Carlos de Castro

Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States

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Publications (5)29.81 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH) is characterized by chronic, uncontrolled complement activation resulting in elevated intravascular haemolysis and morbidities, including fatigue, dyspnoea, abdominal pain, pulmonary hypertension, thrombotic events (TEs) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The long-term safety and efficacy of eculizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibits terminal complement activation, was investigated in 195 patients over 66 months. Four patient deaths were reported, all unrelated to treatment, resulting in a 3-year survival estimate of 97·6%. All patients showed a reduction in lactate dehydrogenase levels, which was sustained over the course of treatment (median reduction of 86·9% at 36 months), reflecting inhibition of chronic haemolysis. TEs decreased by 81·8%, with 96·4% of patients remaining free of TEs. Patients also showed a time-dependent improvement in renal function: 93·1% of patients exhibited improvement or stabilization in CKD score at 36 months. Transfusion independence increased by 90·0% from baseline, with the number of red blood cell units transfused decreasing by 54·7%. Eculizumab was well tolerated, with no evidence of cumulative toxicity and a decreasing occurrence of adverse events over time. Eculizumab has a substantial impact on the symptoms and complications of PNH and results a significant improvement in patient survival.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2013 · British Journal of Haematology
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    ABSTRACT: The Cancer and Leukemia Group B evaluated oral topotecan administered at 2 schedules and doses for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients with previously untreated primary or therapy-related MDS were eligible. Patients with refractory anemia (RA), RA with ringed sideroblasts, or refractory cytopenia with multilineage dysplasia (RCMD) were eligible only if they were dependent on erythrocyte transfusion, had a platelet count<50,000/microL, or had an absolute neutrophil count<1000/microL with a recent infection that required antibiotics. Patients were randomized to receive oral topotecan either at a dose of 1.2 mg/m2 twice daily for 5 days (Arm A) or once daily for 10 days (Arm B) repeated every 21 days for at least 2 cycles. Responding patients continued until they developed disease progression or unacceptable toxicity or until they had received 2 cycles beyond a complete response. Ninety patients received treatment, including 46 patients on Arm A and 44 patients on Arm B. Partial responses with improvement in all 3 cell lines occurred in 6 patients (7%), and hematologic improvement (in 1 or 2 cell lines) was observed in 21 patients (23%), for an overall response rate of 30%. Response duration was longer on Arm A (23 months vs 14 months; P=.02). Seven of 14 patients with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia responded. There were 8 treatment-related deaths from infection (6 deaths) and bleeding (2 deaths). Diarrhea was the most frequent nonhematologic toxicity (grade 3, 11%; grade 4, 2%; grading determined according to the National Cancer Institute Comman Toxicity Criteria v.2.0). Oral topotecan in the dose and schedules evaluated in this trial demonstrated only a modest response rate with a troublesome toxicity profile in the treatment of MDS.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2008 · Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: The terminal complement inhibitor eculizumab was recently shown to be effective and well tolerated in patients with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). Here, we extended these observations with results from an open-label, non-placebo-controlled, 52-week, phase 3 clinical safety and efficacy study evaluating eculizumab in a broader PNH patient population. Eculizumab was administered by intravenous infusion at 600 mg every 7 +/- 2 days for 4 weeks; 900 mg 7 +/- 2 days later; followed by 900 mg every 14 +/- 2 days for a total treatment period of 52 weeks. Ninety-seven patients at 33 international sites were enrolled. Patients treated with eculizumab responded with an 87% reduction in hemolysis, as measured by lactate dehydrogenase levels (P < .001). Baseline fatigue scores in the FACIT-Fatigue instrument improved by 12.2 +/- 1.1 points (P < .001). Eculizumab treatment led to an improvement in anemia. The increase in hemoglobin level occurred despite a reduction in transfusion requirements from a median of 8.0 units of packed red cells per patient before treatment to 0.0 units per patient during the study (P < .001). Overall, transfusions were reduced 52% from a mean of 12.3 to 5.9 units of packed red cells per patient. Forty-nine patients (51%) achieved transfusion independence for the entire 52-week period. Improvements in hemolysis, fatigue, and transfusion requirements with eculizumab were independent of baseline levels of hemolysis and degree of thrombocytopenia. Quality of life measures were also broadly improved with eculizumab treatment. This study demonstrates that the beneficial effects of eculizumab treatment in patients with PNH are applicable to a broader population of PNH patients than previously studied. This trial is registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00130000.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2008 · Blood
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    Sam O Wanko · Carlos de Castro
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    ABSTRACT: Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a unique chronic lymphoproliferative disorder that can mimic or coexist with other clonal hematologic disorders and has been associated with autoimmune disorders. It should be entertained as an alternative diagnosis in patients with cytopenias being assigned the diagnosis of aplastic anemia, hypoplastic myelodysplastic syndrome, atypical chronic lymphocytic leukemia, B-prolymphocytic leukemia, or idiopathic myelofibrosis. Causative etiology or molecular defects remain unclear, although nonspecific chromosomal and molecular changes have been described. The typical presentation is that of a middle-aged man with an incidental finding of pancytopenia, splenomegaly, and inaspirable bone marrow. Treatment with a purine analogue, cladribine or pentostatin, results in extremely high, durable, overall, and complete response rates, although resistance and relapses do occur. A variant subtype exists and is frequently associated with a poor response. Because of its simplified dosing schedule, cladribine is commonly used as the initial therapy. Treatment of relapsed HCL is dictated by the duration of the preceding remission. Relapsed disease after a prolonged remission can often be successfully retreated with the same initial agent. Resistance in typical HCL is treated with the alternate purine analogue. New agents, such as rituximab and BL22, are actively being evaluated and show promising results in both HCL subtypes. This article uses two patients diagnosed with aplastic anemia and recently seen in consultation at our institution as a springboard to discuss the biology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment options of HCL.
    Preview · Article · Jul 2006 · The Oncologist
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    ABSTRACT: Aberrant DNA methylation, which results in leukemogenesis, is frequent in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and is a potential target for pharmacologic therapy. Decitabine indirectly depletes methylcytosine and causes hypomethylation of target gene promoters. A total of 170 patients with MDS were randomized to receive either decitabine at a dose of 15 mg/m2 given intravenously over 3 hours every 8 hours for 3 days (at a dose of 135 mg/m2 per course) and repeated every 6 weeks, or best supportive care. Response was assessed using the International Working Group criteria and required that response criteria be met for at least 8 weeks. Patients who were treated with decitabine achieved a significantly higher overall response rate (17%), including 9% complete responses, compared with supportive care (0%) (P < .001). An additional 12 patients who were treated with decitabine (13%) achieved hematologic improvement. Responses were durable (median, 10.3 mos) and were associated with transfusion independence. Patients treated with decitabine had a trend toward a longer median time to acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) progression or death compared with patients who received supportive care alone (all patients, 12.1 mos vs. 7.8 mos [P = 0.16]; those with International Prognostic Scoring System intermediate-2/high-risk disease, 12.0 mos vs. 6.8 mos [P = 0.03]; those with de novo disease, 12.6 mos vs. 9.4 mos [P = 0.04]; and treatment-naive patients, 12.3 mos vs. 7.3 mos [P = 0.08]). Decitabine was found to be clinically effective in the treatment of patients with MDS, provided durable responses, and improved time to AML transformation or death. The duration of decitabine therapy may improve these results further.
    Full-text · Article · May 2006 · Cancer

Publication Stats

1k Citations
29.81 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008-2013
    • Duke University
      Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • 2006-2008
    • Duke University Medical Center
      Durham, North Carolina, United States