Ahmet Akin

Kirikkale University, Кырыккале, Kırıkkale, Turkey

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Publications (6)15.65 Total impact

  • M Ekici · A Ekici · H Keles · A Akin
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    ABSTRACT: In this study, we evaluated the effect of ageing on treatment response by comparing two groups of patients with asthma. All asthmatic patients in the study were assessed on repeated occasions once admitted to the hospital: soon after admission (0 h), and then at 5th, 10th, 24th, 48th, 72nd hour, 7th day and in stable period. We compared two groups of patients: younger asthmatics, which had 33 younger aged <60, and elderly asthmatics, comprised of 29 elderly aged >or=60 years. The Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) was used to assess health-related quality of life in study. The increases in FEV1% values observed soon after the hospital admission (0 h), and at 5th, 10th, 24th, 48th, 72nd hour, 7th day and in stable period in younger group were similar that in elderly group. The Borg scores observed soon after the hospital admission (0 h), and 5th, 10th, 24th, 48th and 72nd hour in elderly asthmatics was usually higher than that in younger asthmatics. However, symptom scores observed in elderly asthmatics soon after the hospital admission and at 72nd hour were higher than those in younger asthmatics. Furthermore, decreases in the total AQLQ score and asthma severity score from exacerbation to stable period in both asthmatics were not different. Present study indicated that the airways obstruction, AQLQ and other diseases characteristics of younger and elderly asthmatics could improve at similar rates with treatment. In addition, similar exacerbation severity in elderly asthmatics was perceived more intense than younger asthmatics.
    No preview · Article · May 2008 · International Journal of Clinical Practice
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    ABSTRACT: Risk factors and correlates of snoring and observed apnea in the population are not well known. This study aimed to assess risk factors and correlates of snoring and observed apnea. Parents and grandparents of students from 20 randomly selected primary schools in urban and rural areas of Kirikkale, Turkey were asked about respiratory diseases, psychological distress and sleep-related disorders, using the Respiratory Questionnaire, Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) scale and Sleep Questionnaire, respectively, which were returned by their children. Out of 13,225 parents and grandparents of primary school students 12,270 returned the questionnaires, for an overall response rate of 92.7%. Snoring and the observed apnea were more prevalent among subjects from rural than those from urban areas (52.6% vs. 46.6%, odds ratio (OR): 1.2, p<0.001 and 16.2% vs. 10.1%, OR: 1.7, p<0.001, respectively). Exposure to biomass smoke and smoking were associated with an increased risk of snoring and observed apnea, after adjusting for gender, age, body mass index, income and education in the multivariate linear model. In all subjects, increases in performance ability, daytime sleepiness, psychological distress and dyspnea scores observed in categories indicating increases in snoring intensity and observed apnea frequency constituted a trend but did always not reach statistical significance. Lastly, prevalence of traffic accidents, falling asleep at the wheel and morning headaches increased with the increments of snoring intensity and apnea frequency. Exposure to biomass smoke in rural areas may account for the higher prevalence of snoring and observed apnea. Snoring intensity and observed apnea frequency may increase prevalence of traffic accidents along with many unfavorable symptoms.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2008 · Sleep Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Respiratory disorders in childhood may predispose to pulmonary disease in late adult life. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between their effects in adult life and the characteristics of the respiratory system in childhood. A total of 10,224 parents and grandparents of students from 14 randomly selected primary schools in the city center were asked to answer questionnaires given to their children. 9,853 of 10,224 persons (the overall response rate was 96.3%) were eligible for analysis. In the questionnaire subjects were asked about respiratory system-related symptoms and characteristics. Chronic cough [14.3 vs. 4.7%, OR 3.4 (2.6-4.4), p < 0.001], chronic bronchitis [35.3 vs. 11.8%, OR 4.0 (3.4-4.8), p < 0.001] and asthma [34.2 vs. 5.1%, OR 9.6 (8.0-11.5), p < 0.001] in the childhood respiratory infection group were more common than in the control group. Childhood respiratory infections were associated with an increased risk of asthma (OR 5.6, p < 0.001), chronic bronchitis (OR 2.3, p < 0.001) and chronic cough (OR 1.5, p < 0.001), after adjusting for possible confounding factors. In addition, the presence of dampness or visible mould, wall-to-wall carpets, pets at home and parents' smoking during childhood were associated with an increased risk of frequent childhood respiratory infections. These results indicated that frequent respiratory infections during childhood might play an important role in the occurrence of chronic airway diseases in adult life. The removing of risk factors for frequent childhood respiratory infections may reduce the subsequent risk of chronic airway disease in late adult life.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2008 · Respiration
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    ABSTRACT: It has been speculated that asthma and irritable bowel syndrome may share common pathophysiological processes. To estimate the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome in young and elderly patients with stable asthma. Sixty-five young (age < 60 years) and 66 elderly (age > or = 60 years) stable asthmatics, and 119 age-matched healthy volunteers were enrolled. In all participants, presence of irritable bowel syndrome, quality of life and psychological status were evaluated. The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome in asthmatic group was higher than that in the control group (27.5% versus 16.8%; odds ratio, 1.8 [1.0-3.4]; p=0.04). The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome was significantly higher in young asthmatics than in age-matched healthy controls (36.9% versus 20.3%; odds ratio, 2.2 [1.0-5.1]; p=0.04) and than in elderly asthmatics (36.9% versus 18.2%; odds ratio, 0.3 [0.1-0.8]; p=0.01). Logistic regression analysis identified the younger age (odds ratio, 2.1 [1.1-3.8]; p=0.01), and the presence of asthma (odds ratio, 1.9 [1.0-3.5]; p=0.03) as independent risk factors for irritable bowel syndrome in all participants after adjusting for gender. We also found impaired quality of life to be associated with the presence of irritable bowel syndrome and asthma in all participants after adjusting for age and gender. The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome appears to be significantly higher in young asthmatics, but not in elderly asthmatics, compared to age-matched healthy counterparts. Potential pathogenic mechanisms of higher irritable bowel syndrome prevalence in young asthmatics need to be explained by further studies.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2005 · Digestive and Liver Disease
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    ABSTRACT: The majority of women living in rural areas in Turkey use biomass fuels for domestic energy and are exposed to high levels of indoor air pollution every day. The objective of this study was to compare the presence of chronic airway diseases (CAD) in two groups of nonsmoking women older than 40 years with (exposed group, n=397) and without a history of exposure to biomass cooking (liquid petroleum gas (LPG); control group, n=199), in 2002 in Kirikkale, Turkey. Detailed respiratory symptoms were collected with a standard questionnaire adapted from that of the British Medical Research Council. Exposure was calculated as the average hours spent daily for cooking multiplied by the number of years. CAD were defined as either chronic airway obstruction (CAO; (forced expiratory volume in 1s/forced vital capacity)<0.70), chronic bronchitis, or chronic bronchitis with CAO. The prevalence of CAD in the exposed group was found to be higher than that in the LPG group (28.5% vs. 13.6%, crude odds ratios (ORs) 2.5 (1.5--4.0), P=0.0001). The fraction of CAD attributed to exposure to biomass smoke after adjusting for possible confounding factors was 23.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) 13.4--33.2). Acute symptoms during exposure to biomass smoke were important predictors for the presence of CAD. Biomass smoke pollution is an important contributing factor in the development of CAD in nonsmoking women living in a rural area. The presence of acute symptoms during cooking in women in rural areas should signal to general practitioners the possibility of CAD.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2005 · Environmental Research
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To investigate whether psychological status affects respiratory symptom reporting and objective measures of the respiratory system. Materials and Methods: This study was performed in 1090 male gun factory workers and in 420 women exposed to biomass. The subjects were questioned using a Respiratory questionnaire. Respiratory functions were measured by portable spirometer. Psychological status was measured by HAD scale. Groups with high HAD total scores and low HAD total scores were classified by the median value. Results: In males: Chronic cough (17.6% vs. 10.7% p=0.001), chronic phlegm (13.2% vs. 8.9%, p=0.02), and probable asthma (39.5% vs. 25.5%, p=0.0001) were significantly more frequent in the group with high HAD total scores than in the group with low HAD total scores but definite asthma was not (6.2% vs. 4.6%, p=0.2). In women: Chronic cough (34.8% vs. 23.5% p=0.009), chronic phlegm (23.9% vs. 15.4%, p=0.02), and probable asthma (53.5% vs. 35.3%, p=0.0001) were significantly more frequent in the group with high HAD total scores than in the group with low HAD total scores but definite asthma was not (7.0% vs. 9.0%, p=0.4). Conclusion: Psychological status might affect the frequency of symptom reporting in respiratory questionnaires. The questionnaires and psychological status indices should be interpreted simultaneously.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2005 · Gazi Medical Journal