Vanessa M. Patrick

University of Houston, Houston, Texas, United States

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Publications (45)62.37 Total impact

  • Vanessa M Patrick
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    ABSTRACT: This review introduces the notion of everyday consumer aesthetics. Everyday consumer aesthetics entails non-art, non-nature aesthetic experiences that are diverse and dynamic and result in specific consumer actions (e.g. purchasing) and consumption behaviors (e.g. recycling). Two broad trends observed in the recent literature are highlighted: a focus on the quantification of the use and impact of aesthetics, and, the study of specific new aesthetic features and their theoretical underpinnings. Recent insights and advances in consumer aesthetics research pertaining to elements of packaging, shape and surface appeal, color, dynamism and visual change, embodiment and individual differences are presented. Future research endeavors to expand the scope and impact of everyday aesthetics in consumer behavior are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2016
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    Nicole L Mead · Vanessa M Patrick
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    ABSTRACT: The present investigation began with the conjecture that people may do better by saying "some other time" instead of "no, not ever" in response to temptations. Drawing from learning theories, we hypothesized that people interpret unspecific postponement ("I can have it some other time") as a signal that they do not strongly value the postponed temptation. In this way, unspecific postponement may reduce desire for and consumption of postponed temptations, both in the present moment and over time. Four experiments tested those hypotheses. A multiphase study using the free-choice paradigm supported the learning account for the effects of postponement: Unspecific postponement reduced immediate desire for a self-selected temptation which in turn statistically accounted for diminished consumption during the week after the manipulation-but only when postponement was induced, not when it was imposed (Experiment 1). Supporting the hypothesis that unspecific but not specific postponement connotes weak valuation, only unspecific postponement reduced attention to (Experiment 2) and consumption of (Experiment 3) the postponed temptation. Additionally, unspecific postponement delayed consumption primarily among those who were highly motivated to forgo consumption of the temptation (Experiment 3). A final multiphase experiment compared the effectiveness of unspecific postponement to the classic self-control mechanism of restraint, finding that unspecific postponement (vs. restraint) reduced consumption of the temptation in the heat of the moment and across 1 week postmanipulation (Experiment 4). The current research provides novel insight into self-control facilitation, the modification of desire, and the differential effects of unspecific and specific intentions for reducing unwanted behavior.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
  • Candice R. Hollenbeck · Vanessa M. Patrick
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    ABSTRACT: This study investigates the identity transformation from mere survivor to heroic survivor of cancer. Utilizing a multi-method approach, interviews with seventeen female cancer survivors and five blog analyses, this research sheds light on the processes involved in the transformation from mere survivor to heroic survivor and the integral role of brands in this transformation process. Brands are used to signal heroism to the self (inward expression) and to others (outward expression) as well as to combat countervailing forces that deter the survivor's progress toward mastery of a heroic identity. The findings provide a rich understanding of the heroic archetype and its centrality to the mastery of survivorship. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications for brand managers, giving attention to the importance of consumer-brand relationships.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Business Research
  • Henrik Hagtvedt · Vanessa M. Patrick
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    ABSTRACT: If luxury retail strategy aims to generate awe rather than community, while charities convey community rather than awe, should luxury and charity partner at the point of sale? This research suggests that an association with charity at the point of sale can increase choice of (Study 1) and purchase intent toward (Study 2) a luxury brand and can facilitate upselling to a luxury (vs. value) store brand (Study 3). Further, it implicates guilt reduction as the underlying process mechanism (Studies 2 and 3). Managerial and retailing implications for cause-related marketing of luxury (vs. value) brands are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015
  • Henrik Hagtvedt · Vanessa M. Patrick
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    ABSTRACT: Aesthetic design, or styling, is an important product attribute in today's retail environment, especially when functional demands have been met (Chitturi, Raghunathan, & Mahajan, ; Hoegg, Alba, & Dahl, ). This research note, however, focuses on consumer responses to products when perceived functionality is low. Ideally, high styling is combined with high functionality, but perceived trade‐offs may arise when styling appears to conflict with functionality. This research highlights some implications of these trade‐offs and emphasizes that they depend on usage context. Specifically, the authors demonstrate that styling can compensate for minor, but not major, flaws in functionality (Study 1). Further, the influence of styling on perceived functionality and product evaluation is less (vs. more) favorable in a utilitarian (vs. hedonic) context (Study 2). Key insights for managers based on this research are discussed.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · Psychology and Marketing
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    Vanessa M. Patrick · Mario Pandelaere · Katrien Meert

    Full-text · Dataset · Feb 2014
  • Lauren I. Labrecque · Vanessa M. Patrick
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    ABSTRACT: Color carries meaning and can influence consumers’ thoughts, feelings and behaviors. Many disciplines, such as neuroscience, psychophysics, visual cognition, and biology have used new technologies to gain insights in understanding the complexities of color perception, yet there exists relatively little research in the field of marketing. This paper aims to reestablish the importance of color research in marketing, draw attention to the complex nature of this research and to fuel further investigation and the development of new insights about color as it relates to marketing. The authors offer an integrated conceptual framework centered on the embodied and referential meanings of color, and highlight the complexities and nuances that researchers must consider in order to develop this area. Insights from and gaps in the extant literature are highlighted to present a set of questions and propositions for future research in this area of investigation.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2013 · Psychology and Marketing
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    Katrien Meert · Mario Pandelaere · Vanessa M. Patrick
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    ABSTRACT: Human beings are attracted to glossy objects. However, the investigation of whether this preference for glossy is a systematic bias, and the rationale for why, has received little or no attention. Drawing on an evolutionary psychology framework, we propose and test the hypothesis that the preference for glossy stems from an innate preference for water as a valuable resource. In a set of six studies we demonstrate the preference for glossy amongst both adults and young children (studies 1A, 1B and 2) ruling out a socialization explanation, investigate the hypothesis that the preference for glossy stems from an innate need for water as a resource (studies 3 and 5) and, in addition, rule out the more superficial account of glossy = pretty (study 4). The interplay between the different perspectives, implications of the findings and future research directions are discussed.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Journal of Consumer Psychology
  • Vanessa M. Patrick · Henrik Hagtvedt
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    ABSTRACT: This research investigates the influence of refusal frames on persuasiveness in an interpersonal context. Specifically, the refusal frame “I don’t” is more persuasive than the refusal frame “I can’t” because the former connotes conviction to a higher degree. This perceived conviction is tied to the identity-signaling function of the refusal frame. Two studies demonstrate that 1) the “don’t” frame is more persuasive than the “can’t” frame, 2) perceived conviction mediates the influence of refusal frame on persuasiveness, and 3) attributions to the refuser’s identity explain perceived conviction.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2012 · International Journal of Research in Marketing
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    Vanessa M. Patrick · Henrik Hagtvedt
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    ABSTRACT: This research is based on the insight that the language we use to describe our choices serves as a feedback mechanism that either enhances or impedes our goal-directed behavior. Specifically, we investigate the influence of a linguistic element of self-talk, in which a refusal may be framed as “I don’t” (vs. “I can’t”), on resisting temptation and motivating goal-directed behavior. We present a set of four studies to demonstrate the efficacy of the “don’t” (vs. “can’t”) framing (studies 1–3) when the source of the goal is internal (vs. external; studies 2A and 2B), as well as the mediating role of psychological empowerment (studies 1, 2A, and 2B). We demonstrate this novel and effective refusal strategy with actual choice (study 1) and with behavioral intent (studies 2A and 2B) and also illustrate its applicability in the real world in a longitudinal intervention-based field study (study 3).
    Preview · Article · Aug 2012 · Journal of Consumer Research
  • Candice Hollenbeck · Vanessa M. Patrick
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    ABSTRACT: Despite the accessibility of social media and networking sites, consumers still feel lonely.The current research investigates a particular form of loneliness experienced by cancer survivors – survivor loneliness – and seeks to understand the role of technology as a coping mechanism. Prior research shows that loneliness can be reduced by increasing social support via technology and that technological tools such as communal forums can serve as important tools to alleviate loneliness. However, do all cancer patients use technology in the same way? Our findings illustrate that cancer survivors differ in their motivation and ability to rely on available technology to cope with lonely feelings. In addition, to alleviate social isolation, patients must be able to engage in congenial conversation within an online patient support community. Utilizing depth interviews with cancer survivors, our study helps promote the well-being of this population by providing insights and offering recommendations regarding their use of technology.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2012
  • Julia Belyavsky Bayuk · Vanessa M. Patrick
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    ABSTRACT: We demonstrate that a difficult (versus easy) investment process increases retirement savings (a "no pain, no gain" effect) for individuals who have limited information about retirement.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2012
  • Henrik Hagtvedt · Vanessa M. Patrick
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    ABSTRACT: Luxury brands often partner with charities. Prior research suggests that these partnerships can be successful because altruism feels good. We propose an alternative explanation: that the association with charity allows consumers to experience the pleasure of luxury with less guilt than they might otherwise feel. In three experiments we demonstrate that charity co-branding has a favorable influence on purchase intent toward luxury products, via a mechanism of guilt reduction (Studies 1 and 2), while this influence is diminished for consumers with a reward (vs. indulgence) motivation (Study 3).
    No preview · Article · Jun 2012
  • Vanessa M. Patrick · C.W. Park · Henrik Hagtvedt
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    ABSTRACT: Some products have a transformative impact on our consumption behaviors, occur relatively rarely, and, are recognized only in hindsight. In this research we aim to investigate the characteristics of these products and the acquisition motivations they evoke. Depth interviews are utilized to uncover the nature of acquisition motivations that transform the evolution of consumption over time. We discuss the theoretical, managerial, and public policy implications of these motivations, and suggest directions for further investigation.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2012
  • Vanessa M. Patrick · Sonja Prokopec
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    ABSTRACT: The current research suggests that what determines whether a luxury brand is diluted by a successful brand extension is the extent to which the lower-end extension is able to satiate the consumer’s desire for the luxury brand experience. We thus propose a theory of dream substitution to explain when and why a successful luxury brand extension can result in dilution of the luxury brand.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2012
  • Vanessa M. Patrick · Henrik Hagtvedt
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    ABSTRACT: Image modification is a frequently used technique in advertising, but there exists little theory or empirical research to assess whether, when, and how image modification influences consumer response. Further, apparent contradictions arise when extrapolating perspectives from the extant literature, with one stream of literature suggesting that familiar images have a favorable influence and another stream suggesting that novel images do. We propose that the two perspectives do not always conflict and present a theory of novelizing the familiar, suggesting that a combination of familiarity and novelty in visual images may in fact be optimal. We present three experiments to support this theory in the context of modified images. In addition, we implicate perceived ingenuity, the recognition of creative cleverness in a stimulus, as the consumer response that underlies effective image modification.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2012
  • Vanessa M. Patrick · Kelly Haws
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    ABSTRACT: Subtle differences in language can influence consumer perception. We examine the difference between using the conjunctions “and” versus “with” in communicating value in product combinations. We theorize that individuals engage in a lexical inferencing process when encoding the semantic meaning of words used in natural language. Drawing on this theory, we show that the conjunction “and” is a value equivalent frame and connotes that both items in a product combination are of equal value, while the conjunction “with” is a value discriminant frame and subtly connotes that one item may be of greater value than another. We present a set of three experiments to demonstrate that (1) the conjunction “with” subtly connotes greater value than “and”, (2) this effect is observed when the product combination has two products that are unequal (not equal) in intrinsic value; study 1) and (3) the effect is enhanced by an analytical processing style (studies 2 and 3).
    No preview · Article · Jun 2012
  • Nicole L Mead · Vanessa M. Patrick
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    ABSTRACT: Scholars long have examined self-control strategies through the lens of resistance, emphasizing that willpower is the primary psychological resource that humans use to suppress hardwired visceral responses. However, resistance is often fallible because it draws from limited resources while simultaneously increasing desire for the forbidden good. The present work examines a novel strategy that facilitates self-control through desire-reduction rather than willpower-enhancement: postponing pleasures. Participants who postponed consumption of a tempting snack consumed less of that snack in the short- and long-term, relative to participants who resisted, delayed gratification, or indulged. Consistent with theorizing, reduced consumption of the postponed snack in the longer-term (one week post-experiment) was accounted for by diminished desire for the snack. Whereas indefinite postponement diminished consumption, specific postponement resulted in ingestion.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2012
  • Sonja Prokopec · Francine Espinoza · Vanessa M. Patrick
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    ABSTRACT: Previous research shows that mental budgets are effective self-regulatory tools because they are set around a self-control goal and allow consumers to monitor their choices against this goal. Our research bridges the domains of mental budgeting and construal level theory to show that (1) mental budgets are more effective self-control devices when consumers make decisions for present versus future consumption (study 1) and (2) concrete (vs. abstract) mindsets increase reliance on mental budgets for both present and future decisions (studies 2 and 3).
    No preview · Article · Jun 2012
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    Amar Cheema · Vanessa M. Patrick
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    ABSTRACT: Across five studies, the authors demonstrate that warm (versus cool) temperatures deplete resources, increase System 1 processing, and influence performance on complex choice tasks. Real-world lottery data (Pilot Study) and a lab experiment (Study 1) demonstrate the effect of temperature on complex choice: individuals are less likely to make difficult gambles in warmer temperatures. Study 2 implicates resource depletion as the underlying process; warm temperatures lower cognitive performance for non-depleted individuals, but don’t affect the performance of depleted individuals. Study 3 illustrates the moderating role of task complexity to show that warm temperatures are depleting and decrease willingness to make a difficult product choice. Study 4 juxtaposes the effects of depletion and temperature to reveal that warm temperatures hamper performance on complex tasks because of the participants’ increased reliance on System 1 (heuristic) processing.
    Preview · Article · May 2012 · Journal of Marketing Research

Publication Stats

604 Citations
62.37 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009-2016
    • University of Houston
      • • C.T. Bauer College of Business
      • • Department of Marketing & Entrepreneurship
      Houston, Texas, United States
  • 2007-2009
    • University of Georgia
      • Department of Management
      Атина, Georgia, United States
  • 2004
    • University of Southern California
      • Marshall School of Business
      Los Angeles, California, United States