± 0.5 vs 2.7 ± 0.6); pulmonary vascular resistance (698 ± 278 vs 496 ± 229); transpulmonary gradient (34.7 ± 8.7 vs 28.5 ± 10.3); mvO2 (65 ± 7.2 vs 70.9 ± 7.4); and stroke volume index (29.2 ± 6.7 vs 33 ± 7.3)) and DE parameters reflecting right heart function (right ventricular (RV) end diastolic area (36.4 ± 5.2 vs 30.9 ± 8.2 cm(2)), left ventricular eccentricity index (1.7 ± 0.6 vs 1.3 ± 0.5), tricuspid annular planar systolic excursion (1.6 ± 0.5 vs 1.9 ± 0.2 cm)). These changes occurred without significant alteration in systemic oxygenation, heart rate, or mean systemic arterial pressure. In addition, improvements were seen in 6MWD (171 ± 93 vs 230 ± 114), 36-Item Short Form Health Survey Mental Component Summary aggregate (38 ± 11 vs 44.2 ± 10.7), University of California, San Diego Shortness of Breath Questionnaire (87 ± 17.1 vs 73.1 ± 21), and brain natriuretic peptide (558 ± 859 vs 228 ± 340). PH-targeted therapy may improve right heart haemodynamics and echocardiographic function without affecting systemic oxygen saturation in an advanced PH phenotype associated with RV dysfunction in the setting of PF.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2014 · Thorax

Publication Stats

8k Citations
1,172.32 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001-2015
    • University of California, Los Angeles
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care
      Los Ángeles, California, United States
  • 2013
    • Harbor-UCLA Medical Center
      Torrance, California, United States
  • 2000-2012
    • Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center
      • Department of Medicine
      Torrance, California, United States
  • 2011
    • California State University
      • Department of Medicine
      Long Beach, California, United States
  • 2008
    • Columbia University
      • Department of Medicine
      New York, New York, United States
  • 2001-2006
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • Department of Medicine
      San Francisco, California, United States
  • 2005
    • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
      • Department of Medicine
      North Carolina, United States
  • 2002
    • Yale University
      • Section of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine
      New Haven, Connecticut, United States
    • Henry Ford Hospital
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      Detroit, MI, United States
  • 1999
    • Concordia University–Ann Arbor
      Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States