Amandeep K Shergill

University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States

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Publications (55)360.62 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this document that updates a previously issued consensus statement and a technology status evaluation report on this topic.1 In preparing this guideline, a search of the medical literature was performed by using PubMed between January 1975 and May 2015, with the use of the search terms "pancreatic AND malignancy," "endoscopy," "EUS," and "ERCP." Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When limited or no data existed from welldesigned prospective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Recommendations for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time the documents are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of recommendations contained in this document. This document may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations were based on reviewed studies and were graded on the strength of the supporting evidence. The strength of individual recommendations is based both on the aggregate evidence quality and an assessment of the anticipated benefits and harms. Weaker recommendations are indicated by phrases such as "we suggest," whereas stronger recommendations are typically stated as "we recommend." This guideline is intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. It is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decpuraging any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead anendoscopist to take a course of action that varies from these recommendations and suggestions.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016
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    ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this text. In preparing this guideline, a search of the medical literature was performed using PubMed and the Cochrane Database, with dates of search from August 1966 to December 2014. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When limited or no data exist from well'designed prospective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Guidelines for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time the guidelines are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this guideline. This guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations were based on reviewed studies and were graded on the strength of the supporting evidence. This guideline is intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. This guideline is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from these guidelines.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy
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    ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this text. In preparing this guideline, a search of the medical literature was performed by using PubMed from January 1980 through October 2014 by using the keyword(s) "acute pancreatitis," "chronic pancreatitis," " autoimmune pancreatitis," " benign pancreatic disease," " gastrointestinal endoscopy," " endoscopy," and " endoscopic procedures." Pertinent studies published in English were reviewed, and additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When little or no data exist from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Guidelines for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time the guidelines are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this guideline. This guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations were based on reviewed studies and were graded on the strength of the supporting evidence by using the GRADE criteria (Table 1).(1) This guideline is intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. This guideline is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from these guidelines.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy
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    ABSTRACT: The protective effect of colonoscopy against proximal colorectal cancer is variable and depends on the detection and complete removal of precancerous polyps. To estimate the efficacy of colonoscopy in a medical center with open-access screening colonoscopy since 1998. Nested case-control study with incidence density sampling. University-affiliated Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Colorectal cancer (CRC) cases and control subjects selected from screening age patients matched by age, gender, and date of first primary care visit. Colonoscopy preceding the CRC diagnosis date. A total of 20.2% of CRC cases had a colonoscopy in the preceding 10 years compared with 49.0% of control subjects (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], .20; 95% confidence interval [CI], .11-.34). Colonoscopy was strongly associated with decreased odds of both distal CRC (aOR, .16; 95% CI, .07-.34) and proximal CRC (aOR, .26; 95% CI, .11-.58). The fraction of cases attributed to interval cancers was 10.5%. Missed lesions predominantly localized to the cecum and rectum, and recurrent lesions clustered in the hepatic flexure. Cecal intubation rate was 93% (98% in adequately prepped patients), and the adenoma detection rate was 45.2% in the control group. Single-center, retrospective case-control design. In an open access colonoscopy program characterized by a high cecal intubation rate and adenoma detection rate, colonoscopy was strongly associated with reduced odds of both distal and proximal CRC. Among interval cancers, missed lesions clustered in the cecum and rectum and recurrent lesions in the hepatic flexure. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy
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    ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this text. In preparing this guideline, a search of the medical literature was performed by using PubMed from January 1980 through March 2014 by using the keyword(s) "gastric tumor," "gastric cancer," "gastric lymphoma," "gastric and adenocarcinoma," "gastrointestinal stromal tumor," "gastrointestinal endoscopy," "endoscopy," "endoscopic procedures," and "procedures." The search was supplemented by accessing the "related articles" feature of PubMed, with articles identified on PubMed as the references. Pertinent studies published in English were reviewed. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When little or no data exist from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Guidelines for the appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time that the guidelines are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this guideline. This guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations were based on reviewed studies and were graded on the strength of the supporting evidence by using the GRADE criteria (Table 1). (1) This guideline is intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. This guideline is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from these guidelines.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy

  • No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Gastroenterology
  • Benjamin Hassid · Ma Somsouk · Ellen Zufall · John Hixson · Amandeep Shergill

    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Gastroenterology
  • Source
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    ABSTRACT: Gastrointestinal T lymphocytes are critical for mucosal immunity and HIV pathogenesis, yet little is known about normal T cell numbers and phenotypes in different regions of the gut, or the degree to which ART can restore levels to those of HIV-uninfected individuals. To investigate these questions, we measured T cell frequencies and markers of memory, activation, anergy, and homing in the blood, ileum, and rectum of HIV- and ART-suppressed HIV+ adults. In HIV- individuals, T cell frequencies and phenotypes differed significantly between sites. Compared to HIV- adults, HIV+ adults had lower absolute CD4+T cell counts in the ileal lamina propria and lower relative CD4+T cell counts in the blood and ileum. In the gut, HIV+ adults had a higher proportion of CD38+ CD4+T cells, a lower proportion of terminally-differentiated effector cells, and, in the rectum, a higher proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells. In HIV+ individuals, relative CD4+T cell numbers in the ileum correlated with the proportion of CTLA-4+ CD4+T cells, whereas in the rectum, they tended to correlate with the proportion of circulating CD4+T cells expressing α4β7 or CCR6. Mechanisms of T cell reconstitution may differ throughout the gut, with homing contributing more in the rectum while ileal reconstitution is associated with mucosal CD4+T cell anergy.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · PLoS ONE
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy ( ASGE) prepared this text. In preparing this guideline, a search of the medical literature by using PubMed from January 1980 through March 2014 was performed by using the keywords "inflammatory bowel disease," "Crohn's disease," "ulcerative colitis," "gastrointestinal endoscopy,'' "endoscopy,'' "endoscopic procedures,'' and "procedures.''Pertinent studies published in English were reviewed, and additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When little or no data existed from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis was given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Guidelines for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time that the guidelines are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this guideline. This guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations were based on reviewed studies and were graded on the strength of the supporting evidence by using the GRADE criteria1 (Table 1). This guideline is intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. This guideline is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from these guidelines.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • Source
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    ABSTRACT: The American Journal of Gastroenterology is published by Nature Publishing Group (NPG) on behalf of the American College of Gastroenterology (ACG). Ranked the #1 clinical journal covering gastroenterology and hepatology*, The American Journal of Gastroenterology (AJG) provides practical and professional support for clinicians dealing with the gastroenterological disorders seen most often in patients. Published with practicing clinicians in mind, the journal aims to be easily accessible, organizing its content by topic, both online and in print. www.amjgastro.com, *2007 Journal Citation Report (Thomson Reuters, 2008)
    Preview · Article · Mar 2015 · The American Journal of Gastroenterology
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this text. In preparing this guideline, a search of the medical literature was performed by using PubMed from January 1980 through December 2013 by using the keyword(s) "choledocholithiasis," "biliary stricture," "primary sclerosing cholangitis," "cholangiopathy," "sphincter of Oddi dysfunction," "biliary leak," "choledochal cyst," "choledochocele," AND "gastrointestinal endoscopy," "ERCP," "endoscopy," and "endoscopic procedures." The search was supplemented by accessing the "related articles" feature of PubMed, with articles identified on PubMed as the references. Pertinent studies published in English were reviewed. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When little or no data exist from well-designed projective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Guidelines for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time the guidelines are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this guideline. This guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations were based on reviewed studies and were graded on the strength of the supporting evidence using the GRADE criteria1 (Table 1). Copyright
    No preview · Article · Feb 2015 · Gastrointestinal Endoscopy

  • No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy prepared this text. In preparing this document, a search of the medical literature was performed by using PubMed. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When limited or no data exist from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Recommendations for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time the guidelines are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this document. This document may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations were based on reviewed studies and were graded on the strength of the supporting evidence (Table 1).(1) This document is intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. It is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from these recommendations.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
  • Source
    Amandeep K. Shergill · Francis A. Farraye
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    ABSTRACT: Surveillance colonoscopy in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) with colonic involvement is recommended by multiple national and international gastrointestinal societies. Recommendations differ on the timing of initial screening colonoscopy, recommended surveillance intervals, optimal technique for dysplasia detection, and management of endoscopically visible and nonvisible dysplasia. This article reviews current society guidelines, highlighting similarities and differences, in an attempt to summarize areas of consensus on surveillance protocols in IBD, while drawing attention to controversial areas in need of further research.
    Preview · Article · Jul 2014 · Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Clinics of North America

  • No preview · Article · May 2014 · Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
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    ABSTRACT: We recommend that endoscopy in children be performed by pediatric-trained endoscopists whenever possible. We recommend that adult-trained endoscopists coordinate their services with pediatricians and pediatric specialists when they are needed to perform endoscopic procedures in children. We recommend that endoscopy be performed within 24 hours in symptomatic pediatric patients with known or suspected ingestion of caustic substances. We recommend emergent foreign-body removal of esophageal button batteries, as well as 2 or more rare-earth neodymium magnets. We recommend that procedural and resuscitative equipment appropriate for pediatric use should be readily available during endoscopic procedures. We recommend that personnel trained specifically in pediatric life support and airway management be readily available during sedated procedures in children. We recommend the use of endoscopes smaller than 6 mm in diameter in infants and children weighing less than 10 kg. We recommend the use of standard adult duodenoscopes for performing ERCP in children who weigh at least 10 kg. We recommend the placement of 12F or 16F percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy tubes in children who weigh less than 50 kg.
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this text. In preparing this document, a search of the medical literature pertaining to this topic published between January 1990-March 2013 was performed by using PubMed. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When few or no data exist from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Recommendations for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time that the documents are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this document. This document represents an updated review of previous ASGE guidance on this topic. 1,2 This document may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations are based on reviewed studies and are graded on the strength of the supporting evidence3 (Table 1). The strength of individual recommendations is based on both the aggregate evidence quality and an assessment of the anticipated benefits and harms. Weaker recommendations are indicated by phrases such as "We suggest." whereas stronger recommendations are typically stated as " We recommend... ." This document is intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. It is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from these recommendations.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2014 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this update of a previous ASGE guideline.(1) In preparing this guideline, a search of the medical literature was performed by using PubMed for the period 1990-2013. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When few or no data exist from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Guidelines for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time that the guidelines are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this guideline. This guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations are based on reviewed studies and are graded on the strength of the supporting evidence (Table 1).(2) The strength of individual recommendations is based on both the aggregate evidence quality and an assessment of the anticipated benefits and harms. Weaker recommendations are indicated by phrases such as "We suggest..." whereas stronger recommendations are typically stated as "We recommend..." This guideline is intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. This guideline is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from these guidelines.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2014 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy
  • D.A. Fisher · A.K. Shergill · D.S. Early

    No preview · Article · Sep 2013
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This is one of a series of statements discussing the use of GI endoscopy in common clinical situations. The Standards of Practice Committee of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) prepared this text. In preparing this guideline, a search of the medical literature was performed by using PubMed. Additional references were obtained from the bibliographies of the identified articles and from recommendations of expert consultants. When few or no data exist from well-designed prospective trials, emphasis is given to results from large series and reports from recognized experts. Guidelines for appropriate use of endoscopy are based on a critical review of the available data and expert consensus at the time that the guidelines are drafted. Further controlled clinical studies may be needed to clarify aspects of this guideline. This guideline may be revised as necessary to account for changes in technology, new data, or other aspects of clinical practice. The recommendations are based on reviewed studies and are graded on the strength of the supporting evidence (Table 1). 1 The strength of individual recommendations is based on both the aggregate evidence quality and an assessment of the anticipated benefits and harms. Weaker recommendations are indicated by phrases such as "We suggest...," whereas stronger recommendations are typically stated as "We recommend..." These statements are included in Table 2, rather than as specific statements, as in other Standards of Practice documents. This guideline is intended to be an educational device to provide information that may assist endoscopists in providing care to patients. This guideline is not a rule and should not be construed as establishing a legal standard of care or as encouraging, advocating, requiring, or discouraging any particular treatment. Clinical decisions in any particular case involve a complex analysis of the patient's condition and available courses of action. Therefore, clinical considerations may lead an endoscopist to take a course of action that varies from these guidelines.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2013 · Gastrointestinal endoscopy

Publication Stats

864 Citations
360.62 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2008-2015
    • University of California, San Francisco
      • • Division of Gastroenterology
      • • Division of Hospital Medicine
      • • Department of Medicine
      San Francisco, California, United States
  • 2011-2014
    • San Francisco VA Medical Center
      San Francisco, California, United States