Valentina Marzetti

Università degli Studi G. d'Annunzio Chieti e Pescara, Chieta, Abruzzo, Italy

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Publications (6)32.56 Total impact

  • L Breda · S Franchini · V Marzetti · F Chiarelli

    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Scandinavian journal of rheumatology
  • Luciana Breda · Simone Franchini · Valentina Marzetti · Francesco Chiarelli
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    ABSTRACT: Acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy (AHEI) is a benign leukocytoclastic small-vessel vasculitis that affects infants, presenting with a classic clinical triad. Because of the self-limited progression, conservative management is the most common approach. We describe a case of AHEI apparently triggered by an Escherichia coli urinary tract infection.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Pediatric Dermatology
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    ABSTRACT: Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is one of the most common chronic diseases of childhood. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) have been recently reported in JIA patients with increased frequency. Diffucing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) is a commonly performed and clinically useful pulmonary function test that provides a quantitative measure of gas transfer in the lungs; it is often abnormal in patients with ILD. It has been known that there is a relationship between the development of pulmonary disease and treatment with various drugs such as methotrexate (MTX). Objectives The aim of this study is to evaluate total lung function and DLCO in JIA patients and to evaluate the relationship with disease activity and treatment. Methods 26 Caucasian patients with JIA were recruited with a control group of 15 healthy children. A full history, physical examination, current laboratory tests and full lung function tests including DLCO were performed in patients and controls. Results We found a reduction in DLCO values in JIA patients (mean 75%) versus controls (mean 100%, p=0.005). A sub-analysis demonstrated that the subgroup of patients on MTX had worse DLCO diffusion values compared to control group (mean 65% p=0.002). By contrast, the subgroup of JIA children taking other drugs did not present significant DLCO differences compared to controls. In addition, DLCO was significantly lower in patients with active disease compared to controls (mean 65% p=0.001), whereas no significant differences between patients with inactive disease and healthy controls was found. Conclusions This study showed a significant impairment of pulmonary DLCO in patients with JIA compared to controls. The main alterations in DLCO have been found in patient treated with MTX and in those with active disease. Moreover, a negative correlation between MTX therapy length and DLCO values was demonstrated. Further studies including larger populations are needed to confirm these data. References Disclosure of Interest None declared
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Background Human ficolins (FCN) and mannan-binding lectin (MBL2) are pattern-recognition proteins involved in innate immunity. It has been suggested a role for MBL2 and FCN2 gene polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of recurrent, severe streptococcal infections and rheumatic carditis. Objectives The aim of this study is to evaluate the presence of MBL2 and FCN2 gene polymorphisms (SNPs) in children with a history of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and to investigate their possible role in ARF clinical presentation and disease course. Methods 29 Caucasian patients with ARF were recruited with a control group of 24 healthy children. DNA was extracted for analysis of MBL2 gene (exon 1, codons: 52, 54 and 57) and FCN2 (promoter at position -4, -986 and -602). Results We found no different distribution of the analyzed MBL2 genotypes between patients and controls. Besides, no significant association between MBL2 SNPs and ARF clinical manifestations has been demonstrated. We observed that the FCN2 GGA haplotype (particularly the G polymorphism at position -986) seems to be significantly more represented in the control group (G in -986 6,9% vs 41,7% patients vs controls, p=0,003).The FCN2 G polymorphism at position -986 (0% vs 41.7% carditis vs controls, p=0,03) is also significantly less represented in children with carditis. The FCN2 G polymorphism at position -4 (11,1% vs 50% arthritis vs controls, p=0,04) is significantly less represented in children with arthritis. Conclusions The FCN2 GGA haplotype (especially the G polymorphism at position -986) might be considered a protective factor for ARF development. In particular, the FCN2 G polymorphism at position -986 seems to have a protective role for the development of rheumatic carditis and the FCN2 G polymorphism at position -4 seems to represent a protective factor for the development of arthritis. Further studies including larger populations and evaluating circulating FCN2 protein are needed to confirm these data. References Disclosure of Interest None declared
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
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    Preview · Article · Mar 2013 · Rheumatology (Oxford, England)
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    ABSTRACT: To investigate the incidence and describe the characteristics of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) in the pediatric population in a community-based healthcare delivery system of the central Italy region of Abruzzo during 2000-2009. A retrospective study was conducted in Abruzzo to identify patients aged <18 years with a diagnosis of ARF between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2009. Each patient's age, sex, date of diagnosis, age at disease presentation, and fulfilled Jones criteria were recorded. A total of 88 patients meeting the Jones criteria for the diagnosis of ARF were identified, with arthritis in 59.1% of the patients, carditis in 48.9%, erythema marginatum in 11.4%, 5.7% with chorea, and 4.6% with subcutaneous nodules. Residual chronic rheumatic heart disease was present in 44.3% of the children. Age at diagnosis ranged from 2.5 to 17 years (average, 8.7 ± 4.0 years). Twelve children (13.6%) were under age 5 years. The overall incidence rate of ARF was 4.1/100 000. The lowest incidence rate was documented in the year 2000 (2.26/100 000), and the highest in 2006 (5.58/100 000). Our data indicate that ARF has not disappeared in industrialized countries and still causes significant residual rheumatic heart disease. Pediatricians should routinely consider the diagnoses of streptococcal pharyngitis and ARF to reduce long-term morbidity and mortality.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2011 · The Journal of pediatrics