Chris Albanese

Georgetown University, Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

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Publications (153)849.98 Total impact

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    Daniel J Klionsky · Kotb Abdelmohsen · Akihisa Abe · Md Joynal Abedin · Hagai Abeliovich · Abraham Acevedo Arozena · Hiroaki Adachi · Christopher M Adams · Peter D Adams · Khosrow Adeli · [...] · Orsolya Kapuy · Vassiliki Karantza · Md Razaul Karim · Parimal Karmakar · Arthur Kaser · Susmita Kaushik · Thomas Kawula · A Murat Kaynar · Po-Yuan Ke · Zun-Ji Ke ·

    Full-text · Dataset · Feb 2016
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    Full-text · Dataset · Jan 2016
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    Daniel J Klionsky · Kotb Abdelmohsen · Akihisa Abe · Md Joynal Abedin · Hagai Abeliovich · Abraham Acevedo Arozena · Hiroaki Adachi · Christopher M Adams · Peter D Adams · Khosrow Adeli · [...] · Xiao-Feng Zhu · Yuhua Zhu · Shi-Mei Zhuang · Xiaohong Zhuang · Elio Ziparo · Christos E Zois · Teresa Zoladek · Wei-Xing Zong · Antonio Zorzano · Susu M Zughaier ·
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    ABSTRACT: In 2008 we published the first set of guidelines for standardizing research in autophagy. Since then, research on this topic has continued to accelerate, and many new scientists have entered the field. Our knowledge base and relevant new technologies have also been expanding. Accordingly, it is important to update these guidelines for monitoring autophagy in different organisms. Various reviews have described the range of assays that have been used for this purpose. Nevertheless, there continues to be confusion regarding acceptable methods to measure autophagy, especially in multicellular eukaryotes. For example, a key point that needs to be emphasized is that there is a difference between measurements that monitor the numbers or volume of autophagic elements (e.g., autophagosomes or autolysosomes) at any stage of the autophagic process versus those that measure flux through the autophagy pathway (i.e., the complete process including the amount and rate of cargo sequestered and degraded). In particular, a block in macroautophagy that results in autophagosome accumulation must be differentiated from stimuli that increase autophagic activity, defined as increased autophagy induction coupled with increased delivery to, and degradation within, lysosomes (in most higher eukaryotes and some protists such as Dictyostelium) or the vacuole (in plants and fungi). In other words, it is especially important that investigators new to the field understand that the appearance of more autophagosomes does not necessarily equate with more autophagy. In fact, in many cases, autophagosomes accumulate because of a block in trafficking to lysosomes without a concomitant change in autophagosome biogenesis, whereas an increase in autolysosomes may reflect a reduction in degradative activity. It is worth emphasizing here that lysosomal digestion is a stage of autophagy and evaluating its competence is a crucial part of the evaluation of autophagic flux, or complete autophagy. Here, we present a set of guidelines for the selection and interpretation of methods for use by investigators who aim to examine macroautophagy and related processes, as well as for reviewers who need to provide realistic and reasonable critiques of papers that are focused on these processes. These guidelines are not meant to be a formulaic set of rules, because the appropriate assays depend in part on the question being asked and the system being used. In addition, we emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation, and we strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to monitor autophagy. Along these lines, because of the potential for pleiotropic effects due to blocking autophagy through genetic manipulation, it is imperative to target by gene knockout or RNA interference more than one autophagy-related protein. In addition, some individual Atg proteins, or groups of proteins, are involved in other cellular pathways implying that not all Atg proteins can be used as a specific marker for an autophagic process. In these guidelines, we consider these various methods of assessing autophagy and what information can, or cannot, be obtained from them. Finally, by discussing the merits and limits of particular assays, we hope to encourage technical innovation in the field.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Autophagy
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    ABSTRACT: Medulloblastoma (MB), a primitive neuroectodermal tumor, is the most common malignant childhood brain tumor and remains incurable in about a third of patients. Currently, survivors carry a significant burden of late treatment effects. The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a crucial role in influencing cell survival in response to cellular stress and while the p53 pathway is considered a key determinant of anti-tumor responses in many tumors, its role in cell survival in MB is much less well defined. Herein, we report that the experimental drug VMY-1-103 acts through induction of a partial DNA damage-like response as well induction of non-survival autophagy. Surprisingly, the genetic or chemical silencing of p53 significantly enhanced the cytotoxic effects of both VMY and the DNA damaging drug, doxorubicin. The inhibition of p53 in the presence of VMY revealed increased late stage apoptosis, increased DNA fragmentation and increased expression of genes involved in apoptosis, including CAPN12 and TRPM8, p63, p73, BIK, EndoG, CIDEB, P27Kip1 and P21cip1. These data provide the groundwork for additional studies on VMY as a therapeutic drug and support further investigations into the intriguing possibility that targeting p53 function may be an effective means of enhancing clinical outcomes in MB.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · Aging
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    ABSTRACT: Stimulus responsive release of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs), with high recovery rates from their capture platform, is highly desirable for off-chip analyses. Here, we present a temperature responsive polymer coating method to achieve both release as well as culture of viable CTCs captured from patient blood samples.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Lab on a Chip
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    ABSTRACT: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) caused by explosive munitions known as blast TBI is the signature injury in recent military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Diagnostic evaluation of TBI, including blast TBI, is based on clinical history, symptoms, and neuropsychological testing, all of which can result in mis- or under diagnosis of this condition, particularly in the case of TBI of mild-to-moderate severity. Prognosis is currently determined by TBI severity, recurrence and type of pathology and may also be influenced by promptness of clinical intervention when more effective treatments become available. A very important task is prevention of repetitive TBI, particularly when the patient is still symptomatic. For these reasons, the establishment of quantitative biological markers can serve to improve diagnosis and preventative or therapeutic management. In this study, we used a shock-tube model of blast TBI to determine whether manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) can serve as a tool to accurately and quantitatively diagnose mild-to-moderate blast TBI. Mice were subjected to a 30 psig blast and administered a single dose of MnCl2 intraperitoneally. Longitudinal T1-MRI performed at 6, 24, 48, and 72 hours and at 14 and 28 days revealed a marked signal enhancement in the brain of mice exposed to blast as compared to sham controls at nearly all time points. Interestingly, when mice were protected with a polycarbonate body shield during blast exposure, the marked increase in contrast was prevented. We conclude that manganese uptake can serve as a quantitative biomarker for TBI and that MEMRI is a minimally invasive, quantitative approach that can aid in the accurate diagnosis and management of blast TBI. In addition, the prevention of the increased uptake of manganese by body protection strongly suggests that the exposure of an individual to blast risk could benefit from the design of improved body armor.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of neurotrauma
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    Chris Albanese · Maria Laura Avantaggiati

    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Aging
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    ABSTRACT: The expression of members of the Eph family of receptor tyrosine kinases and their ephrin ligands is frequently dysregulated in medulloblastomas. We assessed the expression and functional role of EphB1 in medulloblastoma cell lines and engineered mouse models. mRNA and protein expression profiling showed expression of EphB1 receptor in the human medulloblastoma cell lines DAOY and UW228. EphB1 downregulation reduced cell growth and viability, decreased the expression of important cell cycle regulators, and increased the percentage of cells in G1 phase of the cell cycle. It also modulated the expression of proliferation, and cell survival markers. In addition, EphB1 knockdown in DAOY cells resulted in significant decrease in migration, which correlated with decreased β1-integrin expression and levels of phosphorylated Src. Furthermore, EphB1 knockdown enhanced cellular radiosensitization of medulloblastoma cells in culture and in a genetically engineered mouse medulloblastoma model. Using genetically engineered mouse models, we established that genetic loss of EphB1 resulted in a significant delay in tumor recurrence following irradiation compared to EphB1-expressing control tumors. Taken together, our findings establish that EphB1 plays a key role in medulloblastoma cell growth, viability, migration, and radiation sensitivity, making EphB1 a promising therapeutic target.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Oncotarget
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    Sameh Mikhail · Chris Albanese · Michael J Pishvaian
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    ABSTRACT: The cell cycle is a highly conserved and tightly regulated biological system that controls cellular proliferation and differentiation. The cell cycle regulatory proteins, which include the cyclins, the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs), and the CDK inhibitors, are critical for the proper temporal and spatial regulation of cellular proliferation. Conversely, alterations in cell cycle regulatory proteins, leading to the loss of normal cell-cycle control, are a hallmark of many cancers, including gastrointestinal cancers. Accordingly, overexpression of CDKs and cyclins and by contrast loss of CDK inhibitors, are all linked to gastrointestinal cancers and are often associated with less favorable prognoses and outcomes. Because of the importance that the cell cycle regulatory proteins play in tumorigenesis, currently there is a broad spectrum of cell-cycle inhibitors under development that, as a group, hold promise as effective cancer treatments. In support of this approach to cancer treatment, the growing availability of molecular diagnostics techniques may help in identifying patients who have driving abnormalities in the cell-cycle machinery and are thus more likely to respond to cell-cycle inhibitors. In this review, we discuss the prevalence of cell-cycle abnormalities in patients with gastrointestinal cancers and provide a preclinical and clinical overview of new agents that target cell-cycle abnormalities with a special emphasis on gastrointestinal cancers. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · American Journal Of Pathology
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    Full-text · Dataset · Mar 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Ewing sarcoma (ES) develops in bones or soft tissues of children and adolescents. The presence of bone metastases is one of the most adverse prognostic factors, yet the mechanisms governing their formation remain unclear. As a transcriptional target of EWS-FLI1, the fusion protein driving ES transformation, neuropeptide Y (NPY) is highly expressed and released from ES tumors. Hypoxia up-regulates NPY and activates its pro-metastatic functions. To test the impact of NPY on ES metastatic pattern, ES cell lines, SK-ES1 and TC71, with high and low peptide release, respectively, were used in an orthotopic xenograft model. ES cells were injected into gastrocnemius muscles of SCID/beige mice, the primary tumors excised, and mice monitored for the presence of metastases. SK-ES1 xenografts resulted in thoracic extra-osseous metastases (67%) and dissemination to bone (50%) and brain (25%), while TC71 tumors metastasized to the lungs (70%). Bone dissemination in SK-ES1 xenografts associated with increased NPY expression in bone metastases and its accumulation in bone invasion areas. The genetic silencing of NPY in SK-ES1 cells reduced bone degradation. Our study supports the role for NPY in ES bone invasion and provides new models for identifying pathways driving ES metastases to specific niches and testing anti-metastatic therapeutics.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · Oncotarget
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    ABSTRACT: Ever growing "omics" data and continuously accumulated biological knowledge provide an unprecedented opportunity to identify molecular biomarkers and their interactions that are responsible for cancer phenotypes that can be accurately defined by clinical measurements such as in vivo imaging. Since signaling or regulatory networks are dynamic and context-specific, systematic efforts to characterize such structural alterations must effectively distinguish significant network rewiring from random background fluctuations. Here we introduced a novel integration of network biology and imaging to study cancer phenotypes and responses to treatments at the molecular systems level. Specifically, Differential Dependence Network (DDN) analysis was used to detect statistically significant topological rewiring in molecular networks between two phenotypic conditions, and in vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) was used to more accurately define phenotypic sample groups for such differential analysis. We applied DDN to analyze two distinct phenotypic groups of breast cancer and study how genomic instability affects the molecular network topologies in high-grade ovarian cancer. Further, FDA-approved arsenic trioxide (ATO) and the ND2-SmoA1 mouse model of Medulloblastoma (MB) were used to extend our analyses of combined MRI and Reverse Phase Protein Microarray (RPMA) data to assess tumor responses to ATO and to uncover the complexity of therapeutic molecular biology.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · IEEE/ACM Transactions on Computational Biology and Bioinformatics
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    ABSTRACT: The p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a crucial role in influencing cell fate decisions in response to cellular stress. As p53 elicits cell cycle arrest, senescence or apoptosis, the integrity of the p53 pathway is considered a key determinant of anti-tumor responses. p53 can also promote autophagy, however the role of p53-dependent autophagy in chemosensitivity is poorly understood. VMY-1-103 (VMY), a dansylated analog of purvalanol B, displays rapid and potent anti-tumor activities, however the pathways by which VMY works are not fully defined. Using established prostate cancer cell lines and novel conditionally reprogrammed cells (CRCs) derived from prostate cancer patients; we have defined the mechanisms of VMY-induced prostate cancer cell death. Herein, we show that the cytotoxic effects of VMY required a p53-dependent induction of autophagy, and that inhibition of autophagy abrogated VMY-induced cell death. Cancer cell lines harboring p53 missense mutations evaded VMY toxicity and treatment with a small molecule compound that restores p53 activity re-established VMY-induced cell death. The elucidation of the molecular mechanisms governing VMY-dependent cell death in cell lines, and importantly in CRCs, provides the rationale for clinical studies of VMY, alone or in combination with p53 reactivating compounds, in human prostate cancer.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014 · Oncotarget

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2014 · International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
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    ABSTRACT: Metabotropic glutamate 1 (mGlu) receptor has been proposed as a target for the treatment of metastatic melanoma. Studies have demonstrated that inhibiting the release of glutamate (the natural ligand of mGlu1 receptors), results in a decrease of melanoma tumor growth in mGlu1 receptor-expressing melanomas. Here we demonstrate that mGlu1 receptors, which have been previously characterized as oncogenes, also behave like dependence receptors by creating a dependence on glutamate for sustained cell viability. In the mGlu1 receptor-expressing melanoma cell lines SK-MEL-2 (SK2) and SK-MEL-5 (SK5), we show that glutamate is both necessary and sufficient to maintain cell viability, regardless of underlying genetic mutations. Addition of glutamate increased DNA synthesis, whereas removal of glutamate not only suppressed DNA synthesis but also promoted cell death in SK2 and SK5 melanoma cells. Using genetic and pharmacological inhibitors, we established that this effect of glutamate is mediated by the activation of mGlu1 receptors. The stimulatory potential of mGlu1 receptors was further confirmed in vivo in a melanoma cell xenograft model. In this model, subcutaneous injection of SK5 cells with short hairpin RNA-targeted downregulation of mGlu1 receptors resulted in a decrease in the rate of tumor growth relative to control. We also demonstrate for the first time that a selective mGlu1 receptor antagonist JNJ16259685 ((3,4-Dihydro-2H-pyrano[2,3-b]quinolin-7-yl)-(cis-4-methoxycyclohexyl)-methanone) slows SK2 and SK5 melanoma tumor growth in vivo. Taken together, these data suggest that pharmacological inhibition of mGlu1 receptors may be a novel approach for the treatment of metastatic melanoma.Oncogene advance online publication, 28 July 2014; doi:10.1038/onc.2014.231.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014 · Oncogene
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    ABSTRACT: Mutations of the p53 gene hallmark many human cancers. Several p53 mutant proteins acquire the capability to promote cancer progression and metastasis, a phenomenon defined as Gain of Oncogenic Function (GOF). The downstream targets by which GOF p53 mutants perturb cellular programs relevant to oncogenesis are only partially known. We have previously demonstrated that SLC25A1 (CIC) promotes tumorigenesis, while its inhibition blunts tumor growth. We now report that CIC is a direct transcriptional target of several p53 mutants. We identify a novel interaction between mutant p53 (mutp53) and the transcription factor FOXO-1 which is responsible for regulation of CIC expression levels. Tumor cells harboring mutp53 display higher CIC levels relative to p53 null or wild-type tumors, and inhibition of CIC activity blunts mutp53-driven tumor growth, partially overcoming GOF activity. CIC inhibition also enhances the chemotherapeutic potential of platinum-based agents. Finally, we found that elevated CIC levels predict poor survival outcome in tumors hallmarked by high frequency of p53 mutations. Our results identify CIC as a novel target of mutp53 and imply that the employment of CIC inhibitors may improve survival rates and reduce chemo-resistance in tumors harboring these types of mutations, which are among the most intractable forms of cancers.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · Oncotarget
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    ABSTRACT: Absence of dystrophin makes skeletal muscle more susceptible to injury, resulting in breaches of the plasma membrane and chronic inflammation in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Current management by glucocorticoids has unclear molecular benefits and harsh side effects. It is uncertain whether therapies that avoid hormonal stunting of growth and development, and/or immunosuppression, would be more or less beneficial. Here, we discover an oral drug with mechanisms that provide efficacy through anti-inflammatory signaling and membrane-stabilizing pathways, independent of hormonal or immunosuppressive effects. We find VBP15 protects and promotes efficient repair of skeletal muscle cells upon laser injury, in opposition to prednisolone. Potent inhibition of NF-κB is mediated through protein interactions of the glucocorticoid receptor, however VBP15 shows significantly reduced hormonal receptor transcriptional activity. The translation of these drug mechanisms into DMD model mice improves muscle strength, live-imaging and pathology through both preventive and post-onset intervention regimens. These data demonstrate successful improvement of dystrophy independent of hormonal, growth, or immunosuppressive effects, indicating VBP15 merits clinical investigation for DMD and would benefit other chronic inflammatory diseases.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2013 · EMBO Molecular Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Metal-oxo clusters have been used as building blocks to form hybrid nanomaterials and evaluated as potential MRI contrast agents. We have synthesized a biocompatible co-polymer based on a water stable, non-toxic, mixed-metal oxo cluster, Mn8Fe4O12(O2CCH3)16(H2O)4 or Mn8Fe4 and styrene. The cluster alone was screened by NMR for relaxivity was found to be a promising T2 contrast agent, with r1 = 2.3 mM-1s-1 and r2 = 29.5 mM-1s-1. Initial cell studies on two human prostate cancer cell lines, DU-145 and LNCap, reveal that the cluster has low cytotoxicity and may be potentially used in vivo. By exchanging the acetate for vinyl benzoic acid, the metal oxo-cluster Mn8Fe4(VBA)16 (VBA = vinyl benzoic acid), can be co-polymerized with styrene. Miniemulsion synthesis of this co-polymer was used to form paramagnetic nanobeads (~80 nm diameter), which were also evaluated as a contrast agent for MRI. These highly monodispersed, hybrid nanoparticles have enhanced properties, with the option for surface functionalization, making them a promising tool for biomedicine. Interestingly, both relaxivity measurements and MRI studies show that embedding the Mn8Fe4 core within a polymer matrix decreases r2 effects with little effect on r1, resulting in a positive T1 contrast enhancement.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2013 · ACS Nano
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    ABSTRACT: Despite recent epidemiological evidences linking radiation exposure and a number of human ailments including cancer, mechanistic understanding of how radiation inflicts long-term changes in cerebral cortex, which regulates important neuronal functions, remains obscure. The current study dissects molecular events relevant to pathology in cerebral cortex of 6 to 8 weeks old female C57BL/6J mice two and twelve months after exposure to a γ radiation dose (2 Gy) commonly employed in fractionated radiotherapy. For a comparative study, effects of 1.6 Gy heavy ion56Fe radiation on cerebral cortex were also investigated, which has implications for space exploration. Radiation exposure was associated with increased chronic oxidative stress, oxidative DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and apoptosis. These results when considered with decreased cortical thickness, activation of cell-cycle arrest pathway, and inhibition of DNA double strand break repair factors led us to conclude to our knowledge for the first time that radiation caused aging-like pathology in cerebral cortical cells and changes after heavy ion radiation were more pronounced than γ radiation.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2013 · Aging
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    Full-text · Article · Apr 2013 · Cell cycle (Georgetown, Tex.)

Publication Stats

13k Citations
849.98 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2003-2016
    • Georgetown University
      • • Department of Oncology
      • • Lombardi Cancer Center
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States
    • Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
      • Department of Medicine
      New York, New York, United States
    • Yeshiva University
      • Department of Medicine
      New York, New York, United States
  • 2015
    • The Ohio State University
      Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • 2010
    • COMPREHENSIVE BÖOOD AND CANCER CENTER
      Bakersfield, California, United States
    • University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
      • Touchstone Center for Diabetes
      Dallas, Texas, United States
  • 2009
    • Thomas Jefferson University
      • Kimmel Cancer Center
      Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • 1999-2005
    • Albert Einstein College of Medicine
      • • Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology
      • • Albert Einstein Cancer Center
      New York, New York, United States
    • Albert Einstein Medical Center
      Filadelfia, Pennsylvania, United States
    • University of Western Australia
      Perth City, Western Australia, Australia
  • 2002
    • The University of Calgary
      • Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
      Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • 2001
    • University of California, San Francisco
      San Francisco, California, United States
  • 2000
    • McMaster University
      Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
  • 1989-1999
    • Harvard Medical School
      • Department of Medicine
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1988-1996
    • Massachusetts General Hospital
      • • Department of Medicine
      • • Laboratory of Molecular Endocrinology
      Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • 1994
    • Northwestern University
      Evanston, Illinois, United States