E. Bonifazi

Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modène, Emilia-Romagna, Italy

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Publications (214)104.29 Total impact

  • E. Bonifazi · A. Milano
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    ABSTRACT: The histiocytoses are diseases caused by the proliferation of histiocytes in various organs, including the skin; they have a very variable clinical spectrum and prognosis ranging from an often fatal multisystem involvement to a self-healing single lesion in a single organ. The classification of histiocytosis, which is based on the origin cell and malignancy potential, divides them into Langerhans cell histiocytosis (Class I), non-Langerhans histiocytosis (Class II) and malignant histiocytosis (Class III). In each of these classes numerous clinical forms have been described, but these forms according to some Authors only represent different developmental stages of the same disease. Letterer-Siwe disease is the most frequent form among Class I histiocytoses and juvenile xanthogranuloma and Rosai-Dorfman disease are the most frequent forms among Class II Histiocytoses. In Class I histiocytoses the histologic examination is not able to distinguish between severe and mild forms; the observation of the skin lesions can help in this differentiation.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • E. Bonifazi · A. Milano
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    ABSTRACT: The occult dysraphism, due to a lack of fusion in the midline of mesenchymal and/or neural structures, is a frequent problem usually devoid of pathological significance but in rare cases associated with severe neurological manifestations sometimes incompatible with life. In 50% of cases of occult dysraphism there is a skin marker that facilitates its early recognition. The coexistence of cutaneous and neurological signs is due to the common ectodermal origin of the two tissues. Over the past eight years we observed 19 cases (9 M) of dysraphism. In 12 cases (8 M) of cranial dysraphism the most common skin marker is a collar or a tuft of thicker and darker hair, which often hides a plaque of ectopic meningeal tissue or a dermal sinus. In 7 cases (2 M) of spinal dysraphism the most significant skin marker is lipoma, but many skin signs seemingly trivial when are located in the midline, can be a clue to the diagnosis of a spinal dysraphism, especially if two or more than two. These include a flat vascular lesion that has features overlapping the very frequent infantile salmon patch.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • E. Bonifazi
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    ABSTRACT: Lupus erythematosus panniculitis is a rare variant of lupus erythematosus characterized by a lymphocytic infiltrate prevailing in the deep dermis and subcutaneous fat tissue; it has been described exceptionally even in children. Here is presented a case that for its very early onset (8 months old) and its sensitivity to cold led to discuss the differential diagnosis from an Aicardi-Goutières type inherited skin disorder.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • A. Milano · E. Bonifazi

    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • E. Bonifazi · A. Milano
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    ABSTRACT: The black skin differs from the white skin essentially for a higher amount of melanin in the epidermis due to increased functionality of melanocytes. The production of melanin varies in relation to the intensity of light radiation and the majority of individuals who live in a certain latitude has a phototype appropriate at that latitude. When, for various reasons, individuals with very different skin phototype live at the same latitude, light radiation can cause side effects both in subjects with phototype inappropriate for defect (sunburn, skin cancer, etc.) and in subjects with phototype inadequate for excess (reduced production of vitamin D resulting in rickets, cancer, etc.). The skin disorders on black skin differ from those on white skin due to lack of erythema and greater esthetic and psychological significance of the white lesions. In this report are reviewed the most important differences in neonatal skin disorders, nevi, fungal infections, acne, atopic dermatitis, pityriasis rosea, vitiligo and diseases of the hair and nails.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2013 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • L. Garofalo · E. Bonifazi

    No preview · Article · Jul 2013 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • F. Caprio · E. Bonifazi
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    ABSTRACT: Tumors originating from the glomus are made up of glomus cells, blood vessels and smooth muscle cells; according to the prevalence of these constituents, we distinguish solid glomus tumors, glomangioma and glomangiomioma, which seem variants of the same tumor or the same vascular malformation, due to mutations in the glomulin gene. In this report we describe a case of family glomangioma in two siblings and their mother. The histological examination of a mother's lesion showed in the dermis a tumor of cuboidal cells arranged in parallel rows around vascular spaces lined by endothelial cells; there were not muscle cells. The histological examination of the two brothers showed the presence in the dermis of a neoformation consisting of large vascular spaces delimited by endothelial cells; there were not glomus cells, nor muscle cells.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2013 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • Cutrone M · Milano A · Rovatti G · Bonifazi E
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    ABSTRACT: We revisit the anatomical variants of the male genitalia (pigmentary changes, variants of the median raphe, pearly penile papules, sebaceous hyperplasia, non-retractable foreskin, smegma pseudocysts), female genitalia (hypertrophy of the labia, vaginal discharge, hymen tags, fusion of the labia minora, furrows and maceration of the lips, vestibular papillomatosis) and anus (infantile perianal protrusion). These anatomical variants can simulate pathological conditions which must be differentiated. The anatomical variants in most cases do not require any therapy.
    No preview · Article · May 2013 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • E. Bonifazi · A. Milano

    No preview · Article · Apr 2013 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • E. Bonifazi · T. Troccoli · F. Mazzotta

    No preview · Article · Apr 2013 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • E. Bonifazi · A. Milano · V. Colonna
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    ABSTRACT: Once discovered the effectiveness of oral propranolol on hemangioma, it was natural for the dermatologist to test its topical activity. Topical therapy of infantile hemangioma is indicated for hemangiomas with prevailing superficial component, when it is useful to accelerate their regression. Before the discovery of propranolol topical therapy of hemangioma was based on corticosteroids and more recently on imiquimod, neither devoid of side effects. After the discovery of propranolol topical therapy was based mainly on beta-blockers, in particular on timolol already commercially available for the therapy of glaucoma and propranolol. 89 children with infantile hemangioma were treated with topical 1% propranolol in this study that highlights the safety and efficacy of the treatment. Topical propranolol, for its lower systemic absorption, is to be preferred to timolol.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2013 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • A. Milano · E. Bonifazi

    No preview · Article · Jan 2013 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • E. Bonifazi · A. Milano

    No preview · Article · Jan 2013 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • E. Bonifazi · A. Milano

    No preview · Article · Jan 2013 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • E. Bonifazi · A. Milano

    No preview · Article · Jan 2013 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • V. Pisani · A. Caniglia · E. Bonifazi
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    ABSTRACT: Like many other inherited skin disorders with autosomal dominant transmission also neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) can manifest itself in a segmental distribution, due to a not early post-zygotic mutation of the gene responsible for NF1. In this paper, we revised the clinical data of 11 cases of childhood segmental NF1. While in adult segmental NF1 prevail forms characterized by the exclusive presence of neurofibromas, in children prevail forms characterized only by café-au-lait macules (CALMs). Both in children and adults is rare to observe the simultaneous presence of café-au-lait macules and neurofibromas. This behavior is probably due to the fact that the CALMs and neurofibromas are due to different mutations, which affect different cell lines, particularly the fibroblast in CALMs and the Schwann cell in neurofibromas.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2012 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • E. Bonifazi · A. Milano
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    ABSTRACT: A 7-month-old little girl presented daily since the 7th day of life erythematous circinate lesions reminiscent of urticaria. The appearance at the age of 9 months of keratotic lesions led to diagnose erythrokeratodermia variabilis (EKV). The histological examination was compatible with the clinical diagnosis. The presence of circinate lesions resembling erythema gyratum repens led to the final diagnosis of EKV Cram-Mevorah.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2012 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • A. Milano · V. Colonna · E. Bonifazi

    No preview · Article · Oct 2012 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • E. Bonifazi · A. Milano

    No preview · Article · Oct 2012 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology
  • V. Salerno · A. Mangione · L. Garofalo · E. Bonifazi
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    ABSTRACT: Oro-facial and ano-genital granulomatosis represent two aspects of the same chronic inflammatory disorder probably related with Crohn's disease. In this paper we describe three pediatric cases of granulomatosis, one oro-facial and two ano-genital; the second of these two cases was followed after years of observation by full-blown Crohn's disease. On the basis of personal data and review of the literature we emphasize the importance of lymphangiectasias, often visible not only histologically but also clinically, for proper diagnosis of the disease.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2012 · European Journal of Pediatric Dermatology

Publication Stats

728 Citations
104.29 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008-2010
    • Università degli Studi di Modena e Reggio Emilia
      • • Department of Life Sciences
      • • Department of Biomedical, Metabolical and Neurosciences
      Modène, Emilia-Romagna, Italy
  • 2002-2010
    • University of Rome Tor Vergata
      • Dipartimento di Biopatologia e Diagnostica per Immagini
      Roma, Latium, Italy
  • 1975-2009
    • Università degli Studi di Bari Aldo Moro
      • Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche ed Oncologia Umana (DIMO)
      Bari, Apulia, Italy