Markolf Hanefeld

Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Saxony, Germany

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Publications (2)1.13 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Urinary tract infection occurs with increased frequency and severity in patients with diabetes mellitus. General host factors enhancing risk for urinary tract infection in diabetics include age, metabolic control, and long term complications, primarily diabetic nephropathy and cystopathy. Alterations in the innate immune system have been described and may also contribute. Treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in diabetic patients is not indicated. Early diagnosis and prompt intervention is recommended to limit morbidity of symptomatic infection. Clinical studies comparing management of urinary tract infection in persons with diabetes compared to those without as well as diabetic patients with good or poor glucose control will be necessary to improve care of urinary infection in persons with diabetes mellitus.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2012 · Clinical nephrology
  • R. Fünfstück · L.E. Nicolle · M. Hanefeld · G. Stein
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    ABSTRACT: Diabetes mellitus is a world wide spread disease. Urinary tract infection occurs with increased frequency and severity in patients with diabetes mellitus. The risk for an infection in diabetic patients is 20times higher than in cases with normal metabolic situation. General host factors enhancing risk for urinary tract infection include age, metabolic control, long term micro-and macrovascular complications, primarily diabetic nephropathy and cystopathy. Alterations in the innate immune system have been described and may also contribute risk of urinary infections. Virulence properties of uropathogenic microorganisms influence the activity and the course of an infection. For an effective treatment strategy of urinary tract infection it is necessary to characterize the clinical risk of the disease. Treatment of asymptomatic bacteriuria in diabetic patients is not indicated. Early diagnosis and prompt intervention is recommended to limit morbidity of symptomatic infection. The quality of glycaemic control as well as the risk of hypoor hyperglycaemia determines antimicrobic intervention. Clinical studies comparing management of urinary tract infection in persons with diabetes compared to those without as well as diabetic patients with good or poor glucose control will be necessary.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2011 · Chemotherapie Journal