Liam Smeeth

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Londinium, England, United Kingdom

Are you Liam Smeeth?

Claim your profile

Publications (276)2494.18 Total impact

  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Whilst the relationship between lipids and cardiovascular mortality has been well studied and appears to be controversial, very little has been explored in the context of rural-to-urban migration in low-resource settings. Determine the profile and related factors for HDL-c patterns (isolated and non-isolated low HDL-c) in three population-based groups according to their migration status, and determine the effect of HDL-c patterns on the rates of cardiovascular outcomes (i.e. non-fatal stroke and non-fatal myocardial infarction) and mortality. Cross-sectional and 5-year longitudinal data from the PERU MIGRANT study, designed to assess the effect of migration on cardiovascular risk profiles and mortality in Peru. Two different analyses were performed: first, we estimated prevalence and associated factors with isolated and non-isolated low HDL-c at baseline. Second, using longitudinal information, relative risk ratios (RRR) of composite outcomes of mortality, non-fatal stroke and non-fatal myocardial infarction were calculated according to HDL-c levels at baseline. Data from 988 participants, rural (n = 201), rural-to-urban migrants (n = 589), and urban (n = 199) groups, was analysed. Low HDL-c was present in 56.5% (95%CI: 53.4%-59.6%) without differences by study groups. Isolated low HDL-c was found in 36.5% (95%CI: 33.5-39.5%), with differences between study groups. In multivariable analysis, urban group (vs. rural), female gender, overweight and obesity were independently associated with isolated low HDL-c. Only female gender, overweight and obesity were associated with non-isolated low HDL-c. Longitudinal analyses showed that non-isolated low HDL-c increased the risk of negative cardiovascular outcomes (RRR = 3.46; 95%CI: 1.23-9.74). Isolated low HDL-c was the most common dyslipidaemia in the study population and was more frequent in rural subjects. Non-isolated low HDL-c increased three-to fourfold the 5-year risk of cardiovascular outcomes.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2016 · Atherosclerosis

  • No preview · Article · Feb 2016 · International Journal of COPD
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Reviews of the epidemiology of Huntington's disease (HD) suggest that its worldwide prevalence varies widely. This review was undertaken to confirm these observations, to assess the extent to which differences in case-ascertainment and/or diagnosis might be responsible, and to investigate whether the prevalence pattern has changed over the past 50 years. Methods: Eighty two relevant studies were identified from Medline and Embase, previous reviews, scrutiny of references from included and excluded studies and enquiry among those interested in the field. Results: The lowest rates were among the Asians and the highest among the Caucasians. The differences are not fully explained by varying approaches to case-ascertainment or diagnosis. There was evidence of an increasing prevalence of between 15 and 20% per decade in studies from Australia, North America and Western Europe. Conclusions: The prevalence of HD varies more than tenfold between different geographical regions. This variation can in part be attributed to differences in case-ascertainment and/or diagnostic criteria, but there is consistent evidence of a lower incidence in Asian populations. There is also evidence that in Australia, North America and in Western Europe (including the United Kingdom), prevalence has increased over the past 50 plus years.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Neuroepidemiology
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background: Physical inactivity and sedentary behaviors have been linked with impaired health outcomes. Establishing the physical inactivity profiles of a given population is needed to establish program targets and to contribute to international monitoring efforts. We report the prevalence of, and explore socio-demographical and built environment factors associated with physical inactivity in four resource-limited settings in Peru: rural Puno, urban Puno, Pampas de San Juan de Miraflores (urban), and Tumbes (semi-urban). Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of the CRONICAS Cohort Study's baseline assessment. Outcomes of interest were physical inactivity of leisure time (<600 MET-min/week) and transport-related physical activity (not reporting walking or cycling trips) domains of the IPAQ, as well as watching TV, as a proxy of sedentarism (≥2 hours per day). Exposures included demographic factors and perceptions about neighborhood's safety. Associations were explored using Poisson regression models with robust standard errors. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) are presented. Results: Data from 3593 individuals were included: 48.5% males, mean age 55.1 (SD: 12.7) years. Physical inactivity was present at rates of 93.7% (95% CI 93.0%-94.5%) and 9.3% (95% CI 8.3%-10.2%) within the leisure time and transport domains, respectively. In addition, 41.7% (95%CI 40.1%-43.3%) of participants reported watching TV for more than two hours per day. Rates varied according to study settings (p<0.001). In multivariable analysis, being from rural settings was associated with 3% higher prevalence of leisure time physical inactivity relative to highly urban Lima. The pattern was different for transport-related physical inactivity: both Puno sites had around 75% to 50% lower prevalence of physical inactivity. Too much traffic was associated with higher levels of transport-related physical inactivity (PR=1.24; 95%CI 1.01-1.54). Conclusion: Our study showed high levels of inactivity and marked contrasting patterns by rural/urban sites. These findings highlight the need to generate synergies to expand nationwide physical activity surveillance systems.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Physical Activity and Health
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Evidence of the association of polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) with the full range of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) is limited. We examined their relationship with the first clinical presentation of the 12 most common CVDs in an unselected population-based cohort of men and women. Methods: We analysed CArdiovascular disease research using LInked Bespoke studies and Electronic health Records (CALIBER) data, which links primary care and hospital and mortality data in England, from 1997 to 2010. We assembled a cohort of men and women initially free from CVD at baseline and included all patients with PMR and/or GCA (PMR/GCA) diagnosis, matched by age, sex and general practice with up to 10 individuals without PMR/GCA. Random effects Poisson regression analysis was used to study the association between PMR/GCA and the initial presentation of 12 types of CVDs. Results: The analysis included 9776 patients with PMR only, 1164 with GCA only, 627 with PMR and GCA and 105 504 without either condition. During a median of 3.14 years of follow-up 2787 (24.1%) individuals with PMR/GCA and 21 559 (20.4%) without PMR/GCA developed CVDs. Patients with PMR/GCA had lower rates of unheralded coronary death (3.18 vs 3.61/1000 person-years; adjusted incidence ratio 0.79, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.95), transient ischaemic attack (5.11 vs 5.61/1000 person-years; 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 to 0.84) and coronary and death composite (24.17 vs 25.80/1000 person-years; 0.90, 95% CI 0.82 to 0.98). No associations were observed for other CVDs or cerebrovascular diseases, and in patients with only PMR or GCA. No evidence of interaction by age or sex was found. Estimates decreased with longer PMR/GCA duration and findings were robust to multiple sensitivity analyses. Conclusions: In this large contemporary population-based cohort the presence of PMR and/or GCA was not associated with an increased risk of CVDs or cerebrovascular diseases regardless of PMR/GCA duration.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Heart (British Cardiac Society)
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Growing epidemiological evidence demonstrates increased zoster risks in people with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Study objectives were to determine zoster vaccine effectiveness in individuals with CKD in pragmatic use. Methods A population-based cohort study was undertaken in a 5% random sample of US Medicare from 2007 to 2009 involving 766 330 eligible individuals aged ≥65 years who were (29 785) and were not (736 545) exposed to the zoster vaccine. Incidence rates for zoster in vaccinated and unvaccinated individuals and hazard ratios for zoster comparing vaccinated with unvaccinated were determined for individuals with CKD. Time-updated Cox proportional hazards models were used, adjusting for relevant confounders. Results CKD was present in 183 762 (24%) of individuals (15% of vaccinees). Adjusted vaccine effectiveness [95% confidence intervals (CIs)] in individuals with CKD was 0.49 (0.36–0.65). The adjusted vaccine effectiveness in participants with both CKD and diabetes mellitus was 0.46 (95% CI 0.09–0.68). Vaccine effectiveness estimates were similar to those previously reported for the general population [vaccine effectiveness 0.48 (95% CI 0.39–0.56)]. Conclusions Zoster vaccine is effective against incident zoster in older individuals with CKD. Extra efforts are warranted to increase vaccine uptake in individuals with CKD given the known low uptake in these higher risk individuals.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: Electronic health records are widely used for public health research, and linked data sources are increasingly available. The added value of using linked records over stand-alone data has not been quantified for common conditions such as community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). Study design and setting: Our cohort comprised English patients aged ≥65 years from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, eligible for record linkage to Hospital Episode Statistics. Stand-alone general practice (GP) records were used to calculate CAP incidence over time using population-averaged Poisson regression. Incidence was then re-calculated for the same patients' using their linked GP-hospital admission data. Results of the two analyses were compared. Results: Over 900,000 patients were included in each analysis. Population-averaged CAP incidence was 39% higher using the linked-data than stand-alone data. This difference grew over time from 7% in 1997 to 83% by 2010. An increasingly larger number of pneumonia events were recorded in the hospital admission data compared to the GP data over time. Conclusion: Use of primary or secondary care data in isolation may not give accurate incidence estimates for important infections in older populations. Further work is needed to establish the extent of this finding in other diseases, age groups and populations.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of clinical epidemiology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Bariatric surgery is becoming a more widespread treatment for obesity. Comprehensive evidence of the long-term effects of contemporary surgery on a broad range of clinical outcomes in large populations treated in routine clinical practice is lacking. The objective of this study was to measure the association between bariatric surgery, weight, body mass index, and obesity-related co-morbidities. This was an observational retrospective cohort study using data from the United Kingdom Clinical Practice Research Datalink. All 3,882 patients registered in the database and with bariatric surgery on or before 31 December 2014 were included and matched by propensity score to 3,882 obese patients without surgery. The main outcome measures were change in weight and body mass index over 4 y; incident diagnoses of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), hypertension, angina, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, fractures, obstructive sleep apnoea, and cancer; mortality; and resolution of hypertension and T2DM. Weight measures were available for 3,847 patients between 1 and 4 mo, 2,884 patients between 5 and 12 mo, and 2,258 patients between 13 and 48 mo post-procedure. Bariatric surgery patients exhibited rapid weight loss for the first four postoperative months, at a rate of 4.98 kg/mo (95% CI 4.88-5.08). Slower weight loss was sustained to the end of 4 y. Gastric bypass (6.56 kg/mo) and sleeve gastrectomy (6.29 kg/mo) were associated with greater initial weight reduction than gastric banding (2.77 kg/mo). Protective hazard ratios (HRs) were detected for bariatric surgery for incident T2DM, 0.68 (95% CI 0.55-0.83); hypertension, 0.35 (95% CI 0.27-0.45); angina, 0.59 (95% CI 0.40-0.87);MI, 0.28 (95% CI 0.10-0.74); and obstructive sleep apnoea, 0.55 (95% CI 0.40-0.87). Strong associations were found between bariatric surgery and the resolution of T2DM, with a HR of 9.29 (95% CI 6.84-12.62), and between bariatric surgery and the resolution of hypertension, with a HR of 5.64 (95% CI 2.65-11.99). No association was detected between bariatric surgery and fractures, cancer, or stroke. Effect estimates for mortality found no protective association with bariatric surgery overall, with a HR of 0.97 (95% CI 0.66-1.43). The data used were recorded for the management of patients in primary care and may be subject to inaccuracy, which would tend to lead to underestimates of true relative effect sizes. Bariatric surgery as delivered in the UK healthcare system is associated with dramatic weight loss, sustained at least 4 y after surgery. This weight loss is accompanied by substantial improvements in pre-existing T2DM and hypertension, as well as a reduced risk of incident T2DM, hypertension, angina, MI, and obstructive sleep apnoea. Widening the availability of bariatric surgery could lead to substantial health benefits for many people who are morbidly obese.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · PLoS Medicine
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Herpes zoster is common and can have serious consequences. Additionally, emerging data suggest an increased risk of acute cardiovascular events following herpes zoster. However, to our knowledge, existing association studies compare outcomes between individuals and are therefore vulnerable to between-person confounding. In this study, we used a within-person study design to quantify any short-term increased risk of acute cardiovascular events (stroke and myocardial infarction [MI]) after zoster and to assess whether zoster vaccination modifies this association. The self-controlled case series method was used to estimate rates of stroke and acute MI in defined periods after herpes zoster compared to other time periods, within individuals. Participants were fully eligible Medicare beneficiaries aged ≥65 y with a herpes zoster diagnosis and either an ischemic stroke (n = 42,954) or MI (n = 24,237) between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2011. Age-adjusted incidence ratios (IRs) for stroke and MI during predefined periods up to 12 mo after zoster relative to unexposed time periods were calculated using conditional Poisson regression. We observed a marked increase in the rate of acute cardiovascular events in the first week after zoster diagnosis: a 2.4-fold increased ischemic stroke rate (IR 2.37, 95% CI 2.17-2.59) and a 1.7-fold increased MI rate (IR 1.68, 95% CI 1.47-1.92), followed by a gradual resolution over 6 mo. Zoster vaccination did not appear to modify the association with MI (interaction p-value = 0.44). We also found no evidence for a difference in the IR for ischemic stroke between vaccinated (IR 1.14, 95% CI 0.75-1.74) and unvaccinated (IR 1.78, 95% CI 1.68-1.88) individuals during the first 4 wk after zoster diagnosis (interaction p-value = 0.28). The relatively few vaccinated individuals limited the study's power to assess the role of vaccination. Stroke and MI rates are transiently increased after exposure to herpes zoster. We found no evidence for a role of zoster vaccination in these associations. These findings enhance our understanding of the temporality and magnitude of the association between zoster and acute cardiovascular events.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · PLoS Medicine
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives: Data on renal dysfunction in sub-Saharan Africa, comparing urban and rural areas, has not yet been reported. Therefore, we aimed to determine the distribution of low estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFR) in urban and rural Tanzania; to describe factors associated with low eGFR, and to quantify fractions attributable to common risk factors. Methods: We conducted a community based survey of 1095 randomly selected Tanzanian adults (≥18 years). A structured questionnaire and examinations were used to document socio-demographic characteristics, diet, physical activity, anthropomorphic measurements and blood pressure. Blood tests were performed for HIV infection, diabetes mellitus and creatinine. eGFR was calculated using 2 equations recommended for African adults. Results: Serum creatinine was available for 1043 participants: 170 in Mwanza city, 326 in district towns and 547 in rural areas. Mean age was 35.5 years and 54% were females. The prevalence of eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m(2) in these 3 strata was 2.3% (95%CI=0.8-6.6%), 7.5% (4.7-11.8%), and 7.4% (5.1-10.6%) respectively. When age-standardised to the WHO world population, prevalences were 3.8%, 10.1% and 8.1%. Factors associated with low eGFR included district town residence, older age, greater wealth, less physical activity and hypertension. Only 21% of cases with eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m(2) were attributable to HIV, hypertension or diabetes. Conclusions: Decreased renal function is common in Tanzania, particularly in district towns, and unique risk factors for kidney disease may exist in this population. Population specific strategies for prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of kidney disease are needed for Africa. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2015 · Tropical Medicine & International Health
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Figure appendix 1: Change in life expectancy at birth for both sexes (A), men (B), and women (C) in EU15+ countries, British nations, and English regions from 1990 to 2013 by broad cause group
    Full-text · Dataset · Dec 2015
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: In the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013 (GBD 2013), knowledge about health and its determinants has been integrated into a comparable framework to inform health policy. Outputs of this analysis are relevant to current policy questions in England and elsewhere, particularly on health inequalities. We use GBD 2013 data on mortality and causes of death, and disease and injury incidence and prevalence to analyse the burden of disease and injury in England as a whole, in English regions, and within each English region by deprivation quintile. We also assess disease and injury burden in England attributable to potentially preventable risk factors. England and the English regions are compared with the remaining constituent countries of the UK and with comparable countries in the European Union (EU) and beyond. We extracted data from the GBD 2013 to compare mortality, causes of death, years of life lost (YLLs), years lived with a disability (YLDs), and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) in England, the UK, and 18 other countries (the first 15 EU members [apart from the UK] and Australia, Canada, Norway, and the USA [EU15+]). We extended elements of the analysis to English regions, and subregional areas defined by deprivation quintile (deprivation areas). We used data split by the nine English regions (corresponding to the European boundaries of the Nomenclature for Territorial Statistics level 1 [NUTS 1] regions), and by quintile groups within each English region according to deprivation, thereby making 45 regional deprivation areas. Deprivation quintiles were defined by area of residence ranked at national level by Index of Multiple Deprivation score, 2010. Burden due to various risk factors is described for England using new GBD methodology to estimate independent and overlapping attributable risk for five tiers of behavioural, metabolic, and environmental risk factors. We present results for 306 causes and 2337 sequelae, and 79 risks or risk clusters. Between 1990 and 2013, life expectancy from birth in England increased by 5·4 years (95% uncertainty interval 5·0-5·8) from 75·9 years (75·9-76·0) to 81·3 years (80·9-81·7); gains were greater for men than for women. Rates of age-standardised YLLs reduced by 41·1% (38·3-43·6), whereas DALYs were reduced by 23·8% (20·9-27·1), and YLDs by 1·4% (0·1-2·8). For these measures, England ranked better than the UK and the EU15+ means. Between 1990 and 2013, the range in life expectancy among 45 regional deprivation areas remained 8·2 years for men and decreased from 7·2 years in 1990 to 6·9 years in 2013 for women. In 2013, the leading cause of YLLs was ischaemic heart disease, and the leading cause of DALYs was low back and neck pain. Known risk factors accounted for 39·6% (37·7-41·7) of DALYs; leading behavioural risk factors were suboptimal diet (10·8% [9·1-12·7]) and tobacco (10·7% [9·4-12·0]). Health in England is improving although substantial opportunities exist for further reductions in the burden of preventable disease. The gap in mortality rates between men and women has reduced, but marked health inequalities between the least deprived and most deprived areas remain. Declines in mortality have not been matched by similar declines in morbidity, resulting in people living longer with diseases. Health policies must therefore address the causes of ill health as well as those of premature mortality. Systematic action locally and nationally is needed to reduce risk exposures, support healthy behaviours, alleviate the severity of chronic disabling disorders, and mitigate the effects of socioeconomic deprivation. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Public Health England.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · The Lancet
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: This appendix provides three supplementary figures and nine supplementary tables.
    Full-text · Dataset · Dec 2015
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Figure appendix 2: Change in life expectancy at birth for men (A) and women (B) from 1990 to 2013 in deprivation areas of English regions by broad cause group
    Full-text · Dataset · Dec 2015
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives To determine factors associated with hospitalisation after community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) among older adults in England, and to investigate how these factors have contributed to increasing hospitalisations over time. Design Cohort study. Setting Primary and secondary care in England. Population 39 211 individuals from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, who were eligible for linkage to Hospital Episode Statistics and mortality data, were aged ≥65 and had at least 1 CAP episode between April 1998 and March 2011. Main outcome measures The association between hospitalisation within 28 days of CAP diagnosis (a ‘post-CAP’ hospitalisation) and a wide range of comorbidities, frailty factors, medications and vaccinations. We examined the role of these factors in post-CAP hospitalisation trends. We also looked at trends in post-CAP mortality and length of hospitalisation over the study period. Results 14 comorbidities, 5 frailty factors and 4 medications/vaccinations were associated with hospitalisation (of 18, 12 and 7 considered, respectively). Factors such as chronic lung disease, severe renal disease and diabetes were associated with increased likelihood of hospitalisation, whereas factors such as recent influenza vaccination and a recent antibiotic prescription decreased the odds of hospitalisation. Despite adjusting for these and other factors, the average predicted probability of hospitalisation after CAP rose markedly from 57% (1998–2000) to 86% (2009–2010). Duration of hospitalisation and 28-day mortality decreased over the study period. Conclusions The risk factors we describe enable identification of patients at increased likelihood of post-CAP hospitalisation and thus in need of proactive case management. Our analyses also provide evidence that while comorbidities and frailty factors contributed to increasing post-CAP hospitalisations in recent years, the trend appears to be largely driven by changes in service provision and patient behaviour.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015 · BMJ Open
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objective: We aimed to characterize metabolic status by body mass index (BMI) status. Methods: The CRONICAS longitudinal study was performed in an age-and-sex stratified random sample of participants aged 35 years or older in four Peruvian settings: Lima (Peru's capital, costal urban, highly urbanized), urban and rural Puno (both high-altitude), and Tumbes (costal semirural). Data from the baseline study, conducted in 2010, was used. Individuals were classified by BMI as normal weight (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25.0-29.9 kg/m2), and obese (≥30 kg/m2), and as metabolically healthy (0-1 metabolic abnormality) or metabolically unhealthy (≥2 abnormalities). Abnormalities included individual components of the metabolic syndrome, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and insulin resistance. Results: A total of 3088 (age 55.6±12.6 years, 51.3% females) had all measurements. Of these, 890 (28.8%), 1361 (44.1%) and 837 (27.1%) were normal weight, overweight and obese, respectively. Overall, 19.0% of normal weight in contrast to 54.9% of overweight and 77.7% of obese individuals had ≥3 risk factors (p<0.001). Among normal weight individuals, 43.1% were metabolically unhealthy, and age ≥65 years, female, and highest socioeconomic groups were more likely to have this pattern. In contrast, only 16.4% of overweight and 3.9% of obese individuals were metabolically healthy and, compared to Lima, the rural and urban sites in Puno were more likely to have a metabolically healthier profile. Conclusions: Most Peruvians with overweight and obesity have additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease, as well as a majority of those with a healthy weight. Prevention programs aimed at individuals with a normal BMI, and those who are overweight and obese, are urgently needed, such as screening for elevated fasting cholesterol and glucose.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015 · PLoS ONE
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: There is a paucity of data on incidence, prevalence and mortality associated with non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis.Using the Clinical Practice Research Datalink for participants registered between January 1, 2004 and December 31, 2013, we determined incidence, prevalence and mortality associated with bronchiectasis in the UK and investigated changes over time.The incidence and point prevalence of bronchiectasis increased yearly during the study period. Across all age groups, the incidence in women increased from 21.2 per 100 000 person-years in 2004 to 35.2 per 100 000 person-years in 2013 and in men from 18.2 per 100 000 person-years in 2004 to 26.9 per 100 000 person-years in 2013. The point prevalence in women increased from 350.5 per 100 000 in 2004 to 566.1 per 100 000 in 2013 and in men from 301.2 per 100 000 in 2004 to 485.5 per 100 000 in 2013. Comparing morality rates in women and men with bronchiectasis in England and Wales (n=11 862) with mortality rates in the general population from Office of National Statistics data showed that in women the age-adjusted mortality rate for the bronchiectasis population was 1437.7 per 100 000 and for the general population 635.9 per 100 000 (comparative mortality figure of 2.26). In men, the age-adjusted mortality rate for the bronchiectasis population was 1914.6 per 100 000 and for the general population 895.2 per 100 000 (comparative mortality figure of 2.14).Bronchiectasis is surprisingly common and is increasing in incidence and prevalence in the UK, particularly in older age groups. Bronchiectasis is associated with a markedly increased mortality.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · European Respiratory Journal
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Routinely collected health data, obtained for administrative and clinical purposes without specific a priori research goals, are increasingly used for research. The rapid evolution and availability of these data have revealed issues not addressed by existing reporting guidelines, such as Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE). The REporting of studies Conducted using Observational Routinely collected health Data (RECORD) statement was created to fill these gaps. RECORD was created as an extension to the STROBE statement to address reporting items specific to observational studies using routinely collected health data. RECORD consists of a checklist of 13 items related to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion section of articles, and other information required for inclusion in such research reports. This document contains the checklist and explanatory and elaboration information to enhance the use of the checklist. Examples of good reporting for each RECORD checklist item are also included herein. This document, as well as the accompanying website and message board (http://www.record-statement.org), will enhance the implementation and understanding of RECORD. Through implementation of RECORD, authors, journals editors, and peer reviewers can encourage transparency of research reporting.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · PLoS Medicine
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: To evaluate the association between length of residence in an urban area and obesity among Peruvian rural-to-urban migrants. Cross-sectional database analysis of the migrant group from the PERU MIGRANT Study (2007). Exposure was length of urban residence, analysed as both a continuous (10-year units) and a categorical variable. Four skinfold site measurements (biceps, triceps, subscapular and suprailiac) were used to calculate body fat percentage and obesity (body fat percentage >25% males, >33% females). We used Poisson generalized linear models to estimate adjusted prevalence ratios and 95 % confidence intervals. Multicollinearity between age and length of urban residence was assessed using conditional numbers and correlation tests. A peri-urban shantytown in the south of Lima, Peru. Rural-to-urban migrants (n 526) living in Lima. Multivariable analyses showed that for each 10-year unit increase in residence in an urban area, rural-to-urban migrants had, on average, a 12 % (95 % CI 6, 18 %) higher prevalence of obesity. This association was also present when length of urban residence was analysed in categories. Sensitivity analyses, conducted with non-migrant groups, showed no evidence of an association between 10-year age units and obesity in rural (P=0·159) or urban populations (P=0·078). High correlation and a large conditional number between age and length of urban residence were found, suggesting a strong collinearity between both variables. Longer lengths of urban residence are related to increased obesity in rural-to-urban migrant populations; therefore, interventions to prevent obesity in urban areas may benefit from targeting migrant groups.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Public Health Nutrition
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Objectives Cardiovascular disease is an important comorbidity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aimed to systematically review the evidence for: (1) risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in people with COPD; (2) risk of MI associated with acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD); (3) risk of death after MI in people with COPD. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE and SCI were searched up to January 2015. Two reviewers screened abstracts and full text records, extracted data and assessed studies for risk of bias. We used the generic inverse variance method to pool effect estimates, where possible. Evidence was synthesised in a narrative review where meta-analysis was not possible. Results Searches yielded 8362 records, and 24 observational studies were included. Meta-analysis showed increased risk of MI associated with COPD (HR 1.72, 95% CI 1.22 to 2.42) for cohort analyses, but not in case–control studies: OR 1.18 (0.80 to 1.76). Both included studies that investigated the risk of MI associated with AECOPD found an increased risk of MI after AECOPD (incidence rate ratios, IRR 2.27, 1.10 to 4.70, and IRR 13.04, 1.71 to 99.7). Meta-analysis showed weak evidence for increased risk of death for patients with COPD in hospital after MI (OR 1.13, 0.97 to 1.31). However, meta-analysis showed an increased risk of death after MI for patients with COPD during follow-up (HR 1.26, 1.13 to 1.40). Conclusions There is good evidence that COPD is associated with increased risk of MI; however, it is unclear to what extent this association is due to smoking status. There is some evidence that the risk of MI is higher during AECOPD than stable periods. There is poor evidence that COPD is associated with increased in hospital mortality after an MI, and good evidence that longer term mortality is higher for patients with COPD after an MI.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · BMJ Open

Publication Stats

8k Citations
2,494.18 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2001-2016
    • London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine
      • • Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health
      • • Department of Non-communicable Disease Epidemiology
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
  • 2015
    • The University of Manchester
      Manchester, England, United Kingdom
  • 2011-2015
    • Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia
      • Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas
      Λίμα, Lima, Peru
  • 2013
    • Utrecht University
      Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
    • University College London
      • Department of Epidemiology and Public Health
      London, ENG, United Kingdom
  • 2008
    • University of London
      Londinium, England, United Kingdom
    • University of Nottingham
      • Division of Respiratory Medicine
      Nottigham, England, United Kingdom
  • 2002-2004
    • McGill University
      • Department of Psychiatry
      Montréal, Quebec, Canada
  • 2000
    • University of Bristol
      Bristol, England, United Kingdom