Hideaki Takanobu

Kogakuin University, Edo, Tōkyō, Japan

Are you Hideaki Takanobu?

Claim your profile

Publications (99)15.93 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes a contact-type air flow sensor inspired by crickets' sensillar seta. The sensor consists of a metal cantilever and an insulation layer. Air flow bends a hair connected to the cantilever, which causes the deflection of the cantilever and the contact with the substrate. Wind tunnel tests showed that the airflow sensors were able to detect wind velocity ranging from 0.1m/s to 1m/s depending on the length of the cantilever. A hexapod miniature robot with two airflow sensors of different lengths were fabricated using MEMS techniques. A thin brass plate was patterned and etched according to the developed shape of the robot, and the sensors were integrated on the brass plate. The plate was then folded to assemble the 3D robot body. The robot successfully walked in two different ways depending on the wind velocity.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2013
  • Kensaku Kudo · Kenji Suzuki · Hideaki Takanobu · Hirofumi Miura
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes a flapping-wing robot operated at a low resonant frequency. We proposed a light wing with a thin plate that can be resonated by a small battery integrated in the robot at a frequency of 11 Hz. Flapping angles and thrust forces of the resonant wings were measured and compared with those of the non-resonant wings. Experimental results show that the flapping angle of the resonant wings becomes a maximum value at the resonant frequency of 11 Hz, and thrust force at this frequency is 7.8 gf, which is 35 percent larger than that of non-resonant wings. These results demonstrate the proposed wing with a thin plate is effective at low frequencies near 11 Hz. Furthermore, a non-tethered robot with four resonant wings driven by a DC motor and a lithium polymer buttery successfully flew at the resonant frequency of the wings.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2012
  • Y. Sakai · H. Koike · K. Suzuki · H. Takanobu · H. Miura
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper discusses a biomimetic water strider robots that is fabricated using MEMS (micro electromechanical systems) techniques. Lift, pull-off and thrust forces of the supporting legs have been measured. The robot has a "origami structure" that is assembled by folding a flat brass plate. The robot successfully walked in the tripod gait at 300 mm/min, and also moved on the surface of water at 600 mm/min.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2010
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes insect-inspired wall-climbing robot that is capable of walking on a smooth vertical surface utilizing surface tension forces. The adhesion mechanism of the robot is inspired from the attachment system of ants, which is responsible for a thin film of secreted liquid between the adhesive organs and the surface. Two kinds of adhesive pads made of PDMS and glass were fabricated using MEMS techniques and adhesive properties were measured. Furthermore, a hexapod robot with the adhesive pads installed on its feet was developed. The robot weighs 9.5g and walks in the alternating tripod gait. It successfully walked on vertical and inverted glass surfaces.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Advanced Mechanical Design Systems and Manufacturing
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) actuation of liquid droplets for transportation of micromechanical parts. As dimensions of mechanical parts decrease, surface tension and electrostatic force become dominant compared to gravity force. Recent studies show that these forces can be utilized for actuation of liquid droplets and transportation of micromechanical elements. In this study, behavior of liquid droplet actuated by EWOD on a single substrate is analyzed using a high speed camera. Effects of applied voltage, switching frequency, and volume of the droplet are investigated experimentally. Furthermore, application of EWOD actuation to micro transportation systems is proposed. Surface properties for the conveyer pad are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2010 · Journal of Advanced Mechanical Design Systems and Manufacturing
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes a robot that pseudo-grows up. This robot that pseudo-grow up by enabling the change in two kinds of figures such as infant and adult because of the expansion and contraction of the body, the head, the arm, and the leg. The walking operation was taken up as operation that showed the influence of growth. It succeeded in the reproduction of person's life by expansion and contraction and the walking operation.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2009
  • K. Suzuki · H. Koike · H. Takanobu · H. Miura
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes a bio mimetic water strider robot with microfabricated hydrophobic legs. Various kinds of supporting legs with hydrophobic microstructures on their surfaces were developed using MEMS (Microelectromechanical Systems) techniques. The lift and pull off forces of these supporting legs were analyzed theoretically and then measured. The experimental results were in good agreement with the calculations. Water strider robot with twelve micro fabricated legs driven by a vibration motor successfully moved on a water surface and also made left/right turns by exploiting differences in the resonant frequencies of the legs.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2009
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Personal robots and robot technology (RT)- based assistive devices are expected to play a major role in Japan's elderly-dominated society, both for joint activities with their human partners and for participation in community life. These new devices should be capable of smooth and natural adaptation and interaction with their human partners and the environment, should be able to communicate naturally with humans, and should never have a negative effect on their human partners, neither physical nor emotional. To achieve this smooth and natural integration between humans and robots, we need first to investigate and clarify how these interactions are carried out. Therefore, we developed the portable bioinstrumentation system WB-2 (Waseda bioinstrumentation system No.2), which can measure the movements of the head, the arms, and the hands (position, velocity, and acceleration), as well as several physiological parameters (electrical activity of the heart respiration, perspiration, pulse wave, and so on), to objectively measure and understand the physical and physiological effects of the interaction between robots and humans. In this paper we present our development of the Inertial Measurement Unit, which is at the heart of our new motion-capture system that replaces the system used in the Waseda bioinstrumentation system No.1 refined (WB-1R). Some preliminary results of experiments with the unit are also presented and analyzed.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Jan 2008
  • K. Suzuki · H. Takanobu · K. Noya · H. Koike · H. Miura
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper discusses biomimetic water strider robots that have microfabricated hydrophobic legs. Various kinds of supporting legs with hydrophobic microstructures on their surfaces were developed using MEMS (micro electromechanical systems) techniques. The lift and pull-off forces of these supporting legs were analyzed theoretically and then measured. The experimental results were in good agreement with the calculations. Two different mechanisms for autonomous water strider robots were developed. One robot with twelve microfabricated legs driven by a vibration motor successfully moved on a water surface and also made left/right turns by exploiting differences in the resonant frequencies of the legs. The other robot, with six microstructured legs, moved on water through elliptical motion of its middle legs, which is similar to the motion of actual water striders.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Dec 2007
  • Source
    M. Zecca · N. Endo · K. Itoh · K. Imanishi · M. Saito · N. Nanba · H. Takanobu · A. Takanishi
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Personal Robots and Robot Technology (RT)-based assistive devices are expected to play a major role in Japan's elderly-dominated society, both for joint activities with their human partners and for participation in community life. These new devices should be capable of smooth and natural adaptation and interaction with their human partners and the environment, should be able to communicate naturally with humans, and should never have a negative effect on their human partners, neither physical nor emotional. To achieve this smooth and natural integration between humans and robots, we need first to investigate and clarify how these interactions are carried out. Therefore, we developed the portable Bioinstrumentation System WB-1R (Waseda Bioinstrumentation system no.l Refined), which can measure the movements of the head, the arms, the hands (position, velocity, and acceleration), as well as several physiological parameters (electrocardiogram, respiration, perspiration, pulse wave, and so on), to objectively measure and understand the physical and physiological effects of the interaction between robots and humans. In this paper we present our development of the head and hands motion capture systems as additional modules for the Waseda Bioinstrumentation system No.1 (WB-1). The preliminary experimental results, given the inexpensiveness of the systems, are good for our purposes.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Oct 2007
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has become very common in recent years, thanks to the many advantages it provides for patients. Since it is difficult for surgeons to learn and master this technique, several training methods and metrics have been proposed, both to improve the surgeon's abilities and also to assess his/her skills. This paper presents the use of the WB-1R (Waseda bioinstrumentation system no.1 refined), which was developed at Waseda University, Tokyo, to investigate and analyze a surgeon's movements and performance. Specifically, the system can measure the movements of the head, the arms, and the hands, as well as several physiological parameters. In this paper we present our experiment to evaluate a surgeon's ability to handle surgical instruments and his/her depth perception using a laparoscopic view. Our preliminary analysis of a subset of the acquired data (i.e. comfort of the subjects; the amount of time it took o complete each exercise; and respiration) clearly shows that the expert surgeon and the group of medical students perform very differently. Therefore, WB-1R (or, better, a newer version tailored specifically for use in the operating room) could provide important additional information to help assess the experience and performance of surgeons, thus leading to the development of a global performance index for surgeons during MIS. These analyses and modeling, moreover, are an important step towards the automatization and the robotic assistance of the surgical gesture.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Oct 2007
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this research is the development of a patient robot for use in actual clinical training. Electro pneumatic regulators and electromagnetic valves incorporated in the robot is operated by manipulating air cylinders. It is possible to conduct training assuming several patients enabling trainees to learn a flexible response under a wide range of circumstances. A simple interface was used for ease of operation. Further, a built-in sensor inside the oral cavity responds to the trainee's actions leading to a vomiting reflex and pain during drilling teeth. Attaching the pain sensor to the body of test subjects, will also be useful for training social service workers during nursing care examinations.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Jun 2007
  • H. Takanobu · M. Katsuyama · K Suzuki · H Miura · J. Okamoto · M.G. Fujie · H. Iseki
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes the development and experimental results of a master manipulator for the Workspace-creation manipulator for minimally invasive surgery. The master manipulator was developed for the purpose of maximizing the doctor's facility for performing operations. Therefore, the master manipulator needs to be easy to use for the doctor. This master manipulator which was developed has three degrees of freedom to control the Workspace-creation manipulator that has eleven degrees of freedom. And the authors studied new operation system with image of MRI.
    No preview · Conference Paper · Jun 2007
  • Kenji Suzuki · Hideaki Yamada · Hirofumi Miura · Hideaki Takanobu
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes three-dimensional microstructures fabricated using a simple self-assembly process involving the thermal shrinkage of polyimide. The proposed method enables hinged structures to be automatically rotated out of the wafer plane and to remain bent without the need to use any interlocking mechanisms. The hinged structures were fabricated using surface micromachining techniques involving heating in a furnace. An increase in the bending angle due to the shrinkage of polyimide was observed with increasing heating temperature, heating time, and length of the polyimide hinge. Of these three parameters, the heating time was found to be the most suitable for precise control of the bending angle. Furthermore, microcubes were fabricated by this method and the self-assembly process was successfully visualized using a CCD camera.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2007 · Microsystem Technologies
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Among social infrastructure technologies, Robot Technology (RT) is expected to play an important role in solving the problems of the aging society. New generations of personal robots are expected to be capable of assisting humans in a variety of contexts and thus of interacting and communicating with them effectively and even in a friendly and natural way. Expressing human-like emotions is an important capability to this aim. The objectives of this work are the design and development of two five-fingered robotic hands for a humanoid upper body able to generate and express emotions. The specific design goals have been grasping and expression of emotions through hand gestures, as a complement to facial expression of emotions. The paper presents the design process of the robotic hands, named RCH-1 (Robocasa Hand No. 1), starting from the requirements deriving from their use in grasping and gestures. The resulting robotic hands are described in detail, together with the hand sensory systems. Experimental trials are then presented, aimed at assessing the hand performance and at validating their effectiveness in grasping and emotion expression, when mounted on the emotion expression humanoid robot WE-4R (Waseda Eye No. 4 Refined).
    No preview · Article · Mar 2007 · International Journal of Humanoid Robotics
  • Hideaki Yamada · Kenji Suzuki · Hirofumi Miura · Hideaki Takanobu
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This paper describes three-dimensional (3D) micro structures fabricated using a simple self-assembly process involving the thermal shrinkage of polyimide. The proposed method enables hinged structures automatically to be rotated out of the wafer plane and to remain bent without the need to use any interlocking mechanisms. The hinged structures were fabricated using surface micromachining techniques involving heating in a furnace. An increase in the bending angle due to the shrinkage of polyimide was observed with increasing heating time, heating temperature, and length of the polyimide hinge. Of these three parameters, the heating time was found to be the most suitable for control of the bending angle. Microcubes were fabricated by this method and the self-assembly process was successfully visualized using a CCD camera. Furthermore, the hinged structures were actuated in external magnetic field after the self-assembly.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2007 · IEEJ Transactions on Sensors and Micromachines
  • Source
    Conference Paper: Dental Patient Robot
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Presently, the simple head model (hereinafter referred to as phantom for practical training) with dentition models is used for dental therapy training. We suggested the patient robot for dental therapy training (hereinafter referred to as patient robot) as one of the practical applications of the humanoid robot technology, and we actually developed patient robots. One of them is the general model provided with 14 degrees of freedom (DOF) in addition to a tongue and lips that may interfere with treatment, allowing reflection of any change in simple expression. Also, active motions of the neck or hand allow various impediments so as to interfere with the actual potential treatment. The robot allowed trainees to do dental therapy training closer to the actual practice involving avoidance of these risks
    Preview · Conference Paper · Nov 2006
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Personal robots, which are expected to become popular in the future, are required to be active in joint work and community life with humans. Such robots must have no bad physical or psychical effect on humans. The psychical effect of a robot on humans has been subjectively measured using questionnaires. However, it has not been objectively measured yet. Human emotion and the consciousness direction can be measured by physiological parameters and body motion, respectively. Therefore, the bioinstrumentation system WB-1 was developed in order to objectively measure the psychical effect of a robot on a human. It can measure physiological parameters such as respiration, heart rate, perspiration and pulse wave, and arm motion. Analyzing human stress in the interaction with a robot from electrocardiogram, the robot could generate a motion for decreasing the stress
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Oct 2006
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Personal robots, which are expected to become popular in the future, are required to be active in joint work and community life with human. Therefore, the objective of this study is the development of new mechanisms and functions for a humanoid robot to express emotions and to communicate naturally with human. We developed both the mental model from psychological point of view and the Emotion Expression Humanoid Robot WE-4RII (Waseda Eye No.4 Refined II) from engineered point of view. In this paper, a co-associative memory model using mutually coupled chaotic neural networks was proposed and implemented in WE-4RII as its mental model. We confirmed that the robot could generate the behavior depending on its mood in response to a stimulus.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jan 2006
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A Personal Robot is expected to become popular in the future. It is required to be active in joint work and community life with humans. Therefore, we have been developing new mechanisms and functions for a humanoid robot that can express emotions and communicate naturally with humans. In this paper, we present the mechanical design of the Emotion Expression Humanoid Robot WE-4RII, which was developed by integrating the Humanoid Robot Hands RCH-1 into the previous version WE-4R. The robot has four of the five human senses for detecting external stimuli: visual, tactile, auditory and olfactory, and 59-DOFs for expressing motion and emotions. It is capable of expressing seven basic emotional patterns.
    No preview · Chapter · Jan 2006

Publication Stats

926 Citations
15.93 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001-2010
    • Kogakuin University
      • Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 1993-2007
    • Waseda University
      • • Graduate School of Science and Engineering
      • • Department of Mechanical Engineering
      Edo, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 2005
    • National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences
      Tsukuba, Ibaraki, Japan
  • 2003
    • Università degli studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale
      Cassino, Latium, Italy