Kjetil Søreide

University of Bergen, Bergen, Hordaland, Norway

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Publications (192)831.1 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) are rare, yet the most common mesenchymal tumour within the digestive tract. Lack of diagnostic criteria and no specific code in the ICD system has prevented epidemiological evaluation except from overt malignant cases in the past. A global estimate of incidence and disease patterns has thus not been available. Methods: A systematic literature search of all available population-based studies on GIST published between January 2000 and December 2014 were reviewed. Descriptive epidemiological data are presented. Results: The search found 29 studies of more than 13,550 patients from 19 countries that reported sufficient data for regional or national population-based statistics. Age at diagnosis ranged from 10 to 100 years, with median age being mid 60s across most studies. Gender distribution was equal across studies. On average, 18% of patients had an incidental diagnosis (range from 5% to 40%). Anatomical location of primary tumour in 9747 GISTs demonstrated gastric location as the most frequent (55.6%) followed by small bowel (31.8%), colorectal (6.0%), other/various location (5.5%) and oesophagus (0.7%). Most studies reported incidence at 10-15 per million per year. Notably, lowest incidence was in China (Shanxi province) with 4.3 per million per year. Highest incidence rates were reported also from China (Hong Kong and Shanghai areas), and in Taiwan and Norway (Northern part), with up to 19-22 per million per year. Conclusions: Epidemiology of GIST demonstrates some consistent features across geographical regions. Whether the reported extreme differences in incidence reflect real variation in population risk warrants further investigation.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016
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    ABSTRACT: This appendix provides further methodological detail, supplemental figures and more detailed results for the comparative risk assessment.
    Full-text · Dataset · Dec 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Background The Global Burden of Disease, Injuries, and Risk Factor study 2013 (GBD 2013) is the first of a series of annual updates of the GBD. Risk factor quantification, particularly of modifiable risk factors, can help to identify emerging threats to population health and opportunities for prevention. The GBD 2013 provides a timely opportunity to update the comparative risk assessment with new data for exposure, relative risks, and evidence on the appropriate counterfactual risk distribution. Methods Attributable deaths, years of life lost, years lived with disability, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) have been estimated for 79 risks or clusters of risks using the GBD 2010 methods. Risk–outcome pairs meeting explicit evidence criteria were assessed for 188 countries for the period 1990–2013 by age and sex using three inputs: risk exposure, relative risks, and the theoretical minimum risk exposure level (TMREL). Risks are organised into a hierarchy with blocks of behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks at the first level of the hierarchy. The next level in the hierarchy includes nine clusters of related risks and two individual risks, with more detail provided at levels 3 and 4 of the hierarchy. Compared with GBD 2010, six new risk factors have been added: handwashing practices, occupational exposure to trichloroethylene, childhood wasting, childhood stunting, unsafe sex, and low glomerular filtration rate. For most risks, data for exposure were synthesised with a Bayesian meta-regression method, DisMod-MR 2.0, or spatial-temporal Gaussian process regression. Relative risks were based on meta-regressions of published cohort and intervention studies. Attributable burden for clusters of risks and all risks combined took into account evidence on the mediation of some risks such as high body-mass index (BMI) through other risks such as high systolic blood pressure and high cholesterol. Findings All risks combined account for 57·2% (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 55·8–58·5) of deaths and 41·6% (40·1–43·0) of DALYs. Risks quantified account for 87·9% (86·5–89·3) of cardiovascular disease DALYs, ranging to a low of 0% for neonatal disorders and neglected tropical diseases and malaria. In terms of global DALYs in 2013, six risks or clusters of risks each caused more than 5% of DALYs: dietary risks accounting for 11·3 million deaths and 241·4 million DALYs, high systolic blood pressure for 10·4 million deaths and 208·1 million DALYs, child and maternal malnutrition for 1·7 million deaths and 176·9 million DALYs, tobacco smoke for 6·1 million deaths and 143·5 million DALYs, air pollution for 5·5 million deaths and 141·5 million DALYs, and high BMI for 4·4 million deaths and 134·0 million DALYs. Risk factor patterns vary across regions and countries and with time. In sub-Saharan Africa, the leading risk factors are child and maternal malnutrition, unsafe sex, and unsafe water, sanitation, and handwashing. In women, in nearly all countries in the Americas, north Africa, and the Middle East, and in many other high-income countries, high BMI is the leading risk factor, with high systolic blood pressure as the leading risk in most of Central and Eastern Europe and south and east Asia. For men, high systolic blood pressure or tobacco use are the leading risks in nearly all high-income countries, in north Africa and the Middle East, Europe, and Asia. For men and women, unsafe sex is the leading risk in a corridor from Kenya to South Africa. Interpretation Behavioural, environmental and occupational, and metabolic risks can explain half of global mortality and more than one-third of global DALYs providing many opportunities for prevention. Of the larger risks, the attributable burden of high BMI has increased in the past 23 years. In view of the prominence of behavioural risk factors, behavioural and social science research on interventions for these risks should be strengthened. Many prevention and primary care policy options are available now to act on key risks.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · The Lancet
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The Global Burden of Diseases (GBD), Injuries, and Risk Factors study used the disability-adjusted life year (DALY) to quantify the burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors. This paper provides an overview of injury estimates from the 2013 update of GBD, with detailed information on incidence, mortality, DALYs and rates of change from 1990 to 2013 for 26 causes of injury, globally, by region and by country. Methods: Injury mortality was estimated using the extensive GBD mortality database, corrections for ill-defined cause of death and the cause of death ensemble modelling tool. Morbidity estimation was based on inpatient and outpatient data sets, 26 cause-of-injury and 47 nature-of-injury categories, and seven follow-up studies with patient-reported long-term outcome measures. Results: In 2013, 973 million (uncertainty interval (UI) 942 to 993) people sustained injuries that warranted some type of healthcare and 4.8 million (UI 4.5 to 5.1) people died from injuries. Between 1990 and 2013 the global age-standardised injury DALY rate decreased by 31% (UI 26% to 35%). The rate of decline in DALY rates was significant for 22 cause-of-injury categories, including all the major injuries. Conclusions: Injuries continue to be an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed and developing world. The decline in rates for almost all injuries is so prominent that it warrants a general statement that the world is becoming a safer place to live in. However, the patterns vary widely by cause, age, sex, region and time and there are still large improvements that need to be made.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Injury Prevention
  • K F Desserud · T Veen · K Søreide
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Emergency general surgery in the elderly is a particular challenge to the surgeon in charge of their care. The aim was to review contemporary aspects of managing elderly patients needing emergency general surgery and possible alterations to their pathways of care. Methods: This was a narrative review based on a PubMed/MEDLINE literature search up until 15 September 2015 for publications relevant to emergency general surgery in the geriatric patient. Results: The number of patients presenting as an emergency with a general surgical condition increases with age. Up to one-quarter of all emergency admissions to hospital may be for general surgical conditions. Elderly patients are a particular challenge owing to added co-morbidity, use of drugs and risk of poor outcome. Frailty is an important potential risk factor, but difficult to monitor or manage in the emergency setting. Risk scores are not available universally. Outcomes are usually severalfold worse than after elective surgery, in terms of both higher morbidity and increased mortality. A care bundle including early diagnosis, resuscitation and organ system monitoring may benefit the elderly in particular. Communication with the patient and relatives throughout the care pathway is essential, as indications for surgery, level of care and likely outcomes may evolve. Ethical issues should also be addressed at every step on the pathway of care. Conclusion: Emergency general surgery in the geriatric patient needs a tailored approach to improve outcomes and avoid futile care. Although some high-quality studies exist in related fields, the overall evidence base informing perioperative acute care for the elderly remains limited.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · British Journal of Surgery
  • K. Søreide

    No preview · Article · Dec 2015
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    Kjetil Søreide

    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Scandinavian Journal of Trauma Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
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    Kjetil Søreide

    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Scandinavian Journal of Trauma Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: This appendix provides two supplementary figures and ten supplementary tables.
    Full-text · Dataset · Nov 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013) aims to bring together all available epidemiological data using a coherent measurement framework, standardised estimation methods, and transparent data sources to enable comparisons of health loss over time and across causes, age-sex groups, and countries. The GBD can be used to generate summary measures such as disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) and healthy life expectancy (HALE) that make possible comparative assessments of broad epidemiological patterns across countries and time. These summary measures can also be used to quantify the component of variation in epidemiology that is related to sociodemographic development. We used the published GBD 2013 data for age-specific mortality, years of life lost due to premature mortality (YLLs), and years lived with disability (YLDs) to calculate DALYs and HALE for 1990, 1995, 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2013 for 188 countries. We calculated HALE using the Sullivan method; 95% uncertainty intervals (UIs) represent uncertainty in age-specific death rates and YLDs per person for each country, age, sex, and year. We estimated DALYs for 306 causes for each country as the sum of YLLs and YLDs; 95% UIs represent uncertainty in YLL and YLD rates. We quantified patterns of the epidemiological transition with a composite indicator of sociodemographic status, which we constructed from income per person, average years of schooling after age 15 years, and the total fertility rate and mean age of the population. We applied hierarchical regression to DALY rates by cause across countries to decompose variance related to the sociodemographic status variable, country, and time. Worldwide, from 1990 to 2013, life expectancy at birth rose by 6·2 years (95% UI 5·6-6·6), from 65·3 years (65·0-65·6) in 1990 to 71·5 years (71·0-71·9) in 2013, HALE at birth rose by 5·4 years (4·9-5·8), from 56·9 years (54·5-59·1) to 62·3 years (59·7-64·8), total DALYs fell by 3·6% (0·3-7·4), and age-standardised DALY rates per 100 000 people fell by 26·7% (24·6-29·1). For communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional disorders, global DALY numbers, crude rates, and age-standardised rates have all declined between 1990 and 2013, whereas for non-communicable diseases, global DALYs have been increasing, DALY rates have remained nearly constant, and age-standardised DALY rates declined during the same period. From 2005 to 2013, the number of DALYs increased for most specific non-communicable diseases, including cardiovascular diseases and neoplasms, in addition to dengue, food-borne trematodes, and leishmaniasis; DALYs decreased for nearly all other causes. By 2013, the five leading causes of DALYs were ischaemic heart disease, lower respiratory infections, cerebrovascular disease, low back and neck pain, and road injuries. Sociodemographic status explained more than 50% of the variance between countries and over time for diarrhoea, lower respiratory infections, and other common infectious diseases; maternal disorders; neonatal disorders; nutritional deficiencies; other communicable, maternal, neonatal, and nutritional diseases; musculoskeletal disorders; and other non-communicable diseases. However, sociodemographic status explained less than 10% of the variance in DALY rates for cardiovascular diseases; chronic respiratory diseases; cirrhosis; diabetes, urogenital, blood, and endocrine diseases; unintentional injuries; and self-harm and interpersonal violence. Predictably, increased sociodemographic status was associated with a shift in burden from YLLs to YLDs, driven by declines in YLLs and increases in YLDs from musculoskeletal disorders, neurological disorders, and mental and substance use disorders. In most country-specific estimates, the increase in life expectancy was greater than that in HALE. Leading causes of DALYs are highly variable across countries. Global health is improving. Population growth and ageing have driven up numbers of DALYs, but crude rates have remained relatively constant, showing that progress in health does not mean fewer demands on health systems. The notion of an epidemiological transition-in which increasing sociodemographic status brings structured change in disease burden-is useful, but there is tremendous variation in burden of disease that is not associated with sociodemographic status. This further underscores the need for country-specific assessments of DALYs and HALE to appropriately inform health policy decisions and attendant actions. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · The Lancet
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    ABSTRACT: Background Diverticular Inflammation and Complication Assessment (DICA) endoscopic classification has been recently developed for patients suffering from diverticulosis and diverticular disease.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · United European Gastroenterology Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The lack of uniform criteria for coding of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasia (GEP-NEN) has hampered previous epidemiological studies. The epidemiology of GEP-NEN was investigated in this study using currently available criteria. Methods: All patients diagnosed with GEP-NEN between January 2003 and December 2013 in a well defined Norwegian population of approximately 350 000 people were included. Age- and sex-adjusted incidence rates were calculated. The current 2010 World Health Organization criteria, European Neuroendocrine Tumour Society classification and International Union Against Cancer (UICC) classification were used. Results: A total of 204 patients (114 male, 55·9 per cent) were identified. The median age at diagnosis was 61 (range 10-94) years. The annual overall crude incidence was 5·83 per 100 000 inhabitants, with an increasing trend (P = 0·033). The most frequent location was small intestine (60 patients, 29·4 per cent) followed by appendix (48 patients, 23·5 per cent) and pancreas (33 patients, 16·2 per cent). Grade 1 tumours were more common in gastrointestinal (100 patients, 58·5 per cent) than in pancreatic (9 patients, 27 per cent) NEN. According to the UICC classification, 77 patients (37·7 per cent) had stage I, 17 patients (8·3 per cent) stage II, 37 patients (18·1 per cent) stage III and 70 patients (34·3 per cent) had stage IV disease. No patient with stage I disease had grade 3 tumours; advanced tumour grade increased with stage. Conclusion: A high crude incidence of GEP-NEN, at 5·83 per 100 000 inhabitants, was noted together with a significant increasing trend over time.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · British Journal of Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Perforated peptic ulcer is a common emergency condition worldwide, with associated mortality rates of up to 30%. A scarcity of high-quality studies about the condition limits the knowledge base for clinical decision making, but a few published randomised trials are available. Although Helicobacter pylori and use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes, demographic differences in age, sex, perforation location, and underlying causes exist between countries, and mortality rates also vary. Clinical prediction rules are used, but accuracy varies with study population. Early surgery, either by laparoscopic or open repair, and proper sepsis management are essential for good outcome. Selected patients can be managed non-operatively or with novel endoscopic approaches, but validation of such methods in trials is needed. Quality of care, sepsis care bundles, and postoperative monitoring need further assessment. Adequate trials with low risk of bias are urgently needed to provide better evidence. We summarise the evidence for perforated peptic ulcer management and identify directions for future clinical research.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · The Lancet
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    ABSTRACT: Acute appendicitis is one of the most common abdominal emergencies worldwide. The cause remains poorly understood, with few advances in the past few decades. To obtain a confident preoperative diagnosis is still a challenge, since the possibility of appendicitis must be entertained in any patient presenting with an acute abdomen. Although biomarkers and imaging are valuable adjuncts to history and examination, their limitations mean that clinical assessment is still the mainstay of diagnosis. A clinical classification is used to stratify management based on simple (non-perforated) and complex (gangrenous or perforated) inflammation, although many patients remain with an equivocal diagnosis, which is one of the most challenging dilemmas. An observed divide in disease course suggests that some cases of simple appendicitis might be self-limiting or respond to antibiotics alone, whereas another type often seems to perforate before the patient reaches hospital. Although the mortality rate is low, postoperative complications are common in complex disease. We discuss existing knowledge in pathogenesis, modern diagnosis, and evolving strategies in management that are leading to stratified care for patients.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · The Lancet
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    K Søreide
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    ABSTRACT: A plea for basic research
    Preview · Article · Sep 2015 · British Journal of Surgery
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    Full-text · Dataset · Aug 2015
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    Full-text · Dataset · Aug 2015
  • J K Narvestad · M Meskinfamfard · K Søreide
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    ABSTRACT: Emergency resuscitative thoracotomy (ERT) is a lifesaving procedure in selected patients. Indications are still being debated, but outcome in blunt trauma is believed to be poor. Recent reports from European populations, where blunt trauma predominates, have suggested favorable outcome also in blunt trauma. Our aim was to identify all European studies reported over the last decade and compare reported outcomes to existing knowledge. We performed a systematic literature search according to PRISMA guidelines (January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2014). The "grey literature" was included by searching Google Scholar. Qualitative comparison of studies and outcomes was done. A total of 8 articles from Europe were included originating from Croatia, Norway (n = 2), Denmark, Iceland, the Netherlands, Scotland, and Switzerland. Of 376 resuscitative thoracotomies, 193 (51.3 %) were for blunt trauma. Male:female distribution was 3.5:1. The collectively reported overall survival was 42.8 % (n = 161), with 25.4 % (49 of 193) blunt trauma and 61.2 % (112 of 183) penetrating injuries. When strictly including those ERTs designated as done in the emergency department for blunt mechanism (n = 139) only, a total of 18 patients survived (12.9 %). Survival after EDTs for penetrating trauma was 41.6 % (37 of 89). Neurological outcome (reported in 5 of 8 studies) reported favorable neurological long-term outcome in the majority of survivors, even after blunt trauma. None referred to Glasgow Outcome Score. Heterogeneity in the studies prevented outcome analyses by formal quantitative meta-analysis. The reported outcome after ERT in European civilian trauma populations is favorable, with one in every four ERTs in the ED surviving. Notably, outcome is at variance with previously reported collective data, in particular for blunt trauma. Multicenter, prospective, observational data are needed to validate the modern role of ERT in blunt trauma.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery
  • Jon K. Narvestad · Kjetil Søreide

    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Cancer is among the leading causes of death worldwide. Current estimates of cancer burden in individual countries and regions are necessary to inform local cancer control strategies. To estimate mortality, incidence, years lived with disability (YLDs), years of life lost (YLLs), and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 28 cancers in 188 countries by sex from 1990 to 2013. The general methodology of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2013 study was used. Cancer registries were the source for cancer incidence data as well as mortality incidence (MI) ratios. Sources for cause of death data include vital registration system data, verbal autopsy studies, and other sources. The MI ratios were used to transform incidence data to mortality estimates and cause of death estimates to incidence estimates. Cancer prevalence was estimated using MI ratios as surrogates for survival data; YLDs were calculated by multiplying prevalence estimates with disability weights, which were derived from population-based surveys; YLLs were computed by multiplying the number of estimated cancer deaths at each age with a reference life expectancy; and DALYs were calculated as the sum of YLDs and YLLs. In 2013 there were 14.9 million incident cancer cases, 8.2 million deaths, and 196.3 million DALYs. Prostate cancer was the leading cause for cancer incidence (1.4 million) for men and breast cancer for women (1.8 million). Tracheal, bronchus, and lung (TBL) cancer was the leading cause for cancer death in men and women, with 1.6 million deaths. For men, TBL cancer was the leading cause of DALYs (24.9 million). For women, breast cancer was the leading cause of DALYs (13.1 million). Age-standardized incidence rates (ASIRs) per 100 000 and age-standardized death rates (ASDRs) per 100 000 for both sexes in 2013 were higher in developing vs developed countries for stomach cancer (ASIR, 17 vs 14; ASDR, 15 vs 11), liver cancer (ASIR, 15 vs 7; ASDR, 16 vs 7), esophageal cancer (ASIR, 9 vs 4; ASDR, 9 vs 4), cervical cancer (ASIR, 8 vs 5; ASDR, 4 vs 2), lip and oral cavity cancer (ASIR, 7 vs 6; ASDR, 2 vs 2), and nasopharyngeal cancer (ASIR, 1.5 vs 0.4; ASDR, 1.2 vs 0.3). Between 1990 and 2013, ASIRs for all cancers combined (except nonmelanoma skin cancer and Kaposi sarcoma) increased by more than 10% in 113 countries and decreased by more than 10% in 12 of 188 countries. Cancer poses a major threat to public health worldwide, and incidence rates have increased in most countries since 1990. The trend is a particular threat to developing nations with health systems that are ill-equipped to deal with complex and expensive cancer treatments. The annual update on the Global Burden of Cancer will provide all stakeholders with timely estimates to guide policy efforts in cancer prevention, screening, treatment, and palliation.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · JAMA The Journal of the American Medical Association

Publication Stats

2k Citations
831.10 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007-2016
    • University of Bergen
      • • Department of Clinical Medicine
      • • Department of Surgical Sciences
      • • The Gade Institute
      Bergen, Hordaland, Norway
  • 2005-2015
    • Stavanger University Hospital
      • • Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery
      • • Division of Surgery
      Stavenger, Rogaland, Norway
  • 2010
    • University Hospital of North Norway
      • Department of Gastroenterological Surgery
      Tromsø, Troms, Norway
  • 2007-2009
    • University of Stavanger (UiS)
      Stavenger, Rogaland, Norway