Marianne J Hjermstad

Oslo University Hospital, Kristiania (historical), Oslo, Norway

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Publications (117)356.18 Total impact

  • Elisabeth Brenne · Jon H Loge · Hanne Lie · Marianne J Hjermstad · Peter M Fayers · Stein Kaasa
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Depressive symptoms are prevalent in patients with advanced cancer, sometimes of a severity that fulfil the criteria for a major depressive episode. Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate how the item on depression in the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System with a 0-10 Numerical Rating Scale performed as a screener for major depressive episode. A possible improved performance by adding the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System-Anxiety item was also examined. Design: An international cross-sectional study including patients with incurable cancer was conducted. The Edmonton Symptom Assessment System score was compared against major depressive episode as assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. Screening performance was examined by sensitivity, specificity and the kappa coefficient. Setting: Patients with incurable cancer (n = 969), median age 63 years and from eight nationalities provided report. Median Karnofsky Performance Status was 70. Median survival was 229 days (205-255 days). Results: Patient Health Questionnaire-9 major depressive episode was present in 133 of 969 patients (13.7%). Edmonton Symptom Assessment System-Depression screening ability for Patient Health Questionnaire-9 major depressive episode was limited. Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.71 (0.66-0.76). Valid detection or exclusion of Patient Health Questionnaire-9 major depressive episode could not be concluded at any Edmonton Symptom Assessment System-Depression cut-off; by the cut-off Numerical Rating Scale ⩾ 2, sensitivity was 0.69 and specificity was 0.60. By the cut-off Numerical Rating Scale ⩾ 4, sensitivity was 0.51 and specificity was 0.82. Combined mean ratings by Edmonton Symptom Assessment System-Depression and Edmonton Symptom Assessment System-Anxiety revealed similar limited screening ability. Conclusion: The depression and anxiety items of the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System, a frequently used assessment tool in palliative care settings, seem to measure a construct other than major depressive episode as assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 instrument.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Palliative Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Assessing comorbidity using the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics (CIRS-G) and its comprehensive manual is time consuming. We investigated if similar information could be obtained by a simpler assessment based on the original CIRS. Materials and methods: Data from a randomized chemotherapy trial (RCT) on advanced NSCLC (non-small cell lung cancer) were analyzed. Baseline comorbidity was assessed by 1) trained oncologists using hospital records and the CIRS-G manual (CIRS-G), 2) by patients' oncologists/pulmonologists (local investigators=LI-score) using a brief set of instructions. By both methods, the severity of comorbidity in 14 organ systems was graded 0 (no problem) to 4 (extremely severe). The agreement between methods was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis and weighted kappa statistics. The impact of comorbidity on survival was analyzed by Cox regression. Results: Complete data were available for 375/446 (84%) patients enrolled in the RCT. Median age was 65years (25-85). Overall, more comorbidities and higher severity were registered by the CIRS-G compared to the LI-score. Severe comorbidity was registered for 184 (49%) and 94 (25%) patients according to the CIRS-G and LI-scores, respectively. Mean total score was 7.0 (0-17) (CIRS-G) versus 4.2 (0-16) (LI-score), and mean severity index (total score/number of categories with score >0) was 1.73 (SD 0.46) versus 1.43 (SD 0.78). Neither the CIRS-G scores nor the LI-scores were prognostic for survival. Conclusion: The CIRS-G scores and LI-scores had poor agreement, indicating that assessment method affects the registration of comorbidity. Thorough descriptions of comorbidity registrations in trials are paramount due to lack of a standardized assessment.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Journal of Geriatric Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: In the past decades, many new insights and best practices in palliative care, a relatively new field in health care, have been published. However, this knowledge is often not implemented. The aim of this study therefore was to identify strategies to implement improvement activities identified in a research project within daily palliative care practice. A nominal group technique was used with members of the IMPACT consortium, being international researchers and clinicians in cancer care, dementia care and palliative care. Participants identified and prioritized implementation strategies. Data was analyzed qualitatively using inductive coding. Twenty international clinicians and researchers participated in one of two parallel nominal group sessions. The recommended strategies to implement results from a research project were grouped in five common themes: 1. Dissemination of results e.g. by publishing results tailored to relevant audiences, 2. Identification and dissemination of unique selling points, 3. education e.g. by developing e-learning tools and integrating scientific evidence into core curricula, 4. Stimulation of participation of stakeholders, and 5. consideration of consequences e.g. rewarding services for their implementation successes but not services that fail to implement quality improvement activities. The added value of this nominal group study lies in the prioritisation by the experts of strategies to influence the implementation of quality improvement activities in palliative care. Efforts to ensure future use of scientific findings should be built into research projects in order to prevent waste of resources.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · BMC Palliative Care
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate whether pre-surgery health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and subjectively rated symptom scores are prognostic factors for survival in patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Methods: Patients undergoing pancreatic resection for PDAC completed the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and the EORTC QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PAN26 questionnaires preoperatively. Patient, tumor and treatment characteristics, recurrence and survival were registered. Results: Sixty-six consecutive patients underwent R0/R1 resection for PDAC. Baseline ESAS and EORTC questionnaire compliance was 44/66 (67%) with no statistically significant differences between compliers (n = 44) and non-compliers (n = 22) when comparing clinicopathological parameters and survival. Univariable analyses showed that three symptoms (nausea, dry mouth, cognitive function) and two clinicopathological factors (CA 19-9 > 400 U/ml, lymph node ratio > 0.1) were significantly associated with shorter survival (p < 0.05). In multivariable analysis, cognitive function was the only independent predictor for survival: hazard ratio = 0.35 (95%CI 0.13–0.93) for high vs low cognitive function. Median survival times for patients with high and low cognitive function were 21 and 10 months, respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Presurgery cognitive function is a significant independent predictor of survival in patients with resectable PDAC. Thus, presurgery patient reported outcomes may provide as strong prognostic information as clinicopathological factors.
    Preview · Article · Nov 2015 · HPB
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    ABSTRACT: The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire-Lung Cancer 13 (QLQ-LC13) covers 13 typical symptoms of lung cancer patients and was the first module developed in conjunction with the EORTC core quality-of-life (QL) questionnaire. This review investigates how the module has been used and reported in cancer clinical trials in the 20 years since its publication. Thirty-six databases were searched with a prespecified algorithm. This search plus an additional hand search generated 770 hits, 240 of which were clinical studies. Two raters extracted data using a coding scheme. Analyses focused on the randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Of the 240 clinical studies that were identified using the LC13, 109 (45%) were RCTs. More than half of the RCTs were phase 3 trials (n = 58). Twenty RCTs considered QL as the primary endpoint, and 68 considered it as a secondary endpoint. QL results were addressed in the results section of the article (n = 89) or in the abstract (n = 92); and, in half of the articles, QL results were presented in the form of tables (n = 53) or figures (n = 43). Furthermore, QL results had an impact on the evaluation of the therapy that could be clearly demonstrated in the 47 RCTs that yielded QL differences between treatment and control groups. The EORTC QLQ-LC13 fulfilled its mission to be used as a standard instrument in lung cancer clinical trials. An update of the LC13 is underway to keep up with new therapeutic trends and to ensure optimized and relevant QL assessment in future trials. Cancer 2015. © 2015 American Cancer Society.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Cancer

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Quality of Life Research

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Quality of Life Research
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Factors associated with the long-term dental effects after chemotherapy for childhood malignancies have not been well described. The primary aims of this study were as follows: (1) to assess whether age at diagnosis and treatment-related factors are associated with dental defects in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and (2) to assess the survivors' annual expenses for dental treatment compared to reference data. Methods: This cross-sectional study enrolled 111 Norwegian survivors of ALL diagnosed before the age of 16. All of the subjects completed a questionnaire and underwent medical and oral examinations. Dental defects were registered according to the individual defect index, with 0 = no defects and 140 = anodontia, and the caries experience was registered according to the decayed-missing-filled teeth index (DMFT). Age-matched reference data were drawn from a national general population survey (n = 555). Results: The mean age at examination was 29.1 years (SD 7.2), and mean follow-up period was 22.9 years (SD 7.3). In a regression model, diagnoses occurring at ≤5 years of age (B = -9.6, p < 0.001) and a cumulative dose of anthracyclines >120 mg/m(2) (B = 11.5, p < 0.001) were strongly associated with more severe dental defects. Survivors treated after the age of 5 had experienced more caries than those treated at a younger age [DMFT 9.6 (SD 6.1) vs. 6.0 (SD 4.6), respectively; p = 0.001]. High annual expenses for dental treatment were reported by a larger percentage of the reference population compared to the survivor group (18 vs. 9 %, respectively; p = 0.02). Conclusions: The age at diagnosis and the dose of anthracyclines appear to be strongly associated with the severity of dental defects, although few survivors reported high annual expenses for dental treatment. The increased risk of dental defects during adulthood should be communicated to ALL survivors.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Supportive Care in Cancer
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    ABSTRACT: Patient-reported outcomes should ideally be adapted to the individual patient while maintaining comparability of scores across patients. This is achievable using computerized adaptive testing (CAT). The aim here was to develop an item bank for CAT measurement of the pain domain as measured by the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire. The development process consisted of four steps: (1) literature search, (2) formulation of new items and expert evaluations, (3) pretesting and (4) field-testing and psychometric analyses for the final selection of items. In step 1, we identified 337 pain items from the literature. Twenty-nine new items fitting the QLQ-C30 item style were formulated in step 2 that were reduced to 26 items by expert evaluations. Based on interviews with 31 patients from Denmark, France and the UK, the list was further reduced to 21 items in step 3. In phase 4, responses were obtained from 1103 cancer patients from five countries. Psychometric evaluations showed that 16 items could be retained in a unidimensional item bank. Evaluations indicated that use of the CAT measure may reduce sample size requirements with 15-25 % compared to using the QLQ-C30 pain scale. We have established an item bank of 16 items suitable for CAT measurement of pain. While being backward compatible with the QLQ-C30, the new item bank will significantly improve measurement precision of pain. We recommend initiating CAT measurement by screening for pain using the two original QLQ-C30 pain items. The EORTC pain CAT is currently available for "experimental" purposes.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Quality of Life Research
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    ABSTRACT: The European population is ageing, and as a consequence, an increasing number of patients are in need of palliative care, including those with dementia. Although a growing number of new insights and best practices in palliative care have been published, they are often not implemented in daily practice. The aim of this integrative review is to provide an overview of implementation strategies that have been used to improve the organisation of palliative care. Using an integrative literature review, we evaluated publications with strategies to improve the organisation of palliative care. Qualitative analysis of the included studies involved categorisation of the implementation strategies into subgroups, according to the type of implementation strategy. From the 2379 publications identified, 68 studies with an experimental or quasi-experimental design were included. These studies described improvements using educational strategies (n = 14), process mapping (n = 1), feedback (n = 1), multidisciplinary meetings (n = 1) and multi-faceted implementation strategies (n = 51). Fifty-three studies reported positive outcomes, 11 studies reported mixed effects and four studies showed a limited effect (two educational and two multi-faceted strategies). This review is one of the first to provide an overview of the available literature in relation to strategies used to improve the organisation of palliative care. Since most studies reported positive results, further research is needed to identify and improve the effects of strategies aiming to improve the organisation of palliative care.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · Implementation Science
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    ABSTRACT: Recent research suggests a significant relationship between lean body mass (LBM) and toxicity from chemotherapeutic agents. We investigated if higher drug doses per kg LBM were associated with increased toxicity in stage IIIB/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients receiving a first-line chemotherapy regimen dosed according to body surface area (BSA). Data from patients randomised to receive intravenous gemcitabine 1000mg/m(2) plus orally vinorelbine 60mg/m(2) days 1 and 8 in a phase III trial comparing two chemotherapy regimens were analysed. LBM was estimated from assessment of the cross-sectional muscle area at the third lumbar level (L3) on computed tomography images obtained before chemotherapy commenced. Common terminology criteria for adverse events (CTCAE) grade 3-4 haematological toxicity and dose reduction and/or stop of treatment after the first course of chemotherapy were defined as primary and secondary toxicity outcomes. The study sample included 153 patients, mean age was 66 years, 55% were men, 87% had disease stage IV and 75% had performance status (PS) 0-1. Gemcitabine doses per kg LBM varied from 23.2 to 53.1 mg/kg LBM, and vinorelbine doses from 1.5 to 3.3mg/kg LBM. Higher doses of gemcitabine per kg LBM were significantly associated with grade 3-4 haematological toxicity in bivariate (OR=1.12, 95% CI 1.03-1.23, p=0.008) and multivariate analyses (OR=1.15, 95% CI 1.01-1.29, p=0.018), as were also higher doses of vinorelbine per kg LBM. No significant association was found between drug doses per kg LBM and dose reduction and/or stop of treatment. The study showed that dose estimates according to BSA lead to a substantial variation in drug dose per kg LBM, and higher doses per kg LBM are a significant predictor for chemotherapy-induced haematological toxicity. The results indicate that taking LBM into account may lead to a better dose individualisation of chemotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · Lung cancer (Amsterdam, Netherlands)
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    ABSTRACT: There is no universally accepted definition of cancer cachexia. Two classifications have been proposed; the 3-factor classification requiring ≥2 of 3 factors; weight loss ≥10%, food intake ≤1500 kcal/day, and C-reactive protein ≥10 mg/l, and the consensus classification requiring weight loss >5% the past 6 mo, or body mass index <20 kg/m(2) or sarcopenia, both with ongoing weight loss >2%. Precachexia is the initial stage of the cachexia trajectory, identified by weight loss ≤5%, anorexia and metabolic change. We examined the consistency between the 2 classifications, and their association with survival in a palliative cohort of 45 (25 men, median age of 72 yr, range 35-89) unresected pancreatic cancer patients. Computed tomography images were used to determine sarcopenia. Height/weight/C-reactive protein and survival were extracted from medical records. Food intake was self-reported. The agreement for cachexia and noncachexia was 78% across classifications. Survival was poorer in cachexia compared to noncachexia (3-factor classification, P = 0.0052; consensus classification, P = 0.056; when precachexia was included in the consensus classification, P = 0.027). Both classifications showed a trend toward lower median survival (P < 0.05) with the presence of cachexia. In conclusion, the two classifications showed good overall agreement in defining cachectic pancreatic cancer patients, and cachexia was associated with poorer survival according to both.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Nutrition and Cancer
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    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Supportive and Palliative Care
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    ABSTRACT: Depressive symptoms are common in patients with cancer and tend to increase as death approaches. The study aims were to examine the prevalence of depressive symptoms in patients with cancer in their final 24 h, and their association with other symptoms, sociodemographic and care characteristics. A stratified sample of deaths was drawn by Statistics Netherlands. Questionnaires on patient and care characteristics were sent to the physicians (N=6860) who signed the death certificates (response rate 77.8%). Adult patients with cancer with non-sudden death were included (n=1363). Symptoms during the final 24 h of life were assessed on a 1-5 scale and categorised as 1=no, 2-3=mild/moderate and 4-5=severe/very severe. Depressive symptoms were registered in 37.6% of the patients. Patients aged 80 years or more had a reduced risk of having mild/moderate depressive symptoms compared with those aged 17-65 years (OR 0.70; 95% CI 0.50 to 0.99). Elderly care physicians were more likely to assess patients with severe/very severe depressive symptoms than patients with no depressive symptoms (OR 4.18; 95% CI 1.48 to 11.76). Involvement of pain specialists/palliative care consultants and psychiatrists/psychologists was associated with more ratings of severe/very severe depressive symptoms. Fatigue and confusion were significantly associated with mild/moderate depressive symptoms and anxiety with severe/very severe symptoms. More than one-third of the patients were categorised with depressive symptoms during the last 24 h of life. We recommend greater awareness of depression earlier in the disease trajectory to improve care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Supportive and Palliative Care
  • H C Lie · M J Hjermstad · P Fayers · A Finset · S Kaasa · J H Loge
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with advanced cancer commonly experience multiple somatic symptoms and declining functioning. Some highly prevalent symptoms also overlap with diagnostic symptom-criteria of depression. Thus, assessing depression in these patients can be challenging. We therefore investigated 1) the effect of different scoring-methods of depressive symptoms on detecting depression, and 2) the relationship between disease load and depression amongst patients with advanced cancer. The sample included 969 patients in the European Palliative Care Research Collaborative-Computer Symptom Assessment Study (EPCRC-CSA). Inclusion criteria were: incurable metastatic/locally advanced cancer and ≥18 years. Biomarkers and length of survival were registered from patient-records. Depression was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and applying three scoring-methods: inclusive (algorithm scoring including the somatic symptom-criteria), exclusive (algorithm scoring excluding the somatic symptom-criteria) and sum-score (sum of all symptoms with a cut-off ≥8). Depression prevalence rates varied according to scoring-method: inclusive 13.7%, exclusive 14.9% and sum-score 45.3%. Agreement between the algorithm scoring-methods was excellent (Kappa=0.81), but low between the inclusive and sum scoring-methods (Kappa=0.32). Depression was significantly associated with more pain (OR-range: 1.09-1.19, p<0.001-0.04) and lower performance status (KPS-score, OR-range=0.68-0.72, p<0.001) irrespective of scoring-method. Depression was assessed using self-report, not clinical interviews. The scoring-method, not excluding somatic symptoms, had the greatest effect on assessment outcomes. Increasing pain and poorer than expected physical condition should alert clinicians to possible co-morbid depression. The large discrepancy in prevalence rates between scoring-methods reinforces the need for consensus and validation of depression definitions and assessment in populations with high disease load. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Journal of Affective Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: Depression is common in patients with advanced cancer; however, it is not often recognized and therefore not treated. The aims of this study were to examine the prevalence of the use of antidepressants (ADs) in an international cross-sectional study sample and to identify sociodemographic and medical variables associated with their use. The study was conducted in patients with advanced cancer from 17 centres across eight countries. Healthcare professionals registered patient and disease-related characteristics. A dichotomous score (no/yes) was used to assess the use of ADs other than as adjuvant for pain. Self-report questionnaires from patients were used for the assessment of functioning and symptom intensity. Of 1051 patient records with complete data on ADs, 1048 were included (M:540/F:508, mean age 62 years, standard deviation [SD] 12). The majority were inpatients, and 85% had metastatic disease. The prevalence of AD use was 14%. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that younger age (odds ratio [OR] 2.46; confidence interval [CI] 1.32-4.55), female gender (OR 1.59; CI 1.09-2.33), current medication for pain (OR 2.68; CI 1.65-4.33) and presence of three or more co-morbidities (OR 4.74; CI 2.27-9.91) were associated with AD use for reasons other than pain. Disease-related variables (diagnoses, stage, Karnofsky Performance Status and survival) were not associated with the use of ADs. Female gender, younger age, analgesic use and multiple co-morbidities were associated with the use of ADs. However, information is still limited on which variables guide physicians in prescribing AD medication. Further longitudinal studies including details on psychiatric and medication history are needed to improve the identification of patients in need of ADs. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · Psycho-Oncology

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Journal of Geriatric Oncology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The objective of this study was to pilot test an updated version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Head and Neck Module (EORTC QLQ-H&N60). Methods: Patients with head and neck cancer were asked to complete a list of 60 head and neck cancer-specific items comprising the updated EORTC head and neck module and the core questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30. Debriefing interviews were conducted to identify any irrelevant items and confusing or upsetting wording. Results: Interviews were performed with 330 patients from 17 countries, representing different head and neck cancer sites and treatments. Forty-one of the 60 items were retained according to the predefined EORTC criteria for module development, for another 2 items the wording was refined, and 17 items were removed. Conclusion: The preliminary EORTC QLQ-H&N43 can now be used in academic research. Psychometrics will be tested in a larger field study. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 37: 1358-1367, 2015.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014 · Head & Neck
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    Petter Wilberg · Marianne J Hjermstad · Stig Ottesen · Bente B Herlofson
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    ABSTRACT: Context: Chemotherapy induces a wide array of acute and late oral adverse effects which makes symptom alleviation and information an important part of patient care. Aims: To assess the prevalence and intensity of oral problems in outpatients receiving chemotherapy for cancers outside the head and neck region, and to investigate if information about possible oral adverse effects was received by the patients. Methods: Outpatients coming for scheduled chemotherapy at the Cancer Centre, aged 18 years or above were invited to participate and included if they fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All patients completed the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), underwent a semi-structured interview and an oral examination conducted by a dentist. Results: Of 226 eligible patients 155 (69%) participated. Mean age was 57 yrs (SD 11.8), 34% were males. Breast (45%) and gastro-intestinal cancers (37%) were the most prevalent diagnoses. Xerostomia was reported by 59%, taste changes by 62%, oral discomfort by 41%, and 27% had problems eating. Fatigue (48%) and xerostomia (37%) were the most prevalent bothersome symptoms on the ESAS (score >3). Oral discomfort was not related to the number cycles received prior to the assessment, but with the total number medications (p=0.01). Twenty-seven percent confirmed that they had received information on oral adverse effects of cancer treatment. Patients reporting oral discomfort were significantly less satisfied with the information received (p=0.01) Conclusions: Oral problems were frequently reported by patients. Less than one-third of the patients remembered receiving information about oral problems associated with chemotherapy. Re-information on oral adverse effects during cancer treatment is needed. Patients should be instructed on how to optimize their oral health during and after chemotherapy.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jun 2014
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    Petter Wilberg · Marianne J Hjermstad · Stig Ottesen · Bente Brokstad Herlofson
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    ABSTRACT: Chemotherapy induces a wide array of acute and late oral adverse effects that makes symptom alleviation and information important parts of patient care. To assess the prevalence and intensity of acute oral problems in outpatients receiving chemotherapy for cancers outside the head and neck region, and to investigate if information about possible oral adverse effects was received by the patients. In this cross-sectional study, outpatients aged 18 years or older were invited to participate and included if they fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All patients completed the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS), participated in a semi-structured interview and underwent an oral examination by a dentist. Of 226 eligible patients, 155 (69%) participated. Mean age was 57 years and 34% were males. The most prevalent diagnoses were breast (45%) and gastrointestinal cancers (37%). Xerostomia was reported by 59%, taste changes by 62%, oral discomfort by 41%, and 27% had problems eating. Fatigue (3.4) and xerostomia (3.1) received the highest intensity scores on the ESAS. Oral candidiasis confirmed by positive cultures was seen in 10%. Twenty-seven percent confirmed that they had received information on oral adverse effects of cancer treatment. Oral sequelae were frequently reported, and health care providers should be attentive to the presence and severity of these problems. Less than one-third of the patients remembered having received information about oral sequelae associated with chemotherapy. A continuous focus on how to diagnose, manage and inform about oral cancer-related complications is advisable.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Journal of pain and symptom management

Publication Stats

3k Citations
356.18 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2005-2015
    • Oslo University Hospital
      • • Department of Oncology
      • • Center for Clinical Heart Research
      Kristiania (historical), Oslo, Norway
  • 2004-2014
    • University of Oslo
      • Department of Behavioural Sciences in Medicine
      Kristiania (historical), Oslo, Norway
  • 1998-2014
    • Norwegian University of Science and Technology
      • • Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine
      • • Unit for Applied Clinical Research
      Nidaros, Sør-Trøndelag, Norway
  • 2006-2013
    • St. Olavs Hospital
      • Department of Physiotherapy
      Nidaros, Sør-Trøndelag, Norway
  • 2009
    • Haukeland University Hospital
      Bergen, Hordaland, Norway
  • 2005-2008
    • University of Aberdeen
      Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom
  • 1999-2003
    • Norwegian Cancer Society
      Kristiania (historical), Oslo County, Norway
  • 2001
    • Lund University
      • Department of Oncology
      Lund, Skåne, Sweden
  • 1995
    • University Hospital of North Norway
      Tromsø, Troms, Norway