Mary J Ferraro

Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States

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Publications (4)10.55 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Hyle EP, Shu B, Lindstrom S, Klimov A, Hancock K, Ferraro MJ, Traum AZ, Michelow IC. A severely immunocompromised child with uncomplicated oseltamivir-resistant 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza infection. Abstract: 2009 H1N1 pandemic influenza was associated with increased risk for severe disease in children and the immunosuppressed. We report a case of uncomplicated pneumonia because of infection with oseltamivir-resistant 2009 H1N1 virus in an immunosuppressed pediatric renal transplant patient. Innate immunity and/or altered viral fitness may be responsible for the mild clinical phenotype of the case.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2011 · Pediatric Transplantation
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    E P Hyle · M J Ferraro · M Silver · H Lee · D C Hooper
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    ABSTRACT: Carbapenem resistance among Enterobacteriaceae is of concern because of increasing prevalence and limited therapeutic options. Limited research has been focused on understanding ertapenem resistance as a more sensitive marker for resistance to other carbapenems. We sought to determine risk factors for acquisition of ertapenem-resistant, meropenem-susceptible, or intermediate Enterobacteriaceae and to assess associated patient outcomes. Retrospective case-control study among adult hospitalized inpatients. A 902-bed quaternary care urban hospital. Sixty-two cases of ertapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae were identified from March 14, 2006, through October 31, 2007, and 62 unmatched control patients were randomly selected from other inpatients with cultures positive for ertapenem-susceptible Enterobacteriaceae. Thirty-seven (60%) of case patient isolates were Enterobacter cloacae, 20 (32%) were Klebsiella pneumoniae, and 5 (8%) were other species of Enterobacteriaceae. Risk factors for ertapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae infection included intensive care unit stay (odds ratio [OR], 4.6 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 2.0-10.3]), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus colonization (OR, 7.1 [95% CI, 2.4-21.4]), prior central venous catheter use (OR, 10.0 [95% CI, 3.0-33.1]), prior receipt of mechanical ventilation (OR, 5.8 [95% CI, 2.1-16.2]), exposure to any antibiotic during the 30 days prior to a positive culture result (OR, 18.5 [95% CI, 4.9-69.9]), use of a β-lactam during the 30 days prior to a positive culture result (OR, 6.9 [95% CI, 3.0-16.0], and use of a carbapenem during the 30 days prior to a positive culture result (OR, 18.2 [95% CI, 2.6-130.0]). For the 62 case patients, 30-day outcomes from the time of positive culture result were 24 discharges (39%), 10 deaths (16%), and 28 continued hospitalizations (44%). The final end point of the hospitalization was discharge for 44 patients (71%) and death for 18 patients (29%). Ertapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae are important nosocomial pathogens. Multiple mechanisms of resistance may be in operation. Additional study of ertapenem resistance is needed.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2010 · Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology
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    ABSTRACT: Members of the Streptococcus bovis group are important causes of endocarditis. However, factors associated with their pathogenicity, such as adhesins, remain uncharacterized. We recently demonstrated that endocarditis-derived Streptococcus gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates frequently adhere to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Here, we generated a draft genome sequence of an ECM protein-adherent S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus strain and found, by genome-wide analyses, 11 predicted LPXTG-type cell wall-anchored proteins with characteristics of MSCRAMMs, including a modular architecture of domains predicted to adopt immunoglobulin (Ig)-like folding. A recombinant segment of one of these, Acb, showed high-affinity binding to immobilized collagen, and cell surface expression of Acb correlated with the presence of acb and collagen adherence of isolates. Three of the 11 proteins have similarities to major pilus subunits and are organized in separate clusters, each including a second Ig-fold-containing MSCRAMM and a class C sortase, suggesting that the sequenced strain encodes three distinct types of pili. Reverse transcription-PCR demonstrated that all three genes of one cluster, acb-sbs7-srtC1, are cotranscribed, consistent with pilus operons of other gram-positive bacteria. Further analysis detected expression of all 11 genes in cells grown to mid to late exponential growth phases. Wide distribution of 9 of the 11 genes was observed among S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates with fewer genes present in other S. bovis group species/subspecies. The high prevalence of genes encoding putative MSCRAMMs and pili, including a collagen-binding MSCRAMM, among S. gallolyticus subsp. gallolyticus isolates may play an important role in the predominance of this subspecies in S. bovis endocarditis.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2009 · Journal of bacteriology
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    ABSTRACT: Members of the Streptococcus bovis group are frequent colonizers of the intestinal tract, which can also cause endocarditis. However, their ability to adhere to and colonize host tissues and the factors associated with pathogenicity are largely unknown. Here, we assessed 17 endocarditis-derived human isolates [identified here as 15 Streptococcus gallolyticus ssp. gallolyticus (S. bovis biotype I), one S. gallolyticus ssp. pasteurianus (biotype II/2) and one Streptococcus infantarius ssp. coli (biotype II/1)] for their in vitro adherence to components of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Adherence to collagen type I was found to be the most common phenotype exhibited by 76% of isolates, followed by collagen type IV (53%), fibrinogen (47%), collagen type V (35%) and fibronectin (35%). Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analyses showed that >50% of endocarditis-derived S. gallolyticus ssp. gallolyticus isolates are genetically diverse, although two clusters of two and four isolates were observed. The diversity of strains and differences observed in adherence characteristics to distinct host ECM proteins suggest that isolates of S. gallolyticus ssp. gallolyticus produce different surface components, similar to other gram-positive pathogens, to colonize the host and cause infection.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2009 · FEMS Microbiology Letters