C Forbes

Kleijnen Systematic Reviews Ltd, York, England, United Kingdom

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Publications (31)100.41 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) increase red blood cell production in patients with chemotherapy-induced anemia (CIA). In Europe, short-acting ESAs (epoetin alfa, epoetin beta, epoetin zeta, and epoetin theta) and a long-acting ESA (darbepoetin alfa) are available to treat CIA. Objective: This systematic review aimed to determine potential dose efficiency associated with the use of different ESAs for the treatment of CIA according to European labeling. Methods: A systematic review of ESA studies with starting doses according to European labeling was conducted according to published methodology. Measures of dose efficiency were defined as mean weekly doses to achieve target hemoglobin level or final dose and dose adjustments (dose increase, decrease, or withheld). Electronic databases and grey literature sources were searched up to July 2012. Data were selected for analysis using an evidence hierarchy and quantitatively analyzed to assess statistical homogeneity. Where pooling of data was not appropriate, a narrative summary with descriptive statistics (medians and ranges) was reported. Results: Fifty-five studies met the inclusion criteria. Twenty-five studies considered to represent the highest level of evidence were extracted and included in the analysis. The analysis showed a high degree of statistical heterogeneity, often precluding metaanalysis. The patients included in the analysis were representative of those encountered in clinical practice, and patient characteristics were similar between the short-acting and the darbepoetin alfa groups. Mean weekly doses appeared similar to 30% lower with darbepoetin alfa versus short-acting ESAs (median, 136.5 mu g or 27,300 RI [range, 21,560-38,260 IU] vs 38,230 IU [range, 31,634-42,714 RI], respectively), resulting in a mean weekly dose ratio of 1:280. Darbepoetin alfa patients appeared to need fewer dose increases compared with short-acting ESAs (pooled, 0.75%; I-2 = 21% vs median 26.6% [range, 7.6%-44.6%]) and more dose decreases (median, 74% [range, 57%-75%] vs 22% [range, 2.8%- 59%]). A similar percentage of darbepoetin alfa and short-acting ESA patients required a dose to be withheld (20% and 33% [2 studies] vs median 33.2% [range, 12.6%-51.1%]). Conclusions: Statistical heterogeneity between studies was high, although clinically the studies represented medical practice. Without randomized clinical trials directly comparing darbepoetin alfa and short-acting ESAs, these findings are tentative and future research is warranted. This review shows that good-quality, reliable data from head-to-head trials are lacking. The best available evidence comes from prospective ESA-arm data. Mean weekly doses, dose increases, and dose decreases suggest a dose efficiency for darbepoetin alfa compared with short-acting ESAs.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Clinical Therapeutics
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    ABSTRACT: Third-generation aromatase inhibitors (letrozole, anastrozole) have shown superior efficacy in early and advanced breast cancer compared with tamoxifen. For HR+, HER2+ MBC, combination of an AI with an anti-HER2 agent (lapatinib or trastuzumab) has shown clinical benefit. Six databases were searched until January 2009 for randomized controlled clinical trials, assessing the safety and efficacy of first-line treatments for postmenopausal women with HR+ and HER2 (ErbB2) positive MBC, who have not received prior therapy for advanced or metastatic disease. Relevant interventions were lapatinib, aromatase inhibitors, tamoxifen, and trastuzumab. Outcomes included overall survival (OS), progression-free-survival (PFS), time-to-progression (TTP), and objective response rate (ORR). Eighteen studies (62 papers) were included. Lapatinib + letrozole was significantly superior to letrozole alone based on a direct head-to-head study in terms of PFS/TTP and ORR. Using a network meta-analysis, compared with lapatinib + letrozole, tamoxifen (HR = 0.45 (95% CI: 0.32, 0.65) and anastrozole (HR = 0.53 (0.36, 0.80)) scored significantly worse in terms of PFS/TTP and ORR (tamoxifen: OR = 0.25 (0.12, 0.53), anastrozole: OR = 0.27 (0.12, 0.58). The combination also seemed significantly superior to exemestane in terms of PFS/TTP (HR = 0.52 (0.34, 0.79)). Lapatinib + letrozole also seemed better, although not significantly, in terms of OS versus tamoxifen: HR = 0.74 (0.49, 1.12), anastrozole: HR = 0.71 (0.45, 1.14) and exemestane: HR = 0.65 (0.39, 1.11). When compared with trastuzumab + anastrozole, lapatinib + letrozole seemed to be better in terms of OS (HR = 0.85 (0.47, 1.54)), PFS/TTP (HR = 0.89 (0.54, 1.47)) and ORR (OR = 0.92 (0.24, 3.48)), although, none of these results were significant. Lapatinib + letrozole was significantly superior to letrozole in terms of PFS/TTP and ORR based on a direct head-to-head study. Indirect comparisons appeared to favor lapatinib + letrozole versus other first-line treatments used in this patient population in terms of three main outcomes: OS, PFS/TTP and ORR. Indirect comparison results are based on a network analysis for which the basic assumptions of homogeneity, similarity and consistency were not fulfilled. Therefore, despite the fact that these are the best available data, the results need to be interpreted with caution.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2012 · Current Medical Research and Opinion
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    Preview · Article · Nov 2011 · Value in Health
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    ABSTRACT: A systematic review of chronic pain treatment with strong opioids (step 3 WHO pain ladder) and a comparison to a new drug recently approved for the treatment of severe chronic pain in Europe, tapentadol (Palexia, Nucynta*), were performed. Thirteen electronic databases were searched as well as a number of other sources from 1980 up to November 2010 for relevant randomized controlled clinical trials in chronic moderate and severe pain investigating at least one step 3 opioid. Chronic pain could be nociceptive or neuropathic, malignant or non-malignant, all systemic administrations were considered as well as trials of different lengths. Two separate analyses were performed, one only for trials which reported (at least as sub-groups) the outcome in patients with severe pain, the other including both moderate and severe pain conditions. With the exception of the direct comparison between tapentadol, oxycodone and placebo, indirect comparisons were performed based on a network analysis. Trials with an enriched or an enriched withdrawal design were excluded. Primary (pain intensity) and a number of secondary endpoints were evaluated, including pain relief (30% and 50%), patient global impression of change, quality of life, quality of sleep, discontinuations, as well as serious adverse events and selected adverse events. Only 10 trials were eligible for analysis of patients with severe pain (eight investigating tapentadol and two trials comparing buprenorphine patch vs placebo). For moderate and severe pain, 42 relevant trials were identified and indirect comparisons with transdermal buprenorphine, transdermal fentanyl, hydromorphone, morphine, and oxymorphone were performed. This report focuses on the network analysis. Tapentadol showed statistically favourable results over oxycodone for pain intensity, 30% and 50% pain relief, patient global impression of change (PGIC), and quality of life. Furthermore, some of the most important adverse events of chronic opioid treatment were significantly less frequent with tapentadol as compared to oxycodone, i.e. constipation, nausea, and vomiting; discontinuations due to these adverse events were found significantly reduced with tapentadol. Similar results were obtained for the network analysis, i.e. tapentadol was superior for the primary outcome (pain intensity) to hydromorphone and morphine, whereas fentanyl and oxymorphone showed trends in favour of these treatments. Significantly less frequent gastrointestinal adverse events of tapentadol were observed in comparison with fentanyl, hydromorphone, morphine, and oxymorphone, apparently leading to significantly reduced treatment discontinuations (for any reason). Taken together, the benefit-risk ratio of tapentadol appears to be improved compared to step 3 opioids.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2011 · Current Medical Research and Opinion
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    ABSTRACT: World-wide, cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Increasing the uptake of screening, alongside increasing informed choice is of great importance in controlling this disease through prevention and early detection. To assess the effectiveness of interventions aimed at women, to increase the uptake, including informed uptake, of cervical cancer screening. We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Issue 1, 2009. MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS databases up to March 2009. We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings, reference lists of included studies and contacted experts in the field. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions to increase uptake/informed uptake of cervical cancer screening. Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risk of bias. Where possible the data were synthesised in a meta-analysis. Thirty-eight trials met our inclusion criteria. These trials assessed the effectiveness of invitational and educational interventions, counselling, risk factor assessment and procedural interventions. Heterogeneity between trials limited statistical pooling of data. Overall, however, invitations appear to be effective methods of increasing uptake. In addition, there is limited evidence to support the use of educational materials. Secondary outcomes including cost data were incompletely documented so evidence was limited. Most trials were at moderate risk of bias. Informed uptake of cervical screening was not reported in any trials. There is evidence to support the use of invitation letters to increase the uptake of cervical screening. There is limited evidence to support educational interventions but it is unclear what format is most effective. The majority of the studies are from developed countries and so the relevance to developing countries is unclear.
    Full-text · Article · May 2011 · Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online)
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    Preview · Article · Nov 2010 · Value in Health
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    ABSTRACT: To undertake a systematic review of three first-line treatments (letrozole, anastrozole and exemestane) for hormone sensitive advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) in post-menopausal women. We searched six databases from inception up to January 2009 for relevant trials regardless of language or publication status. Randomised controlled clinical trials assessing the safety and efficacy of first-line AIs for post-menopausal women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+, i.e. ER+ and/or PgR+) with or without ErbB2 (HER2)-positive MBC, who have not received prior therapy for advanced or metastatic disease were included. Where meta-analysis using direct or indirect comparisons was considered unsuitable for some or all of the data, we employed a narrative synthesis method. Four studies (25 papers) met the inclusion criteria. From the available evidence, it was possible to directly compare the three AIs with tamoxifen. In addition, by using a network meta-analysis it was possible to compare the three AIs with each other. Based on direct evidence, letrozole seemed to be significantly better than tamoxifen in terms of time-to-progression (TTP) (HR = 0.70 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.82)), objective response rate (RR = 0.65 (95% CI: 0.52, 0.82)) and quality-adjusted time without symptoms or toxicity (Q-Twist difference = 1.5; P < 0.001). Exemestane seemed significantly superior to tamoxifen in terms of objective response rate (RR = 0.68 (95% CI: 0.53, 0.89)). Anastrozole seemed significantly superior to tamoxifen in terms of TTP in one trial (HR = 1.42 (95% CI: 1.15, NR)), but not in the other (HR = 1.01 (95% CI: 0.87, NR)). In terms of adverse events, no significant differences were found between letrozole and tamoxifen. Tamoxifen was associated with significantly more serious adverse events in comparison with exemestane (OR = 0.61 (95% CI: 0.38, 0.97)); while exemestane was associated with significantly more arthralgia in comparison with tamoxifen (OR = 2.33 (95% CI: 1.07, 5.11)). Anastrozole was associated with significantly more total adverse events (OR = 1.04 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.09)) and hot flushes (OR = 1.39 (95% CI: 1.03, 1.89)) in comparison with tamoxifen in one trial; however, the other trial showed no significant differences in adverse events between anastrozole and tamoxifen. The indirect comparison of AIs with each other in women with post-menopausal, hormone sensitive advanced or MBC showed that letrozole and exemestane were better in terms of objective response rate than anastrozole; while the more clinically relevant outcomes overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) showed no significant differences between AIs. OS and PFS showed no significant differences between AIs and hence based on these results a class effect for all AIs is possible. However, these results are based on indirect comparisons and a network analysis for which the basic assumptions of homogeneity, similarity and consistency were not fulfilled. Therefore, despite the fact that these are the best available data, the results need to be interpreted with appropriate caution. Head-to-head comparisons between letrozole, anastrozole and exemestane in the first-line MBC setting are warranted.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2010 · Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

  • No preview · Article · Mar 2010 · EJC Supplements
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the potential cost-effectiveness of alternative 'test-and-treat' strategies in the prevention of spontaneous pre-term birth before 34 and 37 weeks' gestation. Model-based economic evaluation. Setting. Clinics, general practices, health centers or any setting delivering antenatal care. Asymptomatic women in early pregnancy and symptomatic women with threatened pre-term labor in later pregnancy. Data from systematic reviews of effectiveness and accuracy were combined into strategies and analyzed using a decision-tree model. Full deterministic and probabilistic sensitivity analyses were carried out. Spontaneous pre-term labor avoided for asymptomatic women and spontaneous pre-term birth avoided for symptomatic women. The systematic reviews identified evidence on the accuracy of 22 types of tests and on the effectiveness of 40 possible interventions. Cost data were based on secondary evidence, supplemented with primary data from local sources. Testing prior to intervention was not shown to be the most cost-effective strategy in the main analyses for 34 and 37 weeks. Prophylactic fish oil in asymptomatic women, without prior testing, was highlighted as potentially cost-effective in preventing threatened pre-term labor before 34 weeks. In symptomatic women with a viable pregnancy, indomethacin without prior testing was a potentially cost-effective strategy to prevent pre-term birth occurring before 37 weeks. An effective, affordable and safe intervention applied to all mothers without prior testing is likely to be the most cost-effective strategy in the prevention of spontaneous pre-term labor and birth. The results reported in this paper are important for prioritizing future research, world-wide.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2009 · Acta Obstetricia Et Gynecologica Scandinavica
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    ABSTRACT: To identify combinations of tests and treatments to predict and prevent spontaneous preterm birth. Searches were run on the following databases up to September 2005 inclusive: MEDLINE, EMBASE, DARE, the Cochrane Library (CENTRAL and Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register) and MEDION. We also contacted experts including the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group and checked reference lists of review articles and papers that were eligible for inclusion. Two series of systematic reviews were performed: (1) accuracy of tests for the prediction of spontaneous preterm birth in asymptomatic women in early pregnancy and in women symptomatic with threatened preterm labour in later pregnancy; (2) effectiveness of interventions with potential to reduce cases of spontaneous preterm birth in asymptomatic women in early pregnancy and to reduce spontaneous preterm birth or improve neonatal outcome in women with a viable pregnancy symptomatic of threatened preterm labour. For the health economic evaluation, a model-based analysis incorporated the combined effect of tests and treatments and their cost-effectiveness. Of the 22 tests reviewed for accuracy, the quality of studies and accuracy of tests was generally poor. Only a few tests had LR+ > 5. In asymptomatic women these were ultrasonographic cervical length measurement and cervicovaginal prolactin and fetal fibronectin screening for predicting spontaneous preterm birth before 34 weeks. In this group, tests with LR- < 0.2 were detection of uterine contraction by home uterine monitoring and amniotic fluid C-reactive protein (CRP) measurement. In symptomatic women with threatened preterm labour, tests with LR+ > 5 were absence of fetal breathing movements, cervical length and funnelling, amniotic fluid interleukin-6 (IL-6), serum CRP for predicting birth within 2-7 days of testing, and matrix metalloprotease-9, amniotic fluid IL-6, cervicovaginal fetal fibronectin and cervicovaginal human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) for predicting birth before 34 or 37 weeks. In this group, tests with LR- < 0.2 included measurement of cervicovaginal IL-8, cervicovaginal hCG, cervical length measurement, absence of fetal breathing movement, amniotic fluid IL-6 and serum CRP, for predicting birth within 2-7 days of testing, and cervicovaginal fetal fibronectin and amniotic fluid IL-6 for predicting birth before 34 or 37 weeks. The overall quality of the trials included in the 40 interventional topics reviewed for effectiveness was also poor. Antibiotic treatment was generally not beneficial but when used to treat bacterial vaginosis in women with intermediate flora it significantly reduced the incidence of spontaneous preterm birth. Smoking cessation programmes, progesterone, periodontal therapy and fish oil appeared promising as preventative interventions in asymptomatic women. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents were the most effective tocolytic agent for reducing spontaneous preterm birth and prolonging pregnancy in symptomatic women. Antenatal corticosteroids had a beneficial effect on the incidence of respiratory distress syndrome and the risk of intraventricular haemorrhage (28-34 weeks), but the effects of repeat courses were unclear. For asymptomatic women, costs ranged from 1.08 pounds for vitamin C to 1219 pounds for cervical cerclage, whereas costs for symptomatic women were more significant and varied little, ranging from 1645 pounds for nitric oxide donors to 2555 pounds for terbutaline; this was because the cost of hospitalisation was included. The best estimate of additional average cost associated with a case of spontaneous preterm birth was approximately 15,688 pounds for up to 34 weeks and 12,104 pounds for up to 37 weeks. Among symptomatic women there was insufficient evidence to draw firm conclusions for preventing birth at 34 weeks. Hydration given to women testing positive for amniotic fluid IL-6 was the most cost-effective test-treatment combination. Indomethacin given to all women without any initial testing was the most cost-effective option for preventing birth before 37 weeks among symptomatic women. For a symptomatic woman, the most cost-effective test-treatment combination for postponing delivery by at least 48 h was the cervical length (15 mm) measurement test with treatment with indomethacin for all those testing positive. This combination was also the most cost-effective option for postponing delivery by at least 7 days. Antibiotic treatment for asymptomatic bacteriuria of all women without any initial testing was the most cost-effective option for preventing birth before 37 weeks among asymptomatic women but this does not take into account the potential side effects of antibiotics or issues such as increased resistance. For primary prevention, an effective, affordable and safe intervention applied to all mothers without preceding testing is likely to be the most cost-effective approach in asymptomatic women in early pregnancy. For secondary prevention among women at risk of preterm labour in later pregnancy, a management strategy based on the results of testing is likely to be more cost-effective. Implementation of a treat-all strategy with simple interventions, such as fish oils, would be premature for asymptomatic women. Universal provision of high-quality ultrasound machines in labour wards is more strongly indicated for predicting spontaneous preterm birth among symptomatic women than direct management, although staffing issues and the feasibility and acceptability to mothers and health providers of such strategies need to be explored. Further research should include investigations of low-cost and effective tests and treatments to reduce and delay spontaneous preterm birth and reduce the risk of perinatal mortality arising from preterm birth.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2009
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    S Hempel · D Chambers · A-M Bagnall · C Forbes
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    ABSTRACT: The aetiology of chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis (CFS/ME) is still unknown. The identification of risk factors for CFS/ME is of great importance to practitioners. A systematic scoping review was conducted to locate studies that analysed risk factors for CFS/ME using multiple predictors. We searched for published and unpublished literature in 11 electronic databases, reference lists of retrieved articles and guideline stakeholder submissions in conjunction with the development of a forthcoming national UK guideline. Risk factors and findings were extracted in a concise tabular overview and studies synthesized narratively. Eleven studies were identified that met inclusion criteria: two case-control studies, four cohort studies, three studies combining a cohort with a case-control study design, one case-control and twin study and one cross-sectional survey. The studies looked at a variety of demographic, medical, psychological, social and environmental factors to predict the development of CFS/ME. The existing body of evidence is characterized by factors that were analysed in several studies but without replication of a significant association in more than two studies, and by studies demonstrating significant associations of specific factors that were not assessed in other studies. None of the identified factors appear suitable for the timely identification of patients at risk of developing CFS/ME within clinical practice. Various potential risk factors for the development of CFS/ME have been assessed but definitive evidence that appears meaningful for clinicians is lacking.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2008 · Psychological Medicine
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    A-M Bagnall · S. Hempel · D. Chambers · V. Orton · C Forbes

    Full-text · Article · Jan 2007
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    ABSTRACT: To review the effectiveness and/or accuracy, cost-effectiveness, and predictive value of neuroimaging of the cerebral cortex to visualise the seizure focus in people with refractory epilepsy being considered for surgery. Electronic databases, Internet searches, hand searching and consultation with experts. A systematic review was undertaken according to published guidelines. Results of diagnostic accuracy studies were analysed according to the imaging test evaluated. For each study the proportion of patients who were correctly localised, not localised, partially localised or incorrectly localised by the index test was calculated. Due to the heterogeneity present between studies, statistical pooling was not performed. Instead, a narrative synthesis of results is presented. For studies using multivariate analysis to look at the association of neuroimaging findings and outcome following surgery, all factors considered in the analyses were presented. Studies were grouped according to the neuroimaging technique investigated and the findings discussed with reference to possible sources of heterogeneity between studies. No randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were identified, with the majority of studies evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of various imaging techniques in the localisation of epileptic seizure foci. There was significant heterogeneity (p<0.05) between studies for at least one of the localisation categories (correctly localised, not localised, partially localised and incorrectly localised) for all imaging techniques. Possible explanations for this heterogeneity include differing study designs, index test characteristics, reference standards and population characteristics. Test performance was more promising in studies restricted to patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Ictal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) generally had more correctly localising (70--100%) and fewer non-localising (0--7%) scans than other techniques evaluated in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Results for computed tomography and interictal SPECT suggest that these tests are relatively poor at localising the seizure focus. Volumeric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and position emission tomography (PET) appear promising, and subtraction ictal single photon emission computed tomography co-registered to magnetic resonance imaging (SISCOM) and magnetic resonance spectrosopy (MRS) less promising than ictal SPECT, but these technologies have been assessed in fewer studies. T2 relaxometry was reported in only one small study with inconclusive results. Seventeen studies (33 evaluations) provided sufficient data on the association of a localised scan with outcome following surgery to calculate a relative risk. The majority of evaluations (24/33) suggested that patients with a correctly or partially localised scan had a better outcome following surgery than those with an incorrectly localised or non-localised scan. However, this association was statistically significant in only three studies, two evaluating routine MRI [(relative risk (RR) 2.74, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32 to 5.67; RR 1.28, 95% CI: 1.00 to 1.63] and the other SISCOM (RR 2.12, 95% CI: 1.01, 4.44). Nine studies used multivariate analysis to investigate the association of MRI (7 studies), MRS and volumetric MRI (1 study), PET (3 studies), SPECT (1 study) and SISCOM (3 studies) with the outcome following surgery. There was a trend for localisation of abnormalities to be associated with a beneficial outcome. Due to the limitations of the included studies, the results of this review do little to inform clinical practice, with insufficient evidence regarding effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of imaging techniques in the work-up for epilepsy surgery. Given the inadequacy of existing data, there is a pressing need for studies investigating the utility of imaging techniques in the work up for epilepsy surgery. The most reliable method to achieve this is the RCT, which could examine the single tests or combinations of tests on patient outcome. The authors suggest that it is important that clinicians, patient groups, policy makers and healthcare/research funders meet and debate the most appropriate way to investigate these technologies.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2006 · Health technology assessment (Winchester, England)
  • N Woolacott · L. Orton · S Beynon · L Myers · C Forbes

    No preview · Article · Jan 2006
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this review was to examine the clinical effectiveness, tolerability and cost-effectiveness of newer drugs for epilepsy in adults. For the purposes of this review newer antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) included gabapentin (GBP) (Neurontin(R), Parke-Davis), lamotrigine (LTG) (Lamictal(R), GlaxoSmithKline), levetiracetam (LEV) (Keppra(R), UCB Pharma), oxcarbazepine (OXC) (Trileptal(R), Novartis Pharmaceuticals), tiagabine (TGB) [Gabatril(R), Cephalon (UK)], topiramate (TPM) (Topomax(R), Janssen-Cilag) and vigabatrin (VGB) (Sabril(R), Hoechst Marion Roussel). A concurrent review was performed by the West Midlands Health Technology Assessment Collaboration (WMHTAC), Birmingham, to examine the clinical effectiveness, tolerability and cost-effectiveness of newer drugs for epilepsy in children.
    Full-text · Article · May 2005 · Health technology assessment (Winchester, England)
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    Full-text · Article · Feb 2002 · Health technology assessment (Winchester, England)
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    Carol A Forbes · Ruth G Jepson · Pierre PL Martin-Hirsch
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    ABSTRACT: Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer world-wide. Increasing the uptake of screening, alongside increasing informed choice is of great importance in controlling this disease through prevention and early detection. To assess the effectiveness of interventions aimed at increasing uptake, and informed uptake of cervical cancer screening. Twenty-three electronic databases (to March 2000) were searched with no language restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), or quasi-RCTs of interventions to increase uptake/informed uptake of cervical cancer screening. Data on study characteristics and quality were extracted independently by two reviewers. Where data were available, relative risks and 95% CI were calculated and a chi-squared test for heterogeneity was performed. Thirty-five studies were included (27 RCTs and eight quasi-RCTs). Heterogeneity between studies limited statistical pooling of data. Overall, however, invitations appear to be effective methods of increasing uptake. In addition, there is limited evidence to support the use of educational materials. The number and quality of included studies limited evidence regarding effectiveness of other interventions. Informed uptake of cervical screening was not considered by any studies. There was some evidence to support the use of invitation letters to increase the uptake of cervical screening. There was limited evidence to support educational interventions but it was unclear what format was most effective. The majority of the studies were from developed countries and so the relevance to developing countries is unclear.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2002 · Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online)
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    Full-text · Article · Feb 2002 · Health technology assessment (Winchester, England)
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    Full-text · Article · Feb 2002 · Health technology assessment (Winchester, England)
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    Full-text · Article · Feb 2002 · Health technology assessment (Winchester, England)

Publication Stats

955 Citations
100.41 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2010-2014
    • Kleijnen Systematic Reviews Ltd
      York, England, United Kingdom
  • 2001-2011
    • The University of York
      • Centre for Reviews and Dissemination
      York, England, United Kingdom
    • CUNY Graduate Center
      New York, New York, United States
  • 2009
    • University of Birmingham
      Birmingham, England, United Kingdom