Hidetoshi Kumagai

University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, United States

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Publications (34)170.35 Total impact

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    Yuichi Ikeda · Hidetoshi Kumagai · Yoshihiro Motozawa · Jun-ichi Suzuki
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · International Heart Journal
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Myocarditis is a clinically severe disease; however, no effective treatment has been established. The aim of this study was to determine whether cacao bean (Theobroma cacao) polyphenols ameliorate autoimmune myocarditis. We used an experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) model in Balb/c mice. Mice with induced EAM were treated with a cacao polyphenol extract (CPE, n=12) or vehicle (n=12). On day 21, hearts were harvested and analyzed. Elevated heart weight to body weight and fibrotic area ratios as well as high cardiac cell infiltration were observed in the vehicle-treated EAM mice. However, these increases were significantly suppressed in the CPE-treated mice. Reverse transcriptase-PCR revealed that mRNA expressions of interleukin (Il)-1β, Il-6, E-selectin, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and collagen type 1 were lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. The mRNA expressions of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase (Nox)2 and Nox4 were increased in the vehicle-treated EAM hearts, although CPE treatment did not significantly suppress the transcription levels. However, compared with vehicle treatment of EAM hearts, CPE treatment significantly suppressed hydrogen peroxide concentrations. Cardiac myeloperoxidase activity, the intensity of dihydroethidium staining and the phosphorylation of nuclear factor-κB p65 were also lower in the CPE group compared with the vehicle group. Our data suggest that CPE ameliorates EAM in mice. CPE is a promising dietary supplement to suppress cardiovascular inflammation and oxidative stress.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Hypertension Research
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The activity of the renin–angiotensin system is known to be a key factor in the pathophysiology of heart failure and renal failure. Irbesartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker, has non-hemodynamic cardiovascular and renal protective effects. However, the effect of irbesartan on heart failure complicated by renal failure has not yet been elucidated. Thus the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of irbesartan on the pathophysiology of cardiorenal syndrome in a rat model. Subtotal nephrectomy (NTX) was performed in rats was using a two-step surgical procedure. Twenty-eight days after NTX, myocardial infarction (MI) was induced by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The animals were orally administered vehicle or irbesartan (10 mg kg−1 day−1) after NTX. The hearts were harvested 28 days after MI. MI with NTX model rats showed an impaired post-MI survival rate and enhanced cardiac inflammation in comparison to MI without NTX rats. Although irbesartan treatment did not improve the survival rate, it suppressed cardiac inflammation, left ventricular function decline, cardiac fibrosis, hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes and renal fibrosis in MI with NTX rats. Moreover, increases in protein expression levels related to oxidative stress and inflammation (NADPH oxidase 4, phospho-nuclear factor-κB and phospho-c-Jun) observed in the hearts of non-treated MI with NTX rats were attenuated by irbesartan treatment. These effects of irbesartan treatment were independent of blood pressure. We conclude that irbesartan has a cardioprotective effect after MI when renal dysfunction is present.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Hypertension Research
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is associated with elevated morbidity and mortality with cardiovascular (CV) disease. The guideline recommends smoking cessation and antiplatelet/antithrombotic drugs for asymptomatic and symptomatic PAD patients. It also recommends that PAD patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) should be considered to receive endovascular and open surgical treatment for limb salvage. Although PAD patients with CLI receive these treatments, they are sometimes unable to deliver sufficient blood flow to eliminate their symptoms. Thus specific strategies are needed to promote enough blood flow. To establish the effective method, many investigations have been performed using cell-based therapy. Endothelial progenitor cells, mononuclear cells and mesenchymal stem cells have been well investigated in clinical settings. To induce angiogenesis, vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) have also been transfected in PAD patients. Among them, HGF is the most promising factor because it can induce angiogenesis without the induction of vascular inflammation and increased permeability. In this review article, we summarize current treatments and investigational drugs of PAD.Hypertension Research advance online publication, 3 December 2015; doi:10.1038/hr.2015.134.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Hypertension Research
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Early human mummies examined recently by computed-tomography scans demonstrated a high prevalence of vascular calcification, a pathognomonic sign of atherosclerosis, which was correlated with estimated age at death. Early populations had little exposure to modern-day metabolic risk factors: these observations thus suggest that humans have an inherent age-dependent predisposition to atherosclerosis. Premature aging syndromes are extremely rare genetic disorders that exhibit clinical phenotypes resembling accelerated aging, including severe atherosclerosis, but those phenotypes are usually segmental. Controversy persists therefore, regarding the extent to which the molecular mechanisms underlying premature aging syndromes overlap with those of physiological aging. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) and Werner syndrome are well-characterized premature aging syndromes. HGPS is caused by gain-of-function mutations in the LMNA gene that results in the accumulation of a mutant nuclear protein, called progerin, at the nuclear rim. In contrast, loss-of-function mutations in Werner syndrome ATP-dependent helicase (WRN) lead to Werner syndrome. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which can differentiate into vascular cells to maintain vascular homeostasis in response to injury, are severely affected in these syndromes. Mechanistically, either aberrant expression of progerin or loss of WRN protein in MSCs alters heterochromatin structure, resulting in premature senescence and exhaustion of functional MSCs in premature aging syndromes. Surprisingly, vascular cells and MSCs in elderly healthy individuals showed progerin expression and decreased expression levels of WRN, respectively. Studying these rare genetic disorders could thus provide valuable insights into age-related vascular diseases that occur in the general population.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · The Canadian journal of cardiology
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    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · International Heart Journal
  • No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · International Heart Journal
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Oxidative stress has been implicated in cardiac remodeling (cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy), which impairs cardiac function and metabolism; therefore, it is anticipated antioxidative compounds will have protective properties against cardiac remodeling. Luteolin (3',4',5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone), a widely distributed flavonoid found in many herbal extracts including celery, green pepper, perilla leaves and seeds, and chamomile, is a known to be a potent antioxidant and was previously demonstrated to exert an antifibrotic effect in the lungs and the liver. In this study, we clearly demonstrate that oral pretreatment with the higher-luteolin diet (0.035% (wt/wt)) protected against cardiac fibrosis and hypertrophy as well as a hyperoxidative state in Ang II-infused rats. In cardiac tissue, increased gene expression levels of TGFβ1, CTGF, Nox2, Nox4, ANP, and BNP induced by Ang II were restored by oral pretreatment of this high-luteolin diet. In cultured rat cardiac fibroblasts, H2O2-induced TGFβ1 expression and the phosphorylation of JNK were suppressed by luteolin pretreatment. In conclusion, food-derived luteolin has protective actions against Ang II-induced cardiac remodeling, which could be mediated through attenuation of oxidative stress.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · PLoS ONE
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Angiotensin II (AngII) type I receptor (AT1R) recognizes AngII, a cardiovascular peptide hormone that acts as a terminal effector of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). AT1R belongs to the rhodopsin-like peptidergic family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and serves as a therapeutic target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Classically, AT1R was considered to signal only through G proteins. However, recent studies have revealed that AT1R is capable of activating G protein-independent signaling that is mediated by beta-arrestins. beta-arrestin is a cytosolic scaffold that is recruited to the activated GPCRs. In vitro and ex vivo studies have demonstrated that the activation of the AT1R-beta-arrestin pathway stimulates contractility and exerts prosurvival effects in cardiomyocytes. TRV027, a potent synthetic beta-arrestin-biased ligand for AT1R, specifically activates AT1R-beta-arrestin signaling without stimulating G proteins. In preclinical studies, TRV027 not only produced vasodilation by antagonizing the AT1R-G alpha q pathway but also enhanced cardiac performance by activating AT1R-beta-arrestin signaling. Because of this unique pharmacological profile, TRV027 is now being evaluated in a phase II clinical trial as a novel therapeutic for acute heart failure (AHF).
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · International Heart Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Coronary arterial complications associated with Kawasaki disease (KD), such as a giant coronary aneurysm, determine the relative risk of future cardiac events and require lifelong medical treatment. Here, we describe a 24-year-old man who developed myocardial infarction due to poor adherence to medical treatment for a giant coronary aneurysm in the chronic phase of KD. He was hospitalized two hours after the onset of chest pain. The presence of the giant coronary aneurysm made primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) difficult. However, we were able to perform primary PCI successfully utilizing previous coronary computed tomography (CT) angiographic pictures as a reference. This case provides valuable insight for the management of coronary arterial complications associated with KD. Patients in the chronic phase of KD are usually asymptomatic, even in the presence of giant coronary aneurysms which have been reported to have a high risk of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, patient education is critical for preventing poor adherence to medical treatment for coronary arterial complications. In preparation for potential coronary intervention in the future, it is also useful to perform coronary CT angiography, coronary magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, and/or coronary angiography on a regular basis while patients remain free from serious cardiac events.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · International Heart Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Orexins are a family of neuropeptides that regulate sleep/wakefulness, acting on two G protein-coupled receptors, orexin receptors-1 (OX1R) and -2 (OX2R). Genetic and pharmacologic evidence suggests that orexin receptor agonists, especially OX2R agonist, will be useful for mechanistic therapy of the sleep disorder narcolepsy/cataplexy. We herein report the discovery of a potent (EC50 on OX2R = 0.023 µM) and OX2R-selective (OX1R/OX2R EC50 ratio = 70) agonist, 4'-methoxy-N,N-dimethyl-3'-[N-(3-{[2-(3-methylbenzamido)ethyl]amino}phenyl)sulfamoyl]-(1,1'-biphenyl)-3-carboxamide 26.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Angiotensin II (AngII) type I receptor (AT1R) recognizes AngII, a cardiovascular peptide hormone that acts as a terminal effector of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). AT1R belongs to the rhodopsin-like peptidergic family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and serves as a therapeutic target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, such as hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Classically, AT1R was considered to signal only through G proteins. However, recent studies have revealed that AT1R is capable of activating G protein-independent signaling that is mediated by β-arrestins. β-arrestin is a cytosolic scaffold that is recruited to the activated GPCRs. In vitro and ex vivo studies have demonstrated that the activation of the AT1R-β-arrestin pathway stimulates contractility and exerts prosurvival effects in cardiomyocytes. TRV027, a potent synthetic β-arrestin-biased ligand for AT1R, specifically activates AT1R-β-arrestin signaling without stimulating G proteins. In preclinical studies, TRV027 not only produced vasodilation by antagonizing the AT1R-Gαq pathway but also enhanced cardiac performance by activating AT1R-β-arrestin signaling. Because of this unique pharmacological profile, TRV027 is now being evaluated in a phase II clinical trial as a novel therapeutic for acute heart failure (AHF).
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · International Heart Journal
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Coronary arterial complications associated with Kawasaki disease (KD), such as a giant coronary aneurysm, determine the relative risk of future cardiac events and require lifelong medical treatment. Here, we describe a 24-year-old man who developed myocardial infarction due to poor adherence to medical treatment for a giant coronary aneurysm in the chronic phase of KD. He was hospitalized two hours after the onset of chest pain. The presence of the giant coronary aneurysm made primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) difficult. However, we were able to perform primary PCI successfully utilizing previous coronary computed tomography (CT) angiographic pictures as a reference. This case provides valuable insight for the management of coronary arterial complications associated with KD. Patients in the chronic phase of KD are usually asymptomatic, even in the presence of giant coronary aneurysms which have been reported to have a high risk of morbidity and mortality. Therefore, patient education is critical for preventing poor adherence to medical treatment for coronary arterial complications. In preparation for potential coronary intervention in the future, it is also useful to perform coronary CT angiography, coronary magnetic resonance (MR) angiography, and/or coronary angiography on a regular basis while patients remain free from serious cardiac events.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · International Heart Journal
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Identification of cognate ligands for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) provides a starting point for understanding novel regulatory mechanisms. Although GPCR ligands have typically been evaluated through the activation of heterotrimeric G proteins, recent studies have shown that GPCRs signal not only through G proteins but also through β-arrestins. As such, monitoring β-arrestin signaling instead of G protein signaling will increase the likelihood of identifying currently unknown ligands, including β-arrestin-biased agonists. Here, we developed a cell-based assay for monitoring ligand-dependent GPCR-β-arrestin interaction via β-lactamase enzyme fragment complementation. Inter alia, β-lactamase is a superior reporter enzyme because of its cell-permeable fluorescent substrate. This substrate makes the assay non-destructive and compatible with fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). In a reporter cell, complementary fragments of β-lactamase (α and ω) were fused to β-arrestin 2 and GPCR, respectively. Ligand stimulation initiated the interaction of these chimeric proteins (β-arrestin-α and GPCR-ω), and this inducible interaction was measured through reconstituted β-lactamase activity. Utilizing this system, we screened various mammalian tissue extracts for agonistic activities on human bombesin receptor subtype 3 (hBRS3). We purified peptide E as a low-affinity ligand for hBRS3, which was also found to be an agonist for the other two mammalian bombesin receptors such as gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) and neuromedin B receptor (NMBR). Successful purification of peptide E has validated the robustness of this assay. We conclude that our newly developed system will facilitate the discovery of GPCR ligands.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) play a critical role in many physiological systems and represent one of the largest families of signal-transducing receptors. The number of GPCRs at the cell surface regulates cellular responsiveness to their cognate ligands, and the number of GPCRs, in turn, is dynamically controlled by receptor endocytosis. Recent studies have demonstrated that GPCR endocytosis, in addition to affecting receptor desensitization and resensitization, contributes to acute G protein-mediated signaling. Thus, endocytic GPCR behavior has a significant impact on various aspects of physiology. In this study, we developed a novel GPCR internalization assay to facilitate characterization of endocytic GPCR behavior. We genetically engineered chimeric GPCRs by fusing HaloTag (a catalytically inactive derivative of a bacterial hydrolase) to the N-terminal end of the receptor (HT-GPCR). HaloTag has the ability to form a stable covalent bond with synthetic HaloTag ligands that contain fluorophores or a high-affinity handle (such as biotin) and the HaloTag reactive linker. We selectively labeled HT-GPCRs at the cell surface with a HaloTag PEG ligand, and this pulse-chase covalent labeling allowed us to directly monitor the relative number of internalized GPCRs after agonist stimulation. Because the endocytic activities of GPCR ligands are not necessarily correlated with their agonistic activities, applying this novel methodology to orphan GPCRs, or even to already characterized GPCRs, will increase the likelihood of identifying currently unknown ligands that have been missed by conventional pharmacological assays.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    Yuichi Ikeda · Hidetoshi Kumagai · Amber Skach · Makito Sato · Masashi Yanagisawa
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Circulating glucocorticoid levels oscillate with a robust circadian rhythm, yet the physiological relevance of this rhythmicity remains unclear. Here, we show that modulation of circadian glucocorticoid oscillation by enhancing its amplitude leads to anxiolytic-like behavior. We observed that mice with adrenal subcapsular cell hyperplasia (SCH), a common histological change in the adrenals, are less anxious than mice without SCH. This behavioral change was found to be dependent on the higher amplitude of glucocorticoid oscillation, although the total glucocorticoid secretion is not increased in these mice. Genetic and pharmacologic experiments demonstrated that intermediate opioid peptides secreted from SCH activate CXCR7, a β-arrestin-biased G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), to augment circadian oscillation of glucocorticoid levels in a paracrine manner. Furthermore, recapitulating this paracrine axis by subcutaneous administration of a synthetic CXCR7 ligand is sufficient to induce anxiolytic-like behavior. Adrenocortical β-arrestin-biased GPCR signaling is a potential target for modulating circadian glucocorticoid oscillation and emotional behavior.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2013 · Cell
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Mixed-lineage-leukemia (MLL) fusion oncogenes are closely involved in infant acute leukemia, which is frequently accompanied by mutations or overexpression of FMS-like receptor tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3). Earlier studies have shown that MLL fusion proteins induced acute leukemia together with another mutation, such as an FLT3 mutant, in mouse models. However, little has hitherto been elucidated regarding the molecular mechanism of the cooperativity in leukemogenesis. Using murine model systems of the MLL-fusion-mediated leukemogenesis leading to oncogenic transformation in vitro and acute leukemia in vivo, this study characterized the molecular network in the cooperative leukemogenesis. This research revealed that MLL fusion proteins cooperated with activation of Ras in vivo, which was substitutable for Raf in vitro, synergistically, but not with activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5), to induce acute leukemia in vivo as well as oncogenic transformation in vitro. Furthermore, Hoxa9, one of the MLL-targeted critical molecules, and activation of Ras in vivo, which was replaceable with Raf in vitro, were identified as fundamental components sufficient for mimicking MLL-fusion-mediated leukemogenesis. These findings suggest that the molecular crosstalk between aberrant expression of Hox molecule(s) and activated Raf may have a key role in the MLL-fusion-mediated-leukemogenesis, and may thus help develop the novel molecularly targeted therapy against MLL-related leukemia.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2009 · Leukemia: official journal of the Leukemia Society of America, Leukemia Research Fund, U.K
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: We have analyzed leukocyte mono-Ig-like receptor 5 (LMIR5) as an activating receptor among paired LMIRs. Mouse LMIR5 (mLMIR5) is expressed in myeloid cells such as mast cells, granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Cross-linking of transduced mLMIR5 in bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs) caused activation events, including cytokine production, cell survival, degranulation, and adhesion to the extracellular matrix. mLMIR5 associated with DAP12 and to a lesser extent with DAP10, and mLMIR5-mediated functions of BMMCs were strongly inhibited by DAP12 deficiency. Importantly, cross-linking of endogenous mLMIR5 induced Syk-dependent activation of fetal liver-derived mast cells. Unlike mLMIR5, cross-linking of human LMIR5 (hLMIR5) induced cytokine production of BMMCs even in the absence of both DAP12 and DAP10, suggesting the existence of unidentified adaptors. Interestingly, hLMIR5 possessed a tyrosine residue (Y188) in the cytoplasmic region. Signaling via Y188 phosphorylation played a predominant role in hLMIR5-mediated cytokine production in DAP12-deficient, but not wild-type BMMCs. In addition, experiments using DAP10/DAP12 double-deficient BMMCs suggested the existence of Y188 phoshorylation-dependent and -independent signals from unidentified adaptors. Collectively, although both mouse and human LMIR5 play activatory roles in innate immunity cells, the functions of LMIR5 were differentially regulated in mouse versus human cells.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2008 · Blood
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta)-stimulated clone-22 (TSC-22) was originally isolated as a TGF-beta-inducible gene. In this study, we identified TSC-22 as a potential leukemia suppressor. Two types of FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 (Flt3) mutations are frequently found in acute myeloid leukemia: Flt3-ITD harboring an internal tandem duplication in the juxtamembrane domain associated with poor prognosis and Flt3-TKD harboring a point mutation in the kinase domain. Comparison of gene expression profiles between Flt3-ITD- and Flt3-TKD-transduced Ba/F3 cells revealed that constitutive activation of Flt3 by Flt3-TKD, but not Flt3-ITD, upregulated the expression of TSC-22. Importantly, treatment with an Flt3 inhibitor PKC412 or an Flt3 small interfering RNA decreased the expression level of TSC-22 in Flt3-TKD-transduced cells. Forced expression of TSC-22 suppressed the growth and accelerated the differentiation of several leukemia cell lines into monocytes, in particular, in combination with differentiation-inducing reagents. On the other hand, a dominant-negative form of TSC-22 accelerated the growth of Flt3-TKD-transduced 32Dcl.3 cells. Collectively, these results suggest that TSC-22 is a possible target of leukemia therapy.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2007 · Leukemia
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    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The leukocyte mono-Ig-like receptor (LMIR) belongs to a new family of paired immunoreceptors. In this study, we analyzed activating receptor LMIR4/CLM-5 as a counterpart of inhibitory receptor LMIR3/CLM-1. LMIR4 is expressed in myeloid cells, including granulocytes, macrophages, and mast cells, whereas LMIR3 is more broadly expressed. The association of LMIR4 with Fc receptor-gamma among immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-bearing molecules was indispensable for LMIR4-mediated functions of bone marrow-derived mast cells, but dispensable for its surface expression. Cross-linking of LMIR4 led to Lyn- and Syk-dependent activation of bone marrow-derived mast cells, resulting in cytokine production and degranulation, whereas that of LMIR3 did not. The triggering of LMIR4 and TLR4 synergistically caused robust cytokine production in accordance with enhanced activation of ERK, whereas the co-ligation of LMIR4 and LMIR3 dramatically abrogated cytokine production. Notably, intraperitoneal administration of lipopolysaccharide strikingly up-regulated LMIR3 and down-regulated LMIR4, whereas that of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor up-regulated both LMIR3 and LMIR4 in granulocytes. Cross-linking of LMIR4 in bone marrow granulocytes also resulted in their activation, which was enhanced by lipopolysaccharide. Collectively, these results suggest that the innate immune system is at least in part regulated by the qualitative and quantitative balance of the paired receptors LMIR3 and LMIR4.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2007 · Journal of Biological Chemistry