Luiz Augusto Perandini

University of São Paulo, San Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil

Are you Luiz Augusto Perandini?

Claim your profile

Publications (15)67.28 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective The aim of this study was to examine the effects of acute exercise on insulin signaling in skeletal muscle of women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and controls (CTRL).Methods Fifteen women with obesity and PCOS and 12 body mass index-matched CTRL participated in this study. Subjects performed a 40-min single bout of exercise. Muscle biopsies were performed before and 60 min after exercise. Selected proteins were assessed by Western blotting.ResultsCTRL, but not PCOS, showed a significant increase in PI3-k p85 and AS160 Thr 642 after a single bout of exercise (P = 0.018 and P = 0.018, respectively). Only PCOS showed an increase in Akt Thr 308 and AMPK phosphorylation after exercise (P = 0.018 and P = 0.018, respectively). Total GLUT4 expression was comparable between groups (P > 0.05). GLUT4 translocation tended to be significantly higher in both groups after exercise (PCOS: P = 0.093; CTRL: P = 0.091), with no significant difference between them (P > 0.05).ConclusionsA single bout of exercise elicited similar GLUT4 translocation in skeletal muscle of PCOS and CTRL, despite a slightly differential pattern of protein phosphorylation. The absence of impairment in GLUT4 translocation suggests that PCOS patients with obesity and insulin resistance may benefit from exercise training.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Obesity
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to evaluate changes in the cytokines INF-γ, IL-10, IL-6, TNF-α and soluble TNF receptors (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2) in response to single bouts of acute moderate and intense exercise in systemic lupus erythematosus women with active (SLE(ACTIVE)) and inactive (SLE(INACTIVE)) disease. Twelve SLE(INACTIVE) women (age: 35.3 ± 5.7 yrs; BMI: 25.6±3.4 kg/m2), eleven SLE(ACTIVE) women (age: 30.4 ± 4.5 yrs; BMI: 26.1±4.8 kg/m2), and 10 age- and BMI-matched healthy control women (HC) performed 30 minutes of acute moderate (~50% of VO(2)peak) and intense (~70% of VO(2)peak) exercise bout. Cytokines and soluble TNF receptors were assessed at baseline, immediately after, every 30 minutes up to three hours, and 24 hours after both acute exercise bouts. In response to acute moderate exercise, cytokines and soluble TNF receptors levels remained unchanged in all groups (P>0.05), except for a reduction in IL-6 levels in the SLE(ACTIVE) group at the 60th and 180th minutes of recovery (P<0.05), and a reduction in sTNFR1 levels in the HC group at the 90th, 120th, 150th, 180th minutes of recovery (P<0.05). The SLE(INACTIVE) group showed higher levels of TNF-α, sTNFR1, and sTNFR2 at all time points when compared with the HC group (P<0.05). Also, the SLE(ACTIVE) group showed higher levels of IL-6 at the 60th minute of recovery (P<0.05) when compared with the HC group. After intense exercise, sTNFR1 levels were reduced at the 150th (P=0.041) and 180th (P=0.034) minutes of recovery in the SLE(INACTIVE) group, whereas the other cytokines and sTNFR2 levels remained unchanged (P>0.05). In the HC group, IL-10, TNF-α, sTNFR1, and sTNFR2 levels did not change, whilst INF-γ levels decreased (P=0.05) and IL-6 levels increased immediately after the exercise (P=0.028), returning to baseline levels 24 hours later (P > 0.05). When compared with the HC group, the SLE(INACTIVE) group showed higher levels of TNF-α and sTNFR2 in all time points, and higher levels of sTNFR1 at the end of exercise and at the 30th minute of recovery (P<0.05). The SLE(ACTIVE) group also showed higher levels of TNF-α at all time points when compared with the HC group (P<0.05), (except after 90 min, 120 min and 24 hours of recovery) (P>0.05). Importantly, the levels of all cytokine and soluble TNF receptors returned to baseline 24 hours after the end of acute exercise, irrespective of its intensity, in all three groups (P>0.05). This study demonstrated that both the single bouts of acute moderate and intense exercise induced mild and transient changes in cytokine levels in both SLE(INACTIVE) and SLE(ACTIVE) women, providing novel evidence that acute aerobic exercise does not trigger inflammation in patients with this disease.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Exercise immunology review

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Hepatology

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Journal of Hepatology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the study was to report on the safety and feasibility of the application of maximal physical tests in a heterogeneous cohort of rheumatic patients. This is a 5-year retrospective descriptive report on the incidence of events associated with maximal physical testing from 536 patients, totalizing 5,910 tests. Tests were classified as cardiopulmonary, muscle strength, and physical functioning tests. Any adverse events during the tests and limiting factors incurring in tests cancellation were reported. Eighteen out of 641 cardiopulmonary exercise tests had an adverse occurrence, with cardiac disturbance (1.4 % of total tests) being the most prevalent. Moreover, 14 out of 641 tests were not feasible. Out of 3,478 tests comprising leg press, bench press, knee extension, and handgrip tests, 15 tests had an adverse event. The most common occurrence was joint pain (0.4 % of total tests), which was also the most frequent factor precluding testing (0.5 % of total tests). Forty-five out of 3,478 (1.3 %) of the tests were not feasible. There was a very low incidence of events (0.2 %) during the physical functioning tests. Joint pain was the only adverse event during the tests, whereas physical limitations were the most important barriers for the execution of the tests (1.1 % of total tests). The incidence of limiting events in this test was 1.6 % (n = 29). This report brings new data on the safety and feasibility of maximal physical testing in rheumatic patients. The physical tests described in this study may be applied for testing rheumatic patients both in research and clinical setting.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · Rheumatology International
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: IntroductionOur aim was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of a low-intensity resistance training program combined with partial blow flow restriction (BFR training) in a cohort of patients with polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM).Methods In total, 13 patients with PM and DM completed a 12-week twice a week low-intensity (that is, 30% one-repetition-maximum (1RM)) resistance exercise training program combined with partial blood flow restriction (BFR). Assessments of muscle strength, physical function, quadriceps cross sectional (CSA) area, health-related quality of life, and clinical and laboratory parameters were assessed at baseline and after the intervention.ResultsThe BFR training program was effective in increasing the maximal dynamic strength in both the leg-press (19.6%, P <0.001) and knee-extension exercises (25.2% P <0.001), as well as in the timed-stands (15.1%, P <0.001) and timed-up-and-go test (¿4.5%, P =0.002). Quadriceps CSA was also significantly increased after the intervention (4.57%, P =0.01). Similarly, all of the components of the Short Form-36 Health Survey, the Health Assessment Questionnaire scores, and the patient- and physician reported Visual Analogue Scale were significantly improved after training (P <0.05). Importantly, no clinical evidence or any other self-reported adverse event were found. Laboratory parameters (creatine kinase and aldolase) were also unchanged (P >0.05) after the intervention.Conclusions We demonstrated that a 12-week supervised low-intensity resistance training program associated with partial blood flow restriction may be safe and effective in improving muscle strength and function as well as muscle mass and health-related quality of life in patients with PM and DM.Trial registrationClinicaltrials.gov NCT01501019. Registered November 29, 2011.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · Arthritis Research & Therapy
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation. This study sought to assess the effects of an exercise training program on cytokines and soluble TNF receptors in response to acute exercise in SLE women. Eight SLE women and ten sex-, age- and BMI-comparable healthy controls (HC) participated in this study. Prior to and after a 12-week aerobic exercise training program, cytokines and soluble TNF receptors were assessed at rest and in response to single bouts of acute moderate/intense exercise. HC performed the acute exercise bouts only at baseline. After the exercise training program, there was a decrease in resting sTNFR2 levels (P=0.025) and a tend to reduction IL-10 levels (P=0.093) in SLE. The resting levels of IL-6, IL-10, and TNF-α after the exercise training in SLE reached HC levels (P>0.05). In response to a single bout of acute moderate exercise, the area under the curve (AUC) of IL-10 was significantly reduced after the exercise training program in SLE (P=0.043), and the AUC of IL-10, IL-6, TNF-α, and sTNFR1 of SLE approached control values (P>0.05). In response to a single bout of acute intense exercise, the AUC of IL-10 was significantly reduced in SLE (P=0.015). Furthermore, the AUC of sTNFR2 tended to decrease after exercise training program in SLE (P=0.084), but it did not reach control values (P=0.001). An aerobic exercise training program attenuated the inflammatory milieu in SLE women, revealing a novel homeostatic immunomodulatory role of exercise in an autoimmunity condition.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014 · Journal of Applied Physiology
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of an exercise training program on lipid profile and composition of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subfractions in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and healthy controls. A 12-week, randomized trial was conducted. Thirty-three physically inactive SLE patients were randomly assigned into two groups: trained (SLE-TR, n = 17) and non-trained (SLE-NT, n = 16). A gender-, BMI-, and age-matched healthy control groups (C-TR, n = 11) also underwent the exercise program. Subjects were assessed at baseline (Pre) and 12 weeks after the 3-month exercise training program (Post) for lipid profile (HDL, low-density lipoprotein, very low-density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol and triglycerides levels) and composition of the HDL subfractions HDL2 and HDL3. SLE patients showed significantly lower contents of Apo A-I, phospholipid, and triglyceride in the HDL3 subfraction (p 0.05, within-group comparisons), although there was a trend toward decreased circulating Apo B levels (p = 0.06, ES = −0.3, within-group comparison). In contrast, the same exercise training program was effective in increasing contents of cholesterol, triglyceride, and phospholipid in the HDL2 subfraction in the C-TR group (p = 0.036, ES = 2.06; p = 0.038, ES = 1.77; and p = 0.0021, ES = 2.37, respectively, within-group comparisons), whereas no changes were observed in the composition of the HDL3 subfraction. This study showed that SLE patients have a less effective response to a 12-week exercise training program than healthy individuals, with regard to lipid profile and chemical composition of HDL subfractions. These results reinforce the need for further studies to define the optimal training protocol to improve lipid profile and particularly the HDL composition in these patients (registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01515163).
    No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · Rheumatology International
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease associated with chronic inflammation. Pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) axis activation leads to the production of several bioactive hormones, such as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and the neuropeptide α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH). Both hormones are closely related to the inflammatory process with pro- or anti-inflammatory effects. Although physical exercise has been described as a promoter of alterations in the neuroendocrine profile, no studies have addressed the participation of melanocortins in SLE patients in response to acute aerobic exercise. Objectives To evaluate α-MSH production in SLE patients under acute aerobic exercise. Methods Ten active SLE patients [age: 29.9±4.2yrs; body mass index (BMI): 26.0±4.8 kg/m2; SLEDAI: 5.9±2.1; glucocorticoid: 16.0±6.0 mg] and 10 age- and BMI-matched healthy controls performed 30 minutes of aerobic exercise (∼70% of VO2 peak) in a treadmill. The a-MSH and ACTH serum levels were assessed at baseline and immediately after exercise session by a multiplex system (HNP-35K kit, Millipore, Billerica, MA, USA). Results Similar levels of a-MSH were observed at baseline between active SLE patients and healthy controls (P=0.69). However, after exercise, a distinct pattern of response was noted (Fig. 1). The serum levels of a-MSH was not altered in healthy controls, but a significant increase in mean levels was observed in active SLE patients after exercise (92.39±16.12 vs. 146.23±25.01 pg/mL, P=0.04). ACTH levels did not differ between groups at baseline and after exercise (P>0.05). Conclusions The present study provides novel evidence that acute aerobic exercise induces a hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response with an increase in the levels of neuropeptide α-MSH in active SLE patients. We speculate that this is an exacerbated adaptive response to exercise stress to avoid further stimulation of proinflammatory cytokines in these patients. Disclosure of Interest : None declared DOI 10.1136/annrheumdis-2014-eular.5206
    No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The purpose of present study was to evaluate the effects of maximal acute physical exercise on prothrombin time/international normalized ratio (PT/INR) in patients with primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS) under oral anticoagulation with warfarin and the safety of acute exercise in regard to thrombosis and bleeding risk. Eighteen physically inactive women with PAPS (Sydney criteria) with exclusive venous events and without thrombocytopenia were included. All patients were under stable warfarin therapy (PT/INR target: 2.0-3.0). Eighteen age-matched healthy sedentary women without thrombosis/bleeding disorders were selected as controls. All subjects performed a maximal exercise test, and capillary blood samples were obtained pre-, post- and at 1-h post-exercise (recovery time) for PT/INR analysis using a portable CoaguCheck. PAPS patients and controls had similar mean age (31.50 ± 8.06 vs. 29.61 ± 7.05 years, p = 0.46) and body mass index (24.16 ± 3.67 vs. 24.66 ± 2.71 kg/m(2), p = 0.65). PAPS had a mild but significant increase in PT/INR value at 1-h post-exercise (recovery) compared with pre- (2.33 ± 0.34 vs. 2.26 ± 0.29, p = 0.001) and post-exercise (2.33 ± 0.34 vs. 2.26 ± 0.32, p = 0.001) that was observed in 61.11 % of these patients. None of the subjects had thrombotic or bleeding complications related to the acute exercise. Acute exercise in patients with PAPS with exclusive venous thrombosis was safe with a minor increase in PT/INR. This is an important step to introduce regular exercise training as a therapeutic tool in the management of these patients.
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Rheumatology International
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A growing number of studies have suggested that exercise may promote therapeutic effects in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. This prospective case series study aimed to report on the effects of exercise in patients with persistent active myositis. Three patients with persistent active polymyositis were submitted to a 12-week supervised exercise program comprising both aerobic and strength exercises. After the intervention, the patients presented improvements in selected parameters of muscle function and aerobic conditioning. In addition, an overall improvement was detected in the quality of life, as measured by both the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey and the Health Assessment Questionnaire questionnaires. Importantly, exercise did not increase serum levels of creatine kinase and aldolase. The findings herein suggest that a combined aerobic and strength training program may be tolerable and potentially effective in improving muscle function, aerobic conditioning, and quality of life in patients with persistent active polymyositis.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2013 · Journal of clinical rheumatology: practical reports on rheumatic & musculoskeletal diseases
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Primary antiphospholipid syndrome (PAPS) is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. Aerobic capacity and cardiac autonomic control are also associated with these risks. The aim of our study was to assess aerobic capacity and cardiac autonomic control in PAPS patients. Thirteen women with PAPS and 13 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and body mass index were enrolled for the study. Both groups were sedentary and were not under chronotropic, antidepressants and hypolipemiant drugs. All subjects performed a treadmill-graded maximal exercise. Aerobic capacity was assessed by peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), time at anaerobic ventilatory threshold (VAT) and respiratory compensation point (RCP) and time-to-exhaustion, whereas cardiac autonomic control was assessed by chronotropic reserve (CR) and heart rate recovery at the first and second minutes after graded exercise (HRR1min and HRR2min, respectively). All aerobic capacity indexes were reduced more in PAPS patients than in healthy subjects: VO2peak (30.2 ± 4.7 vs 34.6 ± 4.3 ml.kg(-1).min(-1), p = 0.021), time at VAT (3.0 ± 1.5 vs 5.0 ± 2.0 min, p = 0.016), time at RCP (6.5 ± 2.0 vs 8.0 ± 2.0 min, p = 0.050), time-to-exhaustion (8.5 ± 2.0 vs 11.0 ± 2.5 min, p = 0.010). HRR1min (22 ± 9 vs 30 ± 7 bpm, p = 0.032) and HRR2min (33 ± 9 vs 46 ± 8 bpm, p = 0.002) were delayed in PAPS patients compared to healthy controls but CR was not significantly different (p = 0.272). In conclusion, an impaired aerobic capacity and cardiac autonomic control was identified in PAPS.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2013 · Lupus
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the efficacy of a 3-month exercise training program in counteracting the chronotropic incompetence and delayed heart rate recovery in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A 12-week randomized trial was conducted. Twenty-four inactive SLE patients were randomly assigned into 2 groups: trained (T; n = 15, 3-month exercise program) and nontrained (NT; n = 13). A sex-, body mass index-, and age-matched healthy control (C) group (n = 8) also underwent the exercise program. Subjects were assessed at baseline and at 12 weeks after training. Main measurements included the chronotropic reserve (CR) and the heart rate (HR) recovery (ΔHRR) as defined by the difference between HR at peak exercise and at both the first (ΔHRR1) and second (ΔHRR2) minutes after the exercise test. Neither the NT SLE patients nor the C group presented any change in the CR or in ΔHRR1 and ΔHRR2 (P > 0.05). The exercise training program was effective in promoting significant increases in CR (P = 0.007, effect size [ES] 1.15) and in ΔHRR1 and ΔHRR2 (P = 0.009, ES 1.12 and P = 0.002, ES 1.11, respectively) in the SLE T group when compared with the NT group. Moreover, the HR response in SLE patients after training achieved parameters comparable to the C group, as evidenced by the analysis of variance and by the Z score analysis (P > 0.05, T versus C). Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index scores remained stable throughout the study. A 3-month exercise training program was safe and capable of reducing the chronotropic incompetence and the delayed ΔHRR observed in physically inactive SLE patients.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2012
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Chronic inflammation is a common feature shared by several autoimmune rheumatic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, systemic sclerosis, and ankylosing spondylitis. Therefore, blocking or reducing inflammation is one of the major treatment strategies in these diseases. In this context, exercise training has emerged as a potential therapeutic tool in counteracting systemic inflammation, thereby leading to better clinical outcomes. The aims of this review are i) to provide a summary of the clinical effects of exercise training in selected autoimmune rheumatic diseases; and ii) to discuss the potential anti-inflammatory role of exercise training in autoimmune rheumatic diseases, stressing the gaps in literature and the clinical and scientific perspectives in the field.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2012 · Autoimmunity reviews
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We aimed to gather knowledge on the cardiac autonomic modulation in patients with fibromyalgia (FM) in response to exercise and to investigate whether this population suffers from chronotropic incompetence (CI). Fourteen women with FM (age: 46 ± 3 years; body mass index (BMI): 26.6 ± 1.4 kg/m2) and 14 gender-, BMI- (25.4 ± 1.3 kg/m2), and age-matched (age: 41 ± 4 years) healthy individuals (CTRL) took part in this cross-sectional study. A treadmill cardiorespiratory test was performed and heart-rate (HR) response during exercise was evaluated by the chronotropic reserve. HR recovery (deltaHRR) was defined as the difference between HR at peak exercise and at both first (deltaHRR1) and second (deltaHRR2) minutes after the exercise test. FM patients presented lower maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max) when compared with healthy subjects (22 ± 1 versus CTRL: 32 ± 2 mL/kg/minute, respectively; P < 0.001). Additionally, FM patients presented lower chronotropic reserve (72.5 ± 5 versus CTRL: 106.1 ± 6, P < 0.001), deltaHRR1 (24.5 ± 3 versus CTRL: 32.6 ± 2, P = 0.059) and deltaHRR2 (34.3 ± 4 versus CTRL: 50.8 ± 3, P = 0.002) than their healthy peers. The prevalence of CI was 57.1% among patients with FM. Patients with FM who undertook a graded exercise test may present CI and delayed HR recovery, both being indicative of cardiac autonomic impairment and higher risk of cardiovascular events and mortality.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2011 · Arthritis research & therapy