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Publications (4)42.25 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) affects 8 to 16% people worldwide, with an increasing incidence and prevalence of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). The effective management of CKD is confounded by the inability to identify patients at high risk of progression while in early stages of CKD. To address this challenge, a renal biopsy transcriptome-driven approach was applied to develop noninvasive prognostic biomarkers for CKD progression. Expression of intrarenal transcripts was correlated with the baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in 261 patients. Proteins encoded by eGFR-associated transcripts were tested in urine for association with renal tissue injury and baseline eGFR. The ability to predict CKD progression, defined as the composite of ESKD or 40% reduction of baseline eGFR, was then determined in three independent CKD cohorts. A panel of intrarenal transcripts, including epidermal growth factor (EGF), a tubule-specific protein critical for cell differentiation and regeneration, predicted eGFR. The amount of EGF protein in urine (uEGF) showed significant correlation (P < 0.001) with intrarenal EGF mRNA, interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy, eGFR, and rate of eGFR loss. Prediction of the composite renal end point by age, gender, eGFR, and albuminuria was significantly (P < 0.001) improved by addition of uEGF, with an increase of the C-statistic from 0.75 to 0.87. Outcome predictions were replicated in two independent CKD cohorts. Our approach identified uEGF as an independent risk predictor of CKD progression. Addition of uEGF to standard clinical parameters improved the prediction of disease events in diverse CKD populations with a wide spectrum of causes and stages.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Science translational medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Animal data suggest that natriuretic peptides play an important role in energy metabolism, but prospective studies evaluating a relationship between these peptides and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in humans are few and results are conflicting. Methods: We used a prospective case-cohort approach (n = 491 T2DM cases, n = 561 reference subcohort) within the Women's Health Study to evaluate baseline N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentrations and the risk of incident T2DM. We also tested for associations between 4 common variants in the natriuretic peptide A and B genes (NPPA and NPPB) and NT-proBNP concentrations (n = 458) and incident T2DM (n = 1372 cases among 22 607 women). Results: Case subjects had higher median baseline body mass index (29.4 vs 25.0 kg/m(2), P < 0.001) and lower baseline median (interquartile range) NT-proBNP concentrations [46.8 ng/L (26.1-83.2) vs 66.7 ng/L (39.3-124.7), P < 0.001]. In proportional hazards models adjusting for established diabetes risk factors, women in the highest quartile of baseline NT-proBNP concentration (≥ 117.4 ng/L) had a 49% reduction in risk of T2DM [hazard ratio (HR) 0.51, 0.30-0.86, P = 0.01] relative to those in the lowest quartile. Two of the 4 tested variants in NPPA and NPPB (rs632793, rs198389) were associated with increased NT-proBNP concentrations and reduced risk of T2DM. For example, each copy of the minor allele of rs632793 was associated with increased NT-proBNP [β (SE) = 0.201 (0.063), P < 0.01] and decreased T2DM risk (HR 0.91, 0.84-0.989, P = 0.026). Conclusions: NT-proBNP concentrations that are high, but still within the reference interval, associate with reduced risk of incident diabetes in women and support a favorable role for natriuretic peptides in the prevention of T2DM.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2013 · Clinical Chemistry
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    ABSTRACT: Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) is a stress-responsive cytokine that is increased in obesity and established type 2 diabetes. We assessed whether GDF-15 can predict future insulin resistance and impaired glucose control in obese nondiabetic individuals. Plasma GDF-15 concentrations were measured with an automated electrochemiluminescent immunoassay at baseline and after 4 years in 496 obese nondiabetic individuals (52% men, median age 48 years, median body mass index (BMI) 37.6 kg/m(2)) enrolled in the XENical in the prevention of Diabetes in Obese subjects (XENDOS) trial. THE MEDIAN GDF-15 CONCENTRATION AT BASELINE WAS 869NG/L (INTERQUARTILE RANGE 7231064NG/L). GDF-15 WAS RELATED TO BODY WEIGHT, BMI, WAIST-TO-HIP RATIO, AND INSULIN RESISTANCE (HOMEOSTASIS MODEL ASSESSMENT OF INSULIN RESISTANCE (HOMA-IR)) (ALL P0.01). CHANGES IN GDF-15 FROM BASELINE TO 4 YEARS WERE RELATED TO CHANGES IN BODY WEIGHT, BMI, WAIST-TO-HIP RATIO, AND HOMA-IR (ALL P0.05). BASELINE GDF-15 WAS ASSOCIATED WITH THE RISK TO HAVE PREDIABETES OR DIABETES AT 4 YEARS BY UNIVARIATE ANALYSIS (ODDS RATIO (OR) FOR 1 UNIT INCREASE IN LN GDF-15, 3.2; 95% CONFIDENCE INTERVAL (CI): 1.7-6.1; P<0.001), and after multivariate adjustment for age, gender, treatment allocation (orlistat vs placebo), BMI, waist-to-hip ratio, and glucose control at baseline (OR 2.2; 95% CI: 1.1-4.7; P=0.026). Similarly, baseline GDF-15 was independently associated with HOMA-IR at 4 years (P=0.024). This first longitudinal study of GDF-15 in a large cohort of obese individuals indicates that GDF-15 is related to abdominal obesity and insulin resistance and independently associated with future insulin resistance and abnormal glucose control.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2012 · European Journal of Endocrinology
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    ABSTRACT: Very low levels of cardiac troponin T are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular death in patients with stable chronic coronary disease. Whether high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T levels are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in individuals without cardiovascular disease (CVD) has not been well studied. Using 2 complementary study designs, we evaluated the relationship between baseline cardiac troponin and incident CVD events among diabetic and nondiabetic participants in the Women's Health Study (median follow-up, 12.3 years). All diabetic women with blood specimens were included in a cohort study (n=512 diabetic women, n=65 events), and nondiabetic women were sampled for inclusion in a case-cohort analysis (n=564 comprising the subcohort, n=479 events). High-sensitivity cardiac troponin T was detectable (≥ 0.003 μg/L) in 45.5% of diabetic women and 30.3% of nondiabetic women (P<0.0001). In models adjusted for traditional risk factors and hemoglobin A(1c), detectable high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T was associated with subsequent CVD (myocardial infarction, stroke, cardiovascular death) in diabetic women (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.79; 95% confidence interval, 1.04 to 3.07, P=0.036) but not nondiabetic women (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 1.55; P=0.46). Further adjustment for amino-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and estimated renal function did not substantially alter this relationship among diabetic women (hazard ratio, 1.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.00 to 3.08; P=0.0499), which appeared to be driven by a 3-fold increase in CVD death that was not observed in nondiabetic women. Very low but detectable levels of cardiac troponin T are associated with total CVD and CVD death in women with diabetes mellitus. Among healthy nondiabetic women, detectable compared with undetectable troponin was not associated with CVD events.
    Preview · Article · Jun 2011 · Circulation