Bianca M. Poggianti

The University of Tokyo, 白山, Tōkyō, Japan

Are you Bianca M. Poggianti?

Claim your profile

Publications (181)567.21 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The star formation quenching depends on environment, but a full understanding of what mechanisms drive it is still missing. Exploiting a sample of galaxies with masses $M_\ast>10^{9.8}M_\odot$, drawn from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) and its recent extension OMEGAWINGS, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) as a function of stellar mass (M$_*$) in galaxy clusters at $0.04<z<0.07$. We use non-member galaxies at 0.02$<$z$<$0.09 as field control sample. Overall, we find agreement between the SFR-M$_*$ relation in the two environments, but detect a population of cluster galaxies with reduced SFRs which is rare in the field. These {\it transition} galaxies are mainly found within the cluster virial radius ($R_{200}$) but they impact on the SFR-M$_*$ relation only within 0.6R$_{200}$. The ratio of transition to PSF galaxies strongly depends on environment, being larger than 0.6 within 0.3R$_{200}$ and rapidly decreasing with distance, while it is almost flat with $M_*$. As galaxies move downward from the SFR-M$_*$ main sequence, they become redder and present older luminosity and mass weighted ages. These trends, together with the analysis of the star formation histories, suggest that transition galaxies have had a reduced SFR for the past 2-5 Gyr. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the interaction of galaxies with the intracluster medium via strangulation causes a gradual shut down of star formation, giving birth to an evolved population of galaxies in transition from being star forming to becoming passive.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present the first study of the spatial distribution of star formation in z~0.5 cluster galaxies. The analysis is based on data taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 as part of the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). We illustrate the methodology by focusing on two clusters (MACS0717.5+3745 and MACS1423.8+2404) with different morphologies (one relaxed and one merging) and use foreground and background galaxies as field control sample. The cluster+field sample consists of 42 galaxies with stellar masses in the range 10^8-10^11 M_sun, and star formation rates in the range 1-20 M_sun/yr. Both in clusters and in the field, H{\alpha} is more extended than the rest-frame UV continuum in 60% of the cases, consistent with diffuse star formation and inside out growth. In ~20% of the cases, the H{\alpha} emission appears more extended in cluster galaxies than in the field, pointing perhaps to ionized gas being stripped and/or star formation being enhanced at large radii. The peak of the H{\alpha} emission and that of the continuum are offset by less than 1 kpc. We investigate trends with the hot gas density as traced by the X-ray emission, and with the surface mass density as inferred from gravitational lens models and find no conclusive results. The diversity of morphologies and sizes observed in H_alpha illustrates the complexity of the environmental process that regulate star formation. Upcoming analysis of the full GLASS dataset will increase our sample size by almost an order of magnitude, verifying and strengthening the inference from this initial dataset.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: An understanding of the mass build-up in galaxies over time necessitates tracing the evolution of cold gas (molecular and atomic) in galaxies. To that end, we have conducted a pilot study called CO Observations with the LMT of the Blind Ultra-Deep H I Environment Survey (COOL BUDHIES). We have observed 23 galaxies in and around the two clusters Abell 2192 (z = 0.188) and Abell 963 (z = 0.206), where 12 are cluster members and 11 are slightly in the foreground or background, using about 28 total hours on the Redshift Search Receiver (RSR) on the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT) to measure the $^{12}$CO J = 1 --> 0 emission line and obtain molecular gas masses. These new observations provide a unique opportunity to probe both the molecular and atomic components of galaxies as a function of environment beyond the local Universe. For our sample of 23 galaxies, nine have reliable detections (S/N$\geq$3.6) of the $^{12}$CO line, and another six have marginal detections (2.0 < S/N < 3.6). For the remaining eight targets we can place upper limits on molecular gas masses roughly between $10^9$ and $10^{10} M_\odot$. Comparing our results to other studies of molecular gas, we find that our sample is significantly more abundant in molecular gas overall, when compared to the stellar and the atomic gas component, and our median molecular gas fraction lies about $1\sigma$ above the upper limits of proposed redshift evolution in earlier studies. We discuss possible reasons for this discrepancy, with the most likely conclusion being target selection and Eddington bias.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present the first results obtained by analyzing the detailed kinematics of a subsample of 9 massive and compact galaxies found in the WINGS survey. The observed galaxies are very old (both luminosity and mass- weighted age are on average ≥ 10 Gyr), while they resemble more typical galaxies in the other characteristics. The total M/L ratio is determined using as free parameters the anisotropy β and the galaxy inclination i.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present results from a low-resolution spectroscopic survey for 21 galaxy clusters at 0.4<z<0.8 selected from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS). We measured spectra using the Low-Dispersion Prism (LDP) in IMACS on the Magellan Baade telescope and calculate redshifts with a precision of $\sigma_z=0.006$. We find 1,602 galaxies that are brighter than R=22.6 in the large-scale cluster environs. We identify the galaxies expected to be accreted by the clusters as they evolve to z=0 using spherical infall models, and find that ~30-70% of the z=0 cluster population lies outside the virial radius at z~0.6. For analogous clusters at z=0, we calculate that the ratio of galaxies that have fallen into the clusters since z~0.6 to that which were already in the core at that redshift is typically between ~0.3 and 1.5. This wide range of ratios is due to intrinsic scatter and is not a function of velocity dispersion, so a variety of infall histories is to be expected for clusters with current velocity dispersions of $300~<\sigma<~1200$ km/s. Within the infall regions of z~0.6 clusters, we find a larger red fraction of galaxies than in the field and greater clustering among red galaxies than blue. We interpret these findings as evidence of "preprocessing", where galaxies in denser local environments have their star formation rates affected prior to their aggregation into massive clusters, although the possibility of backsplash galaxies complicates the interpretation.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Using V band photometry of the WINGS survey, we derive galaxy luminosity functions (LF) in nearby clusters. This sample is complete down to Mv=-15.15, and it is homogeneous, thus allowing the study of an unbiased sample of clusters with different characteristics. We constructed the photometric LF for 72 out of the original 76 WINGS clusters, excluding only those without a velocity dispersion estimate. For each cluster we obtained the LF for galaxies in a region of radius=0.5 x r200, and fitted them with single and double Schechter's functions. We also derive the composite LF for the entire sample, and those pertaining to different morphological classes. Finally we derive the spectroscopic cumulative LF for 2009 galaxies that are cluster members. The double Schechter fit parameters are neither correlated with the cluster velocity dispersion, nor with the X-ray luminosity. Our median values of the Schechter's fit slope are, on average, in agreement with measurements of nearby clusters, but are less steep that those derived from large surveys, such as the SDSS. Early--type galaxies outnumber late-types at all magnitudes, but both early and late types contribute equally to the faint end of the LF. Finally, the spectroscopic LF is in excellent agreement with the ones derived for A2199, A85 and Virgo, and with the photometric one at the bright magnitudes (where both are available). There is a large spread in the LF of different clusters. However, this spread is not caused by correlation of the LF shape with cluster characteristics such as X--ray luminosity or velocity dispersions. The faint end is flatter than what previously derived (alpha_f=-1.7) at odds with what predicted from numerical simulations.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Jellyfish galaxies are galaxies that exhibit tentacles of debris material suggestive of gas stripping. We have conducted the first systematic search for jellyfish galaxies at low-z (z=0.04-0.07) in different environments. We have visually inspected B and V-band images and identified 241+153 candidates in 41+31 galaxy clusters of the OMEGAWINGS+WINGS sample and 99 candidates in groups and lower mass structures in the PM2GC sample. This large sample is well suited for follow-up studies of the gas and for a detailed analysis of the environments where such episodes of gas stripping occur. We present here the atlas of jellyfish candidates, a first analysis of their environment and their basic properties, such as morphologies, star formation rates and galaxy stellar masses. Jellyfish candidates are found in all clusters and at all clustercentric radii, and their number does not correlate with the cluster velocity dispersion or X-ray luminosity. Interestingly, convincing cases of jellyfish candidates are also found in groups and lower mass haloes (10^{11}-10^{14} M_sun). All the candidates are disky, have stellar masses ranging from log M/M_sun < 9 to > 11.5 and the majority of them form stars, at a rate that is on average a factor of 2 higher compared to non-stripped galaxies of similar mass. The few post-starburst and passive candidates have weak tentacles. We conclude that the jellyfish phenomenon is ubiquitous in clusters and can be present even in groups and low mass haloes. Further studies will reveal the physics of the gas stripping and clarify the mechanisms at work.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2015
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We analyse the star formation history (SFH) of galaxies as a function of present-day environment, galaxy stellar mass and morphology. The SFH is derived by means of a non-parametric spectrophotometric model applied to individual galaxies at z ∼ 0.04–0.1 in the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) clusters and the Padova Millennium Galaxy and Group Catalogue (PM2GC) field. The field reconstructed evolution of the star formation rate density (SFRD) follows the values observed at each redshift, except at z > 2, where our estimate is ∼1.7 × higher than the high-z observed value. The slope of the SFRD decline with time gets progressively steeper going from low-mass to high-mass haloes. The decrease of the SFRD since z = 2 is due to (1) quenching – 50 per cent of the SFRD in the field and 75 per cent in clusters at z > 2 originated in galaxies that are passive today – and (2) the fact that the average SFR of today's star-forming galaxies has decreased with time. We quantify the contribution to the SFRD(z) of galaxies of today's different masses and morphologies. The current morphology correlates with the current star formation activity but is irrelevant for the past stellar history. The average SFH depends on galaxy mass, but galaxies of a given mass have different histories depending on their environment. We conclude that the variation of the SFRD(z) with environment is not driven by different distributions of galaxy masses and morphologies in clusters and field, and must be due to an accelerated formation in high-mass haloes compared to low-mass ones even for galaxies that will end up having the same galaxy mass today.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In order to assess whether the environment has a significant effect on galaxy sizes, we compare the mass–size relations of cluster and field galaxies in the 0.4 < z < 0.8 redshift range from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS) using Hubble Space Telescope images. We analyse two mass-selected samples, one defined using photometric redshifts (10.2 ≤ log M*/M⊙ ≤ 12.0), and a smaller more robust subsample using spectroscopic redshifts (10.6 ≤ log M*/M⊙ ≤ 11.8). We find no significant difference in the size distributions of cluster and field galaxies of a given morphology. Similarly, we find no significant difference in the size distributions of cluster and field galaxies of similar rest-frame B − V colours. We rule out average size differences larger than 10–20 per cent in both cases. Consistent conclusions are found with the spectroscopic and photometric samples. These results have important consequences for the physical process(es) responsible for the size evolution of galaxies, and in particular the effect of the environment. The remarkable growth in galaxy size observed from z ∼ 2.5 has been reported to depend on the environment at higher redshifts (z > 1), with early-type/passive galaxies in higher density environments growing earlier. Such dependence disappears at lower redshifts. Therefore, if the reported difference at higher-z is real, the growth of field galaxies has caught up with that of cluster galaxies by z ∼ 1. Any putative mechanism responsible for galaxy growth has to account for the existence of environmental differences at high redshift and their absence (or weakening) at lower redshifts.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present the morphology–density and morphology–radius relations (T–Σ and T–R, respectively) obtained from the WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) data base of galaxies in nearby clusters. Aiming to achieve the best statistics, we exploit the whole sample of galaxies brighter than MV = −19.5 (5504 objects), stacking up the 76 clusters of the WINGS survey altogether. Using this global cluster sample, we find that the T–Σ relation holds only in the inner cluster regions (R < 1/3 R200), while the T–R relation keeps almost unchanged over the whole range of local density. A couple of tests and two sets of numerical simulations support the robustness of these results against the effects of the limited cluster area coverage of the WINGS imaging. The above mentioned results hold for all cluster masses (X-ray luminosity and velocity dispersion) and all galaxy stellar masses (M*). The strength of the T–Σ relation (where present) increases with increasing M*, while this effect is not found for the T–R relation. Noticeably, the absence/presence of subclustering determines the presence/absence of the T–Σ relation outside the inner cluster regions, leading us to the general conclusion that the link between morphology and local density is preserved just in dynamically evolved regions. We hypothesize that some mechanism of morphological broadening/redistribution operates in the intermediate/outer regions of substructured (‘non-relaxed’) clusters, producing a strong weakening of the T–Σ relation.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The cores of clusters at 0 $\lesssim$ z $\lesssim$ 1 are dominated by quiescent early-type galaxies, whereas the field is dominated by star-forming late-type ones. Galaxy properties, notably the star formation (SF) ability, are altered as they fall into overdense regions. The critical issues to understand this evolution are how the truncation of SF is connected to the morphological transformation and the responsible physical mechanism. The GaLAxy Cluster Evolution Survey (GLACE) is conducting a study on the variation of galaxy properties (SF, AGN, morphology) as a function of environment in a representative sample of clusters. A deep survey of emission line galaxies (ELG) is being performed, mapping a set of optical lines ([OII], [OIII], H$\beta$ and H$\alpha$/[NII]) in several clusters at z $\sim$ 0.40, 0.63 and 0.86. Using the Tunable Filters (TF) of OSIRIS/GTC, GLACE applies the technique of TF tomography: for each line, a set of images at different wavelengths are taken through the TF, to cover a rest frame velocity range of several thousands km/s. The first GLACE results target the H$\alpha$/[NII] lines in the cluster ZwCl 0024.0+1652 at z = 0.395 covering $\sim$ 2 $\times$ r$_{vir}$. We discuss the techniques devised to process the TF tomography observations to generate the catalogue of H$\alpha$ emitters of 174 unique cluster sources down to a SFR below 1 M$_{\odot}$/yr. The AGN population is discriminated using different diagnostics and found to be $\sim$ 37% of the ELG population. The median SFR is 1.4 M$_{\odot}$/yr. We have studied the spatial distribution of ELG, confirming the existence of two components in the redshift space. Finally, we have exploited the outstanding spectral resolution of the TF to estimate the cluster mass from ELG dynamics, finding M$_{200}$ = 4.1 $\times$ 10$^{14}$ M$_{\odot} h^{-1}$, in agreement with previous weak-lensing estimates.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We investigate the effect of ram-pressure from the intracluster medium on the stripping of HI gas in galaxies in a massive, relaxed, X-ray bright, galaxy cluster at z=0.2 from the Blind Ultra Deep HI Environmental Survey (BUDHIES). We use cosmological simulations, and velocity vs. position phase-space diagrams to infer the orbital histories of the cluster galaxies. In particular, we embed a simple analytical description of ram-pressure stripping in the simulations to identify the regions in phase-space where galaxies are more likely to have been sufficiently stripped of their HI gas to fall below the detection limit of our survey. We find a striking agreement between the model predictions and the observed location of HI-detected and non-detected blue (late-type) galaxies in phase-space, strongly implying that ram-pressure plays a key role in the gas removal from galaxies, and that this can happen during their first infall into the cluster. However, we also find a significant number of gas-poor, red (early-type) galaxies in the infall region of the cluster that cannot easily be explained with our model of ram-pressure stripping alone. We discuss different possible additional mechanisms that could be at play, including the pre-processing of galaxies in their previous environment. Our results are strengthened by the distribution of galaxy colours (optical and UV) in phase-space, that suggests that after a (gas-rich) field galaxy falls into the cluster, it will lose its gas via ram-pressure stripping, and as it settles into the cluster, its star formation will decay until it is completely quenched. Finally, this work demonstrates the utility of phase-space diagrams to analyze the physical processes driving the evolution of cluster galaxies, in particular HI gas stripping.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We show that a model consisting of individual, log-normal star formation histories for a volume-limited sample of $z\approx0$ galaxies reproduces the evolution of the total and quiescent stellar mass functions at $z\lesssim2.5$ and stellar masses $M_*\geq10^{10}\,{\rm M_\odot}$. This model has previously been shown to reproduce the star formation rate/stellar mass relation (${\rm SFR}$--$M_*$) over the same interval, is fully consistent with the observed evolution of the cosmic ${\rm SFR}$ density at $z\leq8$, and entails no explicit "quenching" prescription. We interpret these results/features in the context of other models demonstrating a similar ability to reproduce the evolution of (1) the cosmic ${\rm SFR}$ density, (2) the total/quiescent stellar mass functions, and (3) the ${\rm SFR}$--$M_*$ relation, proposing that the key difference between modeling approaches is the extent to which they stress/address diversity in the (starforming) galaxy population. Finally, we suggest that observations revealing the timescale associated with dispersion in ${\rm SFR}(M_*)$ will help establish which models are the most relevant to galaxy evolution.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2014
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Exploiting a mass complete (M_*>10^(10.25)M_sun) sample at 0.03<z<0.11 drawn from the Padova Millennium Galaxy Group Catalog (PM2GC), we use the (U-B)_rf color and morphologies to characterize galaxies, in particular those that show signs of an ongoing or recent transformation of their star formation activity and/or morphology - green galaxies, red passive late types, and blue star-forming early types. Color fractions depend on mass and only for M_*<10^(10.7)M_sun on environment. The incidence of red galaxies increases with increasing mass, and, for M_*<10^(10.7)M_sun, decreases toward the group outskirts and in binary and single galaxies. The relative abundance of green and blue galaxies is independent of environment, and increases monotonically with galaxy mass. We also inspect galaxy structural parameters, star-formation properties, histories and ages and propose an evolutionary scenario for the different subpopulations. Color transformations are due to a reduction and suppression of SFR in both bulges and disks which does not noticeably affect galaxy structure. Morphological transitions are linked to an enhanced bulge-to-disk ratio due to the removal of the disk, not to an increase of the bulge. Our modeling suggests that green colors might be due to star formation histories declining with long timescales, as an alternative scenario to the classical "quenching" processes. Our results suggest that galaxy transformations in star formation activity and morphology depend neither on environment nor on being a satellite or the most massive galaxy of a halo. The only environmental dependence we find is the higher fast quenching efficiency in groups giving origin to post-starburst signatures.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2014 · The Astrophysical Journal
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Aims. We present the B, V, and K band surface photometry catalogs obtained by running the automatic software GASPHOT on galaxies from the WINGS cluster survey with isophotal areas larger than 200 pixels. The catalogs can be downloaded at the Centre de Donnees Astronomiques de Strasbourg. Methods. The luminosity growth curves of stars and galaxies in a given catalog relative to a given cluster image were obtained simultaneously by slicing the image with a fixed surface brightness step in several SExtractor runs. Then, using a single Sersic law convolved with a space-varying point spread function (PSF), GASPHOT performed a simultaneous chi(2) best-fit of the major- and minor-axis luminosity growth curves of galaxies. We outline the GASPHOT performances and compare our surface photometry with that obtained by SExtractor, GALFIT, and GIM2D. This analysis is aimed at providing statistical information about the accuracy that is generally achieved by the softwares for automatic surface photometry of galaxies. Results. The GASPHOT catalogs provide the parameters of the Sersic law that fit the luminosity profiles for each galaxy and for each photometric band. They are the sky coordinates of the galaxy center (RA, Dec), the total magnitude (m), the semi-major axis of the effective isophote (R-e), the Sersic index (n), the axis ratio (b/a), and a flag parameter (Q(FLAG)) that generally indicates the fit quality. The WINGS-GASPHOT database includes 41 463 galaxies in the B band, 42 275 in the V band, and 71 687 in the K band. The bright early-type galaxies have higher Sersic indices and larger effective radii, as well as redder colors in their center. In general, the effective radii increase systematically from the K to the V and B band. Conclusions. The GASPHOT photometry agrees well with the surface photometry obtained by GALFIT and GIM2D, and with the aperture photometry provided by SExtractor. In particular, the direct comparison of structural parameters derived by different softwares for common galaxies indicates that the systematic differences are small in general. The only significant deviations are most likely due to the peculiar (and very accurate) image processing adopted by WINGS for large galaxies. The main advantages of GASPHOT with respect to other tools are (i) the automatic finding of the local PSF; (ii) the short CPU execution time; and (iii) the remarkable stability against the choice of the initial-guess parameters. All these characteristics make GASPHOT an ideal tool for blind surface photometry of large galaxy samples in wide-field CCD mosaics.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present recent results from the Blind Ultra Deep HI Environmental Survey (BUDHIES), that has detected over 150 galaxies at z ∼ 0.2 with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). Our multi-wavelength study is the first where optical properties and HI content are combined at a redshift where evolutionary effects begin to show. Our goal is to study the link between the environment, HI content, morphology, stellar mass and star formation in galaxies at z ∼ 0.2, and the importance of different physical mechanisms in the transformation of galaxies.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We present a comparison between the observed galaxy stellar mass function and the one predicted from the De Lucia & Blaizot semi-analytic model applied to the Millennium Simulation, for cluster satellites and galaxies in the field (meant as a wide portion of the sky, including all environments), in the local universe (z ~ 0.06), and at intermediate redshift (z ~ 0.6), with the aim to shed light on the processes which regulate the mass distribution in different environments. While the mass functions in the field and in its finer environments (groups, binary, and single systems) are well matched in the local universe down to the completeness limit of the observational sample, the model overpredicts the number of low-mass galaxies in the field at z ~ 0.6 and in clusters at both redshifts. Above M * = 1010.25M ☉, it reproduces the observed similarity of the cluster and field mass functions but not the observed evolution. Our results point out two shortcomings of the model: an incorrect treatment of cluster-specific environmental effects and an overefficient galaxy formation at early times (as already found by, e.g., Weinmann et al.). Next, we consider only simulations. Also using the Guo et al. model, we find that the high-mass end of the mass functions depends on halo mass: only very massive halos host massive galaxies, with the result that their mass function is flatter. Above M * = 109.4M ☉, simulations show an evolution in the number of the most massive galaxies in all environments. Mass functions obtained from the two prescriptions are different, however, results are qualitatively similar, indicating that the adopted methods to model the evolution of central and satellite galaxies still have to be better implemented in semi-analytic models.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2014 · The Astrophysical Journal
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We analyse the extended, ionized-gas emission of 24 early-type galaxies (ETGs) at 0 < z < 1 from the ESO Distant Cluster Survey (EDisCS). We discuss different possible sources of ionization and favour star formation as the main cause of the observed emission. 10 galaxies have disturbed gas kinematics, while 14 have rotating gas discs. In addition, 15 galaxies are in the field, while 9 are in the infall regions of clusters. This implies that, if the gas has an internal origin, this is likely stripped as the galaxies get closer to the cluster centre. If the gas instead comes from an external source, then our results suggest that this is more likely acquired outside the cluster environment, where galaxy–galaxy interactions more commonly take place. We analyse the Tully–Fisher relation of the ETGs with gas discs, and compare them to EDisCS spirals. Taking a matched range of redshifts, MB < −20, and excluding galaxies with large velocity uncertainties, we find that, at fixed rotational velocity, ETGs are 1.7 mag fainter in MB than spirals. At fixed stellar mass, we also find that ETGs have systematically lower specific star formation rates than spirals. This study constitutes an important step forward towards the understanding of the evolution of the complex ISM in ETGs by significantly extending the look-back-time baseline explored so far.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Context. To effectively investigate galaxy formation and evolution, it is of paramount importance to exploit homogeneous data for large samples of galaxies in different environments. Aims. The WIde-field Nearby Galaxy-cluster Survey (WINGS) project aim is to evaluate physical properties of galaxies in a complete sample of low redshift clusters to be used as reference sample for evolutionary studies. The WINGS survey is still ongoing and the original dataset will be enlarged with new observations. This paper presents the entire collection of WINGS measurements obtained so far. Methods. We decided to make use of the Virtual Observatory (VO) tools to share the WINGS database (that will be updated regularly) with the community. In the database each object has one unique identification (WINGSID). Each subset of estimated properties is accessible using a cone search (including wide-field images). Results. We provide the scientific community with the entire set of wide-field images. Furthermore, the published database contains photometry of 759 024 objects and surface brightness analysis for 42 275 and 41 463 galaxies in the V and B band, respectively. The completeness depends on the image quality, and on the cluster redshift, reaching on average 90% at V less than or similar to 21.7. Near-infrared photometric catalogs for 26 (in K) and 19 (in J) clusters are part of the database and the number of sources is 962 344 in K and 628 813 in J. Here again the completeness depends on the data quality, but it is on average higher than 90% for J less than or similar to 20.5 and K less than or similar to 19.4. The IR subsample with a Sersic fit comprises 71 687 objects. A morphological classification is available for 39 923 galaxies. We publish spectroscopic data, including 6132 redshifts, 5299 star formation histories, and 4381 equivalent widths. Finally, a calculation of local density is presented and implemented in the VO catalogs for 66 164 galaxies. The latter is presented here for the first time.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The slope of the star formation rate/stellar mass relation (the SFR ``Main Sequence"; SFR--Mstel) is not quite unity: specific star formation rates (SFR/Mstel) are weakly-but-significantly anti-correlated with Mstel. Here we demonstrate that this trend may simply reflect the well-known increase in bulge mass-fractions -- portions of a galaxy not forming stars -- with Mstel. Using a large set of bulge/disk decompositions and SFR estimates derived from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we show that re-normalizing SFR by disk stellar mass (sSFRd = SFR/Mdisk) reduces the Mstel-dependence of SF efficiency by ~0.25 dex per dex, erasing it entirely in some subsamples. Quantitatively, we find log(sSFRd)--log(Mstel) to have a slope -0.20 < beta_disk < 0.00 +/- 0.02 (depending on SFR estimator and Main Sequence definition) for star-forming galaxies with Mstel > 10^10 Msun and bulge mass-fractions B/T < 0.7, generally consistent with a pure-disk control sample (beta_control = -0.05 +/- 0.04). That <SFR/Mdisk> is (largely) independent of host mass for star-forming disks bears strongly on scenarios of galaxy evolution derived from any SFR--Mstel relation, including: the principal manifestation of ``mass quenching" (bulge growth); the constancy of the shape of the star-forming stellar mass function (uniform dlog(Mstel)/dt, assuming disk-driven growth); and the degree to which dispersion in SFR(Mstel,t) encodes diversity in star formation histories. Our results emphasize the need to treat galaxies as composite systems -- not integrated masses -- in observational and theoretical work.
    Preview · Article · Feb 2014 · The Astrophysical Journal Letters

Publication Stats

5k Citations
567.21 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2015
    • The University of Tokyo
      白山, Tōkyō, Japan
  • 1999-2015
    • The Astronomical Observatory of Brera
      Merate, Lombardy, Italy
  • 2014
    • Carnegie Institution for Science
      • Department of Terrestrial Magnetism
      Washington, West Virginia, United States
  • 2011-2013
    • National Institute of Astrophysics
      Roma, Latium, Italy
  • 2010
    • Astronomical Observatory of Trieste
      Trst, Friuli Venezia Giulia, Italy
  • 2009
    • University of Washington Seattle
      • Department of Astronomy
      Seattle, Washington, United States
  • 2008-2009
    • University of Padova
      • Department of Physics and Astronomy "Galileo Galilei"
      Padua, Veneto, Italy
  • 2002
    • Pontifical Catholic University of Chile
      CiudadSantiago, Santiago Metropolitan, Chile
  • 1998
    • University of Cambridge
      • Institute of Astronomy
      Cambridge, England, United Kingdom