Publications (7)6.44 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this open, randomized, multicenter study is to investigate the benefits and economic efficiency of self-management of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation (SMAAF study) in comparison with a group of patients given conventional care by a general practitioner or specialist. Two thousand patients suitable for self-management will be assigned at random to either the self-management group or the control group. The numbers of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications requiring treatment during the 2-year follow-up period will be recorded as the primary end point. The secondary endpoint variables will be maintenance of the INR value in the individual target range, INR variance, the course of complications over time, and the cost efficiency of self-management compared with the routine procedures. The last of these parameters will include the diagnostic and/or therapeutic measures carried out, the duration of inpatient hospital treatment, and the social consequences (subsequent rehabilitation treatment, inability to work, forced rentirement). The estimate of the required number of patients was based on the assumption that during long-term anticoagulant therapy within the framework of primary and secondary prevention 4% of patients with chronic non-valvular atrial fibrillation would have severe thromboembolic of hemorrhagic complications each year. Since this rate can be halved by self-management, a one-tailed χ2-test of 80% power and a 5% significance threshold would require n = 997 patients per group. The results of the SMAAF study will establish the socioeconomic benefits of selfmanagement in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2012 · Zeitschrift für Kardiologie
  • H Völler · J Glatz · U Taborski · A Bernardo · C Dovifat · K Heidinger
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    ABSTRACT: Most patients with atrial fibrillation are at risk of suffering thromboembolic events. This risk can be reduced by twothirds by efficient anticoagulation. This prospective multi-center trial investigated whether the quality of treatment can be improved by self-management in patients with atrial fibrillations (SMAAF Study) compared to conventional patient management by the family doctor. Two thousand patients suitable for self-management were to be randomized into the two arms of the study. In the period of investigation from December 1999 to July 2001, only 202 patients (64.3+/-9.2 years, 69.3% men) consented to participate. The study was discontinued prematurely since the number of patients was too low. As a consequence, the group comparison is confined to the evaluation of the INR values measured using the two-tailed t test. Of the 202 patients included, 101 were assigned to the self-management group (64.6+/-9.6 years, 71.4% men) and 101 (64.1+/-8.9 years, 61.4% men, n.s.) were assigned to the group managed by the family doctor. The total number of INR measurements was 2 865. This comprised 2 072 measurements in patients under self-management and 793 in the family doctor group. The values were within the target range significantly more frequently (p=0.0061) in patients under self-management (67.8%) as compared to the family doctor group (58.5%). There was a trend with regard to the time within target range, but the difference was not significant (178.8+/-126 days as compared to 155.9+/-118.4 days). In the self-management group, there were two severe hemorrhages, and there was one thromboembolic event in the family doctor group. Management of oral anticoagulation by INR self-management in patients with atrial fibrillation is not inferior to conventional care.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2005 · Zeitschrift für Kardiologie
  • J. Glatz · U. Taborski · A. Bernardo · C. Dovifat · K. Heidinger

    No preview · Article · Jan 2005
  • A Bernardo · H Völler

    No preview · Article · Apr 2001 · DMW - Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift
  • A Bernardo · H Völler

    No preview · Article · Jan 2001 · DMW - Deutsche Medizinische Wochenschrift

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2000 · Thrombosis Research
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The objective of this open, randomized, multicenter study is to investigate the benefits and economic efficiency of self-management of oral anticoagulation in patients with atrial fibrillation (SMAAF study) in comparison with a group of patients given conventional care by a general practitioner or specialist. Two thousand patients suitable for self-management will be assigned at random to either the self-management group or the control group. The numbers of thromboembolic and hemorrhagic complications requiring treatment during the 2-year follow-up period will be recorded as the primary end point. The secondary endpoint variables will be maintenance of the INR value in the individual target range, INR variance, the course of complications over time, and the cost efficiency of self-management compared with the routine procedures. The last of these parameters will include the diagnostic and/or therapeutic measures carried out, the duration of inpatient hospital treatment, and the social consequences (subsequent rehabilitation treatment, inability to work, forced retirement). The estimate of the required number of patients was based on the assumption that during long-term anticoagulant therapy within the framework of primary and secondary prevention 4% of patients with chronic non-valvular atrial fibrillation would have severe thromboembolic of hemorrhagic complications each year. Since this rate can be halved by self-management, a one-tailed chi 2-test of 80% power and a 5% significance threshold would require n = 997 patients per group. The results of the SMAAF study will establish the socioeconomic benefits of self-management in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation.
    No preview · Article · May 2000 · Zeitschrift für Kardiologie