Friederike Kreisel

Washington University in St. Louis, San Luis, Missouri, United States

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Publications (45)161.97 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: De novo CD5+ diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (DLBCL) are a distinct subgroup of DLBCL with poor prognosis. However the role of rituximab-containing therapy and salvage stem cell transplantation in this patients' population remain to be defined. We retrospectively reviewed clinical features and outcomes of 102 patients with de novo CD5+ DLBCL treated with rituximab-containing therapy at 9 different institutions. By Hans' criteria, 64 patients had activated B-cell (ABC) subtype, 24 germinal center B-cell (GCB) subtype, and 14 were not evaluated. No patients had a myc translocation. Eighty-three patients were treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone (R-CHOP), 7 with rituximab, etoposide, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone (R-EPOCH) and 6 with R-CHOP with methotrexate, 3 g/m(2) . The overall response rate to frontline therapy was 85%. The 3-year progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for all patients were 40% and 65%, respectively. The 3-year PFS for ABC- and GCB-subtypes was 34% and 45%, respectively. The 3-year OS for ABC- and GCB-subtypes was 62% and 67%, respectively. The median time to second treatment failure was 3 months and 1 month for ABC- and GCB-subtypes, respectively. Twenty of 28 (71%) transplanted patients with autologous, allogeneic, or both, relapsed. This study confirms the poor prognosis of de novo CD5+ DLBCL in a large multi-center cohort despite initial rituximab-containing chemotherapy and suggests that stem cell transplantation fails to salvage the majority of these patients. Approaches to prevent recurrence and/or novel therapies for relapsed disease are needed for this subgroup of DLBCL patients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · American Journal of Hematology

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Leukemia & lymphoma
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    ABSTRACT: Although the expression of T-cell antigens and proteins associated with tumor-infiltrating T-lymphocytes (TILs), regulatory T cells (T-regs), and B-cell development have been evaluated in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), few studies correlate these proteins' expression patterns with clinical outcome. The purpose of this study was to evaluate proteins expressed in the Reed-Sternberg cells (RSCs) and TILs of cHLs at initial diagnosis to determine their prognostic significance. The expression of 12 proteins in RSCs and TILs from 88 diagnostic cHL biopsies was quantitated and correlated to overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7, CD25, PD1, TIA1, MUM1, and ZAP70 expression in RSCs did not correlate with OS or PFS, nor did programmed death 1 (PD1) expression in TILs. High numbers of TIA1-positive TILs (≥50%) correlated with OS (P=0.027), but not PFS (P=0.993) in univariate analysis. Expression of CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, and/or TIA1 (6%) in RSCs was associated with lymphocyte-rich/mixed-cellularity subtype (P=0.032). High International Prognostic Score (IPS; P=0.036), and high stage (P=0.046) were independent predictors of worse PFS in univariate analysis. Low IPS (P=0.003) and nodular sclerosing subtype (P=0.022) were associated with better OS in univariate analysis. Only the IPS predicted OS in multivariate (P=0.009) analysis. High TIA1+ TILs correlated with worse clinical outcomes for cHLs, as did PAX5-RSCs (P=0.024), although only 2/74 cases were shown to be negative for this marker, suggesting that the tumor microenvironment and a transcription factor crucial for B-cell development are critical biological determinants of the disease course.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Applied immunohistochemistry & molecular morphology: AIMM / official publication of the Society for Applied Immunohistochemistry
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    ABSTRACT: The flow cytometric evaluation of peripheral lymphocytosis has led to a dramatic increase in the diagnosis of early stage chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL). Few studies exist to better delineate the natural history and differences between MBL and CLL. Applying the recently updated B-lymphocyte threshold of 5 × 10(9) B lymphocytes/L for the diagnosis of CLL, we evaluated the differences in initial presentation, disease progression, time to treatment (TTT), and 10-year overall survival rates between patients with less than 5 × 10 × 10(9)/L, 5 to 10 × 10(9)/L, and more than 10 × 10(9)/L B cells. These clinical/treatment parameters were also compared among the MBL, 5 to 10 CLL Rai stage 0, and more than 10 CLL Rai stage 0 groups. In total, 310 patients were included, with 67 in the less than 5, 75 in the 5 to 10, and 168 in the more than 10 B-cell groups. Statistically significant differences were seen when comparing the 5 to 10 and more than 10 B-cell groups regarding anemia (P = .021 for median hemoglobin; P = .028 for anemia <11 g/dL), platelet count (P = .041 for median platelet count), splenomegaly (P = .013), initial management plan (P = .012 for observation; P = .0021 for treatment with chemotherapy), and TTT (P = .0033). No statistically significant difference was seen among the MBL, 5 to 10, and more than 10 CLL Rai stage 0 groups regarding TTT and 10-year overall survival. Findings suggest that patients with B-cell counts of 5 to 10 × 10(9)/L behave clinically more similar to patients with B-cell counts of less than 5 × 10(9)/L. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2015 · American Journal of Clinical Pathology
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    ABSTRACT: T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a rare aggressive mature T-cell leukemia with frequent cutaneous presentation, which has not been well characterized. Among the 25 T-PLLs diagnosed between 1990 and 2013 at our institution, 32% (8/25) showed cutaneous manifestations, presenting as rash, purpura, papules, and ulcers. The skin biopsies showed leukemia cutis with perivascular and periadnexal irregular, small to medium-sized lymphoid infiltrates without epidermotropism. The lymphoid infiltrates were composed of mature CD4 T cells expressing other T-cell antigens, and a subset (48%) showed dual CD4/CD8 coexpression. Higher median absolute peripheral blood lymphocyte count (43.0 vs. 13.0k/mm; P=0.031) and elevated lactate dehydrogenase levels (P=0.00018) at the time of diagnosis were significantly associated with T-PLLs with skin involvement compared with those without. The extent of bone marrow involvement (P=0.849) and overall survival (P=0.144) was similar in the 2 groups. Fluorescence in situ hybridization or karyotype revealed frequent gains of MYC (67%; n=9), loss of ATM (64%; n=11), and TCL1A rearrangement or inversion 14q (75%; n=12). Gains of TCL1A was also seen (78%; n=9), including in some cases that had concurrent TCL1A rearrangement, whereas TP53 loss was less common (30%; n=10). No correlation was seen between the immunophenotype and morphology versus the presence or absence of skin involvement. These data suggest that cutaneous involvement by T-PLL is relatively common and often associated with significant peripheral blood involvement. The frequent MYC, ATM, and TCL1A alterations identified support that these genes are integral to the pathogenesis of T-PLL.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · American Journal of Surgical Pathology
  • Andy His · TuDung Nguyen · John Frater · Anjum Hassan · Friederike Kreisel

    No preview · Conference Paper · Oct 2014
  • Xiangdong Xu · Friederike H Kreisel · John L Frater · Anjum Hassan
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    ABSTRACT: Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is a rare and aggressive form of systemic mastocytosis. There are approximately 50 reported cases since 1950s. MCL is refractory to cytoreduction chemotherapy and the average survival is only six months. We report a MCL case in a 71 year-old woman with high tumor load at the initial presentation in 2005, who did not respond to either interleukin-2 or dasatinib therapy. After enrolled in a clinical trial of PKC412 (or Midostaurin) with a daily dose of 100 mg, the patient responded well to PKC412 and became transfusion independent in three months. Since then, her disease had been stably controlled. This is the first report of a high-tumor-load MCL case which achieved prolonged survival (101 months) by PKC 412. The 101-month overall survival is the longest among reported MCL cases in the English literature.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · International journal of clinical and experimental pathology
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: In recent years, research has increasingly focused on the microenvironment of classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) as a predictor of treatment outcome. The focus of this study was to assess the interobserver reproducibility in interpreting macrophage-associated immunohistochemistry (IHC) for CD68 and CD163 in a retrospective cohort of 88 patients with CHL. Methods: Staining results were correlated with clinical outcome in all patients and those with a high international prognostic score (IPS). Results: The intraclass correlation (ICC) for the five hematopathologists interpreting the IHC was stronger for CD163 (0.70) than for CD68 (0.50). Using a cutoff of 25% mean macrophage reactivity and including all patients, a statistically significant difference in overall survival (OS) was seen only for CD163 (P = .0006) and not for CD68 (P = .414). Patients with a mean CD163 reactivity of 25% or more had a median OS of 71 months vs 101 months for patients with less than 25% reactivity. CD163 retained statistical significance in multivariate analysis. In patients with advanced-stage CHL with high IPS, OS was also significantly worse for those with a mean CD163 reactivity of 25% or higher. Conclusions: Our study confirms previous reports of a prognostic role of tumor-infiltrating macrophages in CHL, but only for CD163. Although most of the literature supports an increasing role of macrophage IHC as a predictor of clinical outcome, successful clinical translation will require a standardized method and reporting system.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2014 · American Journal of Clinical Pathology
  • Andy C Hsi · Friederike H Kreisel · John L Frater · Tudung T Nguyen
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    ABSTRACT: Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). Published series of ATLLs seen at a United States medical institution are rare. We present the features of 4 ATLLs diagnosed at our North American tertiary care medical center from 1990 to 2012. Despite the absence of a history of origin from an endemic region, all our ATLLs demonstrated evidence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection. Central nervous system (CNS) involvement by ATLL was uncommon in our series, and represented only 1.6% (1/64) of all CNS B-cell or T-cell lymphomas diagnosed over a 20+ year period at our institution. Review of the medical literature reveals that the majority of CNS-involved ATLLs present with the lymphoma or acute subtype, and complete remission is difficult to achieve in these cases. CNS involvement frequently occurs with a systemic disease, which carries an aggressive clinical course with poor prognosis. In addition, CNS involvement by ATLL can be the initial presentation or seen with relapsed disease, can be the only site or be associated with other tissue sites of involvement, and may manifest with variable clinical signs/symptoms. Our retrospective study reveals that ATLLs are rare mature T-cell lymphomas in a native North American population, but the clinical and histopathologic features of ATLLs from this nonendemic region are similar to those seen from other endemic regions. Early recognition of these rare ATLLs involving uncommon sites, such as the CNS, will help optimize treatment for these infrequent mature T-cell lymphomas.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2014 · The American journal of surgical pathology
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    ABSTRACT: Burkitt lymphoma (BL) is a rare, highly aggressive B-cell malignancy treated most successfully with brief-duration, high-intensity chemotherapeutic regimens. The benefit of the addition of rituximab to these regimens remains uncertain. We sought to examine the effectiveness of chemotherapy with and without rituximab in patients with BL. This study is a retrospective cohort study of all adult patients with BL diagnosed and treated with modern, dose-intense chemotherapeutic regimens from 1998-2008 at two tertiary care institutions. All cases were confirmed by application of WHO 2008 criteria by hematopathologists. Medical records were reviewed for patient-, disease-, and treatment- related factors as well as treatment response and survival. Factors associated with survival were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards modeling. A total of 35 patients were analyzed: 18 patients received rituximab with chemotherapy (R-chemo) and 17 received chemotherapy (chemo) alone. The median age was 42 (range 20-74 years); 57% were male; 71% had Ann Arbor Stage IV disease; 33% had central nervous system involvement; 78% had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0-1. R-chemo was associated with significantly longer overall survival (OS) than chemo alone (5-year OS 70% and 29%, respectively, p = 0.040). On multivariate regression analysis, poor performance status and central nervous system involvement were associated with poorer survival. The addition of rituximab to chemotherapy was associated with improved OS in patients with Burkitt lymphoma. Poor performance status and central nervous system involvement were prognostically significant on multivariate analysis.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Context.-Experiences at our institution show that flow cytometry analysis (FCA) has become routine clinical practice in the workup of patients with altered mental status, even if risk factors are low. Objective.-To assess diagnostic accuracy of combined FCA and cytology in the diagnosis of central nervous system lymphoma in an unselected patient population with neurologic symptoms, including patients with no history of lymphoma or suspicious radiology. Design.-Between 2001 and 2011, cerebrospinal fluid was submitted from 373 patients for lymphoma screening by FCA. The medical records were reviewed for patient symptomatology, history of malignancy, brain imaging, FCA results, cytology results, brain biopsy, and clinical follow-up. Results.-A lymphoid malignancy was detected by FCA in 4% of cases. A positive diagnosis was more likely in patients with either a history of hematologic malignancy and/or a suspicious radiology result (P = .009). All patients with no history of lymphoma and no suspicious radiology (n = 102) had negative cytology, and none had a correspondingly positive FCA result. The positive and negative predictive values of combined cytology and FCA in the patients with history of lymphoma and/or abnormal imaging results were 92% and 89%, respectively, when compared with open brain tissue biopsy, and 89% and 86%, respectively, when compared with clinical follow-up. When low-risk patients were included, the positive predictive value remained at 92%, but the negative predictive value dropped to 52% with the open brain biopsy as the reference, and values did not change significantly for the group with clinical follow-up. Conclusions.-Concurrent FCA and cytology are most useful in the appropriate clinical setting, and we propose a triage algorithm for how FCA on cerebrospinal fluid is best used.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2013 · Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine
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    ABSTRACT: We present the case of a 30 year-old man who was referred for evaluation of diffuse lymphadenopathy. Six weeks prior, he noticed darkening of his urine associated with pale stools, nausea and an eventual 30 lb weight loss within a month. The initial laboratory findings showed elevation of the liver enzymes. A CT scan showed mesenteric and periaortic lymphadenopathy with the largest lymph node measuring 2.8 cm. Other laboratory results were otherwise unremarkable (including a normal LDH) with the exception of positive serum antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated antigens (IgM+ and IgG+). An excisional biopsy of 4 of the small neck lymph nodes showed a normal architecture with prominent follicles and an intact capsule. But, by immunohistochemistry two of the follicles showed aberrant coexpression of BCL-2, in addition to CD10 and BCL-6. In-situ hybridization for early Epstein-Barr virus mRNA (EBER) and immunohistochemistry for latent membrane protein-1 (LMP-1) stained both scattered positive cells, as well as BCL-2 positive B-cells. Although an original diagnosis of in-situ follicular lymphoma was favored at an outside facility, additional interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) studies for t(14;18);(IGH-BCL2) rearrangement (performed on the BCL-2 + follicles microdissected from the tissue block; Abott probe dual colour fusion) and molecular studies (IGH gene rearrangement by PCR, also performed on the microdissected follicles) were negative. Serologic studies (positive EBV antibodies) and immunostains in conjunction with the molecular studies confirmed the reactive nature of the changes. Our case also shows direct immunopathogenic evidence of BCL-2 expression among the EBV-infected cells, which has to our knowledge not been previously documented in vivo. A diagnosis of EBV infection should, therefore, be considered when confronted with BCL-2 expression in germinal centers, particularly in younger individuals, as the diagnosis of FLIS may lead to extensive and invasive haematologic work-ups. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1323656318940068
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2013 · Diagnostic Pathology
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    Tudung T Nguyen · Friederike H Kreisel · John L Frater · Nancy L Bartlett

    Preview · Article · Jun 2013 · Journal of Clinical Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Unlabelled: This first study in humans was designed to evaluate the safety and dosimetry of a cellular proliferative marker, N-(4-(6,7-dimethoxy-3,4-dihydroisoquinolin-2(1H)-yl)butyl)-2-(2-(18)F-fluoroethoxy)-5-methylbenzamide ((18)F-ISO-1), and evaluate the feasibility of imaging tumor proliferation by PET in patients with newly diagnosed malignant neoplasms. Methods: Patients with biopsy-proven lymphoma, breast cancer, or head and neck cancer underwent (18)F-ISO-1 PET. Tumor (18)F-ISO-1 uptake was assessed semiquantitatively by maximum standardized uptake value, ratios of tumor to normal tissue and tumor to muscle, and relative distribution volume ratio. The PET results were correlated with tumor Ki-67 and mitotic index, from in vitro assays of the tumor tissue. The biodistribution of (18)F-ISO-1 and human dosimetry were evaluated. Results: Thirty patients with primary breast cancer (n = 13), head and neck cancer (n = 10), and lymphoma (n = 7) were evaluated. In the entire group, tumor maximum standardized uptake value and tumor-to-muscle ratio correlated significantly with Ki-67 (τ = 0.27, P = 0.04, and τ = 0.38, P = 0.003, respectively), but no significant correlation was observed between Ki-67 and tumor-to-normal-tissue ratio (τ = 0.07, P = 0.56) or distribution volume ratio (τ = 0.26, P = 0.14). On the basis of whole-body PET data, the gallbladder is the dose-limiting organ, with an average radiation dose of 0.091 mGy/MBq. The whole-body and effective doses were 0.012 mGy/MBq and 0.016 mSv/MBq, respectively. No adverse effects of (18)F-ISO-1 were encountered. Conclusion: The presence of a significant correlation between (18)F-ISO-1 and Ki-67 makes this agent promising for evaluation of the proliferative status of solid tumors. The relatively small absorbed doses to normal organs allow for the safe administration of up to 550 MBq, which is sufficient for PET imaging in clinical trials.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2013 · Journal of Nuclear Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: We conducted a retrospective study of patients with cutaneous myeloid sarcoma, from 2 tertiary care institutions. Eighty-three patients presented, with a mean age of 52 years. Diagnosis of myeloid sarcoma in the skin was difficult due to the low frequency of myeloperoxidase and/or CD34+ cases (56% and 19% of tested cases, respectively). Seventy-one of the 83 patients (86%) had ≥ 1 bone marrow biopsy. Twenty-eight (39%) had acute myeloid leukemia with monocytic differentiation. Twenty-three had other de novo acute myeloid leukemia subtypes. Thirteen patients had other myeloid neoplasms, of which 4 ultimately progressed to an acute myeloid leukemia. Seven had no bone marrow malignancy. Ninety-eight percent of the patients received chemotherapy, and approximately 89% died of causes related to their disease. Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma in most cases represents an aggressive manifestation of acute myeloid leukemia. Diagnosis can be challenging due to lack of myeloblast-associated antigen expression in many cases, and difficulty in distinguishing monocyte-lineage blasts from neoplastic and non-neoplastic mature monocytes.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2012 · Acta Dermato-Venereologica
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    ABSTRACT: BackgroundGastrointestinal (GI) lymphomas are very common types of extranodal lymphomas, and we hypothesize there are regional differences in subtype, distribution in the GI tract, and epidemiological features among the different populations.MethodsWe retrospectively evaluated the clinical, molecular and histologic features of North American primary and secondary GI lymphomas diagnosed from 2000–2009 seen at our institution. We utilized immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization to further evaluate a subset of the gastric lymphomas.ResultsExtranodal marginal zone lymphomas of mucosal associated lymphoid tissue (MALTs) and diffuse large B cell lymphomas (DLBCLs) were the most common subtypes of GI lymphomas. Select gastric DLBCLs (N = 6) and MALTs (N = 13) were further examined for API2-MALT1 and IGH translocations, and P16 and P53 protein expression. Gastric MALTs showed frequent API2-MALT1 (38%) but not IGH translocations (0%), and the DLBCLs showed neither translocation. Expression of P16 and P53 proteins and the proliferative index were compared between high grade gastric lymphomas (gastric DLBCLs) and low grade gastric lymphomas (gastric MALTs). P53 overexpression (P = 0.008) and a high proliferation index [Ki-67] (P = 0.00042) were significantly associated with gastric DLBCL, but no statistically significant difference was observed in P16 expression (p = 0.108) between gastric DLBCL and gastric MALT.ConclusionOur study revealed that GI lymphomas from a Central-Midwestern North American population showed differences and similarities to non-North American cohorts. In addition, API2-MALT1, P16 and P53 abnormalities occurred frequently in gastric lymphomas from this North American population.Virtual slidesThe virtual slides for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/1415505838687793
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2012 · Diagnostic Pathology
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    ABSTRACT: Bone marrow involvement by a histiocytic lesion may result in a broad differential diagnosis. Erdheim-Chester disease is a rare aggressive histiocytic proliferation with systemic involvement that frequently causes bone lesions with a characteristic radiographic and clinical presentation. Most patients have bilateral and symmetric sclerotic bone lesions especially involving the long bones of the lower limbs. Extraskeletal involvement of the hypothalamus/posterior pituitary, central nervous system, orbit, retroperitoneum, skin, lung, kidney, and heart can be seen in half of the cases. Here we report a case of Erdheim-Chester disease, and the clinicopathologic features and the differential diagnosis are discussed. The presented example illustrates the importance of a systematic approach in the evaluation of bone marrow histiocytic lesions.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2012 · Pathology Case Reviews
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    ABSTRACT: Cutaneous myeloid sarcoma is often challenging to diagnose based solely upon histopathological features. Although immunohistochemistry can aid in its diagnosis, specific markers have not been clearly identified. We evaluated the utility of immunohistochemical markers in 57 cutaneous myeloid sarcoma cases. In addition to classical markers (CD117, CD163, CD34, myeloperoxidase and lysozyme), we used CD33 and CD14, recently described markers in paraffin-embedded tissue samples, and Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF-4), a novel monocytic marker. Our results show that lysozyme was expressed in 91%, CD33 in 60%, myeloperoxidase in 54%, CD34 in 39% and CD117 in 36% of cases. An antibody panel that included lysozyme, CD117 and CD33 identified all cases. The monocytic markers CD14, KLF-4 and CD163 were expressed in 60, 58 and 40% of all cases, respectively. CD14 and KLF-4 expression was significantly more common in cases with monocytic differentiation. CD14 is the single most sensitive and specific marker for monocytic differentiation (79 and 80%). Although KLF-4 in isolation is relatively insensitive (50 and 87%), it enhances sensitivity in detecting monocytic cutaneous myeloid sarcoma when combined with CD14. Our results indicate that in addition to classical immunohistochemical markers, targeted use of newer antibodies, including CD33, CD14 and KLF-4 is useful in the diagnosis of cutaneous myeloid sarcoma and in the detection of monocytic differentiation. Amador-Ortiz C, Hurley MY, Ghahramani GK, Frisch S, Klco JM, Lind AC, Nguyen TT, Hassan A, Kreisel FH, Frater JL. Use of classic and novel immunohistochemical markers in the diagnosis of cutaneous myeloid sarcoma.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2011 · Journal of Cutaneous Pathology
  • Mohammad Hussaini · Friederike Kreisel · Anjum Hassan
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    ABSTRACT: Firstly, increased Ki67 and MUM-1 staining has been associated with worse prognosis in marginal zone B cell lymphomas (MZL). However, ours is the first study to assess the impact of proliferative indices on chemotherapy response. Secondly, loss of p53 and p16 tumor suppressor genes (TSG) has traditionally been associated with cancer progression. The significance of these markers in MZL was investigated. Thirdly, we explored the role of proliferative indices and tumor suppressor genes in identifying MZLs with significant plasmacytic differentiation (PD). Consecutive MZL cases (2006–2008) were identified. Slides were reviewed to confirm the diagnosis; immunohistochemical stains for Ki67, MUM-1, WT-1, p53, and p16 were subsequently performed and graded for percentage staining. Wilcoxon two-sample test and Pearson correlation coefficient were performed. Twenty-nine cases were analyzed. None of the assayed markers were correlated with treatment response. Ki67 and MUM1 expression, however, were correlated with PD (p = 0.0136 and p = 0.0042). A correlation between MUM1 and p16 staining was also seen (p = 0.0006). IHC assay for TSGs, p53 and p16, and proliferative indices (Ki67, MUM1, WT1) is unlikely to predict treatment response in low-grade MZL. Ki67 and MUM1 staining, however, may serve as a useful adjunct in ascribing PD.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2011 · Comparative Clinical Pathology

  • No preview · Article · Jul 2011 · Journal of clinical pathology