Joachim Størling

University of Copenhagen Herlev Hospital, Herlev, Capital Region, Denmark

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Publications (40)219.9 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified over 40 type 1 diabetes risk loci. The clinical impact of these loci on β -cell function during disease progression is unknown. We aimed at testing whether a genetic risk score could predict glycemic control and residual β -cell function in type 1 diabetes (T1D). As gene expression may represent an intermediate phenotype between genetic variation and disease, we hypothesized that genes within T1D loci which are expressed in islets and transcriptionally regulated by proinflammatory cytokines would be the best predictors of disease progression. Two-thirds of 46 GWAS candidate genes examined were expressed in human islets, and 11 of these significantly changed expression levels following exposure to proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1 β + IFN γ + TNF α ) for 48 h. Using the GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from each locus, we constructed a genetic risk score based on the cumulative number of risk alleles carried in children with newly diagnosed T1D. With each additional risk allele carried, HbA1c levels increased significantly within first year after diagnosis. Network and gene ontology (GO) analyses revealed that several of the 11 candidate genes have overlapping biological functions and interact in a common network. Our results may help predict disease progression in newly diagnosed children with T1D which can be exploited for optimizing treatment.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Diabetes Research
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    ABSTRACT: The relative contributions of the JNK subtypes in inflammatory β -cell failure and apoptosis are unclear. The JNK protein family consists of JNK1, JNK2, and JNK3 subtypes, encompassing many different isoforms. INS-1 cells express JNK1 α 1, JNK1 α 2, JNK1 β 1, JNK1 β 2, JNK2 α 1, JNK2 α 2, JNK3 α 1, and JNK3 α 2 mRNA isoform transcripts translating into 46 and 54 kDa isoform JNK proteins. Utilizing Lentiviral mediated expression of shRNAs against JNK1, JNK2, or JNK3 in insulin-producing INS-1 cells, we investigated the role of individual JNK subtypes in IL-1 β -induced β -cell apoptosis. JNK1 knockdown prevented IL-1 β -induced INS-1 cell apoptosis associated with decreased 46 kDa isoform JNK protein phosphorylation and attenuated Myc expression. Transient knockdown of Myc also prevented IL-1 β -induced apoptosis as well as caspase 3 cleavage. JNK2 shRNA potentiated IL-1 β -induced apoptosis and caspase 3 cleavage, whereas JNK3 shRNA did not affect IL-1 β -induced β -cell death compared to nonsense shRNA expressing INS-1 cells. In conclusion, JNK1 mediates INS-1 cell death associated with increased Myc expression. These findings underline the importance of differentiated targeting of JNK subtypes in the development of inflammatory β -cell failure and destruction.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Diabetes Research
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    ABSTRACT: Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and interferon-γ (IFNγ) contribute to type 1 diabetes (T1D) by inducing β-cell death. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor (TRAF) proteins are adaptors that transduce signaling from a variety of membrane receptors including cytokine receptors. We show here that IL-1β and IFNγ upregulate the expression of TRAF2 in insulin-producing INS-1E cells and isolated rat pancreatic islets. siRNA-mediated knockdown (KD) of TRAF2 in INS-1E cells reduced IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of JNK1/2, but not of p38 or ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinases. TRAF2 KD did not modulate NFκB activation by cytokines, but reduced cytokine-induced inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) promotor activity and expression. We further observed that IFNγ-stimulated phosphorylation of STAT3 required TRAF2. KD of TRAF2 or STAT3 reduced cytokine-induced caspase 3/7 activation, but, intriguingly, potentiated cytokine-mediated loss of plasma membrane integrity and augmented the number of propidium iodide-positive cells. Finally, we found that TRAF2 KD increased cytokine-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In summary, our data suggest that TRAF2 is an important mediator of IL-1β and IFNγ signaling in pancreatic β-cells.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology
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    ABSTRACT: The study aimed to explore the role of ERBB3 in type 1 diabetes (T1D). We examined whether genetic variation of ERBB3 (rs2292239) affects residual β-cell function in T1D cases. Furthermore, we examined the expression of ERBB3 in human islets, the effect of ERBB3 knockdown on apoptosis in insulin-producing INS-1E cells and the genetic and regulatory architecture of the ERBB3 locus to provide insights to how rs2292239 may confer disease susceptibility. rs2292239 strongly correlated with residual β-cell function and metabolic control in children with T1D. ERBB3 locus associated with a lncRNA (NONHSAG011351) was expressed in human islets. ERBB3 was expressed and down-regulated by pro-inflammatory cytokines in human islets and INS-1E cells; knockdown of ERBB3 in INS-1E cells decreased basal and cytokine-induced apoptosis. Our data suggests an important functional role of ERBB3 and its potential regulators in the β-cells and may constitute novel targets to prevent β-cell destruction in T1D.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology
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    ABSTRACT: Over 40 susceptibility loci have been identified for type 1 diabetes (T1D). Little is known about how these variants modify disease risk and progression. Here, we combined in vitro and in vivo experiments with clinical studies to determine how genetic variation of the candidate gene cathepsin H (CTSH) affects disease mechanisms and progression in T1D. The T allele of rs3825932 was associated with lower CTSH expression in human lymphoblastoid cell lines and pancreatic tissue. Proinflammatory cytokines decreased the expression of CTSH in human islets and primary rat β-cells, and overexpression of CTSH protected insulin-secreting cells against cytokine-induced apoptosis. Mechanistic studies indicated that CTSH exerts its antiapoptotic effects through decreased JNK and p38 signaling and reduced expression of the proapoptotic factors Bim, DP5, and c-Myc. CTSH overexpression also up-regulated Ins2 expression and increased insulin secretion. Additionally, islets from Ctsh(-/-) mice contained less insulin than islets from WT mice. Importantly, the TT genotype was associated with higher daily insulin dose and faster disease progression in newly diagnosed T1D patients, indicating agreement between the experimental and clinical data. In line with these observations, healthy human subjects carrying the T allele have lower β-cell function, which was evaluated by glucose tolerance testing. The data provide strong evidence that CTSH is an important regulator of β-cell function during progression of T1D and reinforce the concept that candidate genes for T1D may affect disease progression by modulating survival and function of pancreatic β-cells, the target cells of the autoimmune assault.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: Transcription factor CEBPA has been widely studied for its involvement in hematopoietic cell differentiation and causal role in hematological malignancies. We demonstrate here that it also performs a causal role in cytokines-induced apoptosis of pancreas β cells. Treatment of two mouse pancreatic α and β cell lines (αTC1-6 and βTC1) with proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IFN-γ, TNF-α, at doses that specifically induce apoptosis of βTC1, significantly increased amount of mRNA and protein encoded by Cebpa and its proapoptotic targets, Arl6ip5 and Tnfrsf10b in βTC1, but not in αTC1-6. Cebpa knockdown in βTC1 significantly decreased cytokines-induced apoptosis, together with the amount of Arl6ip5 and Tnfrsf10b. Analysis of the network comprising CEBPA, its targets, their first interactants and proteins encoded by genes known to regulate cytokines-induced apoptosis in pancreatic β cells (genes from the Apoptotic Machinery and from MAPK and NFkB pathways) revealed that CEBPA, ARL6IP5, TNFRSF10B, TRAF2, UBC are the top five central nodes. In silico analysis further suggests TRAF2 as trait d'union node between CEBPA and the NFkB pathway. Our results strongly suggest that Cebpa is a key regulator within the apoptotic network activated in pancreatic β cells during insulitis, and Arl6ip5, Tnfrsf10b, Traf2, Ubc are key executioners of this program.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Molecular Biology of the Cell
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle is associated with impaired insulin sensitivity in type 2 diabetes. In cardiac myocytes, lipoprotein secretion controlled by apolipoproteinB (apoB) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) affects lipid homeostasis. Design: In this study, we investigated whether expression of a human apoB transgene affects triglyceride accumulation and insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle in fat fed obese mice. Results: Expression of apoB and MTP mRNA and the human apoB transgene was seen in skeletal muscle of the transgene mice. Human apoB transgenic mice accumulated 28% less triglycerides in skeletal myocytes after one year of fat-feeding as compared with WT mice (32 ± 5, n = 10 vs. 44 ± 4 nmol/mg ww, n = 13, p = 0.04). Moreover, expression of human apoB in fat-fed mice was associated with 32% (p = 0.02) and 37% (p = 0.01) lower plasma insulin levels after 9 and 12 months, respectively, improved intra peritoneal glucose tolerance after 6 months, and a trend towards increased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in isolated skeletal muscle. Conclusions: The data suggests that overexpression of apoB decreases skeletal muscle lipid accumulation and attenuates peripheral insulin resistance in obese mice.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2014 · Scandinavian journal of clinical and laboratory investigation
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    ABSTRACT: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease where local release of cytokines such as IL-1β and IFN-γ contribute to β-cell apoptosis. To identify relevant genes regulating this process we performed a meta-analysis of 8 datasets of β-cell gene expression after exposure to IL-1β and IFN-γ. Two of these datasets are novel and contain time-series expressions in human islet cells and rat INS-1E cells. Genes were ranked according to their differential expression within and after 24 hours from exposure, and characterized by function and prior knowledge in the literature. A regulatory network was then inferred from the human time expression datasets, using a time-series extension of a network inference method. The two most differentially expressed genes previously unknown in T1D literature (RIPK2 and ELF3) were found to modulate cytokine-induced apoptosis. The inferred regulatory network is thus supported by the experimental validation, providing a proof-of-concept for the proposed statistical inference approach.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · Genomics
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    ABSTRACT: Type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease characterised by specific T cell-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. Yet, except for insulin, no beta cell-specific antigens have been discovered. This may imply that the autoantigens in type 1 diabetes exist in modified forms capable of specifically triggering beta cell destruction. In other immune-mediated diseases, autoantigens targeted by the immune system have undergone post-translational modification (PTM), thereby creating tissue-specific neo-epitopes. In a similar manner, PTM of beta cell proteins might create beta cell-specific neo-epitopes. We suggest that the current paradigm of type 1 diabetes as a classical autoimmune disease should be reconsidered since the immune response may not be directed against native beta cell proteins. A modified model for the pathogenetic events taking place in islets leading to the T cell attack against beta cells is presented. In this model, PTM plays a prominent role in triggering beta cell destruction. We discuss literature of relevance and perform genetic and human islet gene expression analyses. Both direct and circumstantial support for the involvement of PTM in type 1 diabetes exists in the published literature. Furthermore, we report that cytokines change the expression levels of several genes encoding proteins involved in PTM processes in human islets, and that there are type 1 diabetes-associated polymorphisms in a number of these. In conclusion, data from the literature and presented experimental data support the notion that PTM of beta cell proteins may be involved in triggering beta cell destruction in type 1 diabetes. If the beta cell antigens recognised by the immune system foremost come from modified proteins rather than native ones, the concept of type 1 diabetes as a classical autoimmune disease is open for debate.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · Diabetologia
  • Joachim Storling · Caroline Anna Brorsson
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    ABSTRACT: In type 1 diabetes (T1D), the insulin-producing β cells are destroyed by an immune-mediated process leading to complete insulin deficiency. There is a strong genetic component in T1D. Genes located in the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region are the most important genetic determinants of disease, but more than 40 additional loci are known to significantly affect T1D risk. Since most of the currently known genetic candidates have annotated immune cell functions, it is generally considered that most of the genetic susceptibility in T1D is caused by variation in genes affecting immune cell function. Recent studies, however, indicate that most T1D candidate genes are expressed in human islets suggesting that the functions of the genes are not restricted to immune cells, but also play roles in the islets and possibly the β cells. Several candidates change expression levels within the islets following exposure to proinflammatory cytokines highlighting that these genes may be involved in the response of β cells to immune attack. In this review, the compiling evidence that many of the candidate genes are expressed in islets and β cells will be presented. Further, we perform the first systematic human islet expression analysis of all genes located in 50 T1D-associated GWAS loci using a published RNA sequencing dataset. We find that 336 out of 857 genes are expressed in human islets and that many of these interact in protein networks. Finally, the potential pathogenetic roles of some candidate genes will be discussed.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2013 · Current Diabetes Reports
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    ABSTRACT: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) contribute to target-cell damage in inflammatory and iron-overload diseases. Little is known about iron transport regulation during inflammatory attack. Through a combination of in vitro and in vivo studies, we show that the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β induces divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1) expression correlating with increased β cell iron content and ROS production. Iron chelation and siRNA and genetic knockdown of DMT1 expression reduce cytokine-induced ROS formation and cell death. Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the absence of cytokines in Dmt1 knockout islets is defective, highlighting a physiological role of iron and ROS in the regulation of insulin secretion. Dmt1 knockout mice are protected against multiple low-dose streptozotocin and high-fat diet-induced glucose intolerance, models of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Thus, β cells become prone to ROS-mediated inflammatory damage via aberrant cellular iron metabolism, a finding with potential general cellular implications.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2012 · Cell Metabolism
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    ABSTRACT: Large scale quantitative phosphoproteomics depends upon multidimensional strategies for peptide fractionation, phosphopeptide enrichment, and mass spectrometric analysis. Previously, most robust comprehensive large-scale phosphoproteomics strategies have relied on milligram amounts of protein. We have set up a multi-dimensional phosphoproteomics strategy combining a number of well-established enrichment and fraction methods: An initial TiO(2) phosphopeptide pre-enrichment step is followed by post-fractionation using sequential elution from IMAC (SIMAC) to separate multi- and mono-phosphorylated peptides, and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) of the mono-phosphorylated peptides (collectively abbreviated "TiSH"). The advantages of the strategy include a high specificity and sample preparation workload reduction due to the TiO(2) pre-enrichment step, as well as low adsorptive losses. We demonstrate the capability of this strategy by quantitative investigation of early interferon-γ signaling in low quantities of insulinoma cells. We identified ~6600 unique phosphopeptides from 300μg of peptides/condition (22 unique phosphopeptides/μg) in a duplex dimethyl labeling experiment, with an enrichment specificity>94%. When doing network analysis of putative phosphorylation changes it could be noted that the identified protein interaction network centered upon proteins known to be affected by the interferon-γ pathway, thereby supporting the utility of this global phosphoproteomics strategy. This strategy thus shows great potential for interrogating signaling networks from low amounts of sample with high sensitivity and specificity.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2012 · Journal of proteomics
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    ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have heralded a new era in susceptibility locus discovery in complex diseases. For type 1 diabetes, >40 susceptibility loci have been discovered. However, GWAS do not inevitably lead to identification of the gene or genes in a given locus associated with disease, and they do not typically inform the broader context in which the disease genes operate. Here, we integrated type 1 diabetes GWAS data with protein-protein interactions to construct biological networks of relevance for disease. A total of 17 networks were identified. To prioritize and substantiate these networks, we performed expressional profiling in human pancreatic islets exposed to proinflammatory cytokines. Three networks were significantly enriched for cytokine-regulated genes and, thus, likely to play an important role for type 1 diabetes in pancreatic islets. Eight of the regulated genes (CD83, IFNGR1, IL17RD, TRAF3IP2, IL27RA, PLCG2, MYO1B, and CXCR7) in these networks also harbored single nucleotide polymorphisms nominally associated with type 1 diabetes. Finally, the expression and cytokine regulation of these new candidate genes were confirmed in insulin-secreting INS-1 β-cells. Our results provide novel insight to the mechanisms behind type 1 diabetes pathogenesis and, thus, may provide the basis for the design of novel treatment strategies.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2012 · Diabetes
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    ABSTRACT: Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a complex disease characterized by the loss of insulin-secreting β-cells. Although the disease has a strong genetic component, and several loci are known to increase T1D susceptibility risk, only few causal genes have currently been identified. To identify disease-causing genes in T1D, we performed an in silico "phenome-interactome analysis" on a genome-wide linkage scan dataset. This method prioritizes candidates according to their physical interactions at the protein level with other proteins involved in diabetes. A total of 11 genes were predicted to be likely disease genes in T1D, including the INS gene. An unexpected top-scoring candidate gene was huntingtin-interacting protein (HIP)-14/ZDHHC17. Immunohistochemical analysis of pancreatic sections demonstrated that HIP14 is almost exclusively expressed in insulin-positive cells in islets of Langerhans. RNAi knockdown experiments established that HIP14 is an antiapoptotic protein required for β-cell survival and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IFN-γ) that mediate β-cell dysfunction in T1D down-regulated HIP14 expression in insulin-secreting INS-1 cells and in isolated rat and human islets. Overexpression of HIP14 was associated with a decrease in IL-1β-induced NF-κB activity and protection against IL-1β-mediated apoptosis. Our study demonstrates that the current network biology approach is a valid method to identify genes of importance for T1D and may therefore embody the basis for more rational and targeted therapeutic approaches.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2011 · Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: Apolipoprotein CIII (ApoCIII) is mainly synthesized in the liver and is important for triglyceride metabolism. The plasma concentration of ApoCIII is elevated in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), and in vitro ApoCIII causes apoptosis in pancreatic β-cells in the absence of inflammatory stress. Here, we investigated the effects of ApoCIII on function, signaling, and viability in intact rat pancreatic islets exposed to proinflammatory cytokines to model the intraislet inflammatory milieu in T1D. In contrast to earlier observations in mouse β-cells, exposure of rat islets to ApoCIII alone (50 μg/ml) did not cause apoptosis. In the presence of the islet-cytotoxic cytokines IL-1β + interferon-γ, ApoCIII reduced cytokine-mediated islet cell death and impairment of β-cell function. ApoCIII had no effects on mitogen-activated protein kinases (c-Jun N-terminal kinase, p38, and ERK) and had no impact on IL-1β-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation. However, ApoCIII augmented cytokine-mediated nitric oxide (NO) production and inducible NO synthase expression. Further, ApoCIII caused degradation of the nuclear factor κB-inhibitor inhibitor of κB and stimulated Ser473-phosphorylation of the survival serine-threonine kinase Akt. Inhibition of the Akt signaling pathway by the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase inhibitor LY294002 counteracted the antiapoptotic effect of ApoCIII on cytokine-induced apoptosis. We conclude that ApoCIII in the presence of T1D-relevant proinflammatory cytokines reduces rat pancreatic islet cell apoptosis via Akt.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2011 · Endocrinology

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2011 · Atherosclerosis Supplements
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    ABSTRACT: Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) is a key regulator of the body’s inflammatory response and is produced after infection, injury, and an antigenic challenge. Cloned in 1984, the single polypeptide IL-1β has been shown to exert numerous biological effects. It plays a role in various diseases, including autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, and Type 1 diabetes, as well as in diseases associated with metabolic syndrome such as atherosclerosis, chronic heart failure, and Type 2 diabetes. The macrophage is the primary source of IL-1β, but epidermal, epithelial, lymphoid, and vascular tissues also synthesize IL-1. Recently, IL-1β production and secretion have also been reported from pancreatic islets. Insulin-producing β-cells within the pancreatic islets are specifically prone to IL-β-induced destruction and loss of function. Macrophage-derived IL-1β production in insulin-sensitive organs leads to the progression of inflammation and induction of insulin resistance in obesity. This chapter explains the mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response during diabetes progression with specific attention to the IL-1β signal effects influencing insulin action and insulin secretion . We highlight recent clinical studies, rodent and in vitro experiments with isolated islets using IL-1β as a potential target for the therapy of Type 2 diabetes.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2011 · Handbook of experimental pharmacology
  • Joachim Størling · Regine Bergholdt
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    ABSTRACT: A prerequisite for designing good drugs that perform through clinical development with the final goal to treat human diseases is a detailed understanding of the mechanisms underlying disease. This is particularly true for complex diseases such as diabetes. It has become increasingly clear that complex traits or phenotypes are the result of an interplay between environmental factors and numerous genes and proteins that jointly affect the functionality of biological systems. Since interactions between proteins in networks and pathways make up biological systems, it is essential that we learn more about how networks and pathways are influenced by environmental factors and genetic variation and how such influences cause disease. In this chapter, we will discuss recent data, advancement and ideas on how more valid druggable targets to treat diabetes may be predicted by the application of bioinformatics and systems biology. Keywordsβ-cells-Diabetes aetiology-Drug targets-GWAS-Phenotype description-Protein networks-Systems biology
    No preview · Chapter · Dec 2010
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    ABSTRACT: In type 1 diabetes, inflammatory and immunocompetent cells enter the islet and produce proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), IL-12, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interferon-γ (IFNγ); each contribute to β-cell destruction, mediated in part by nitric oxide. Inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDAC) are used commonly in humans but also possess antiinflammatory and cytokine-suppressing properties. Here we show that oral administration of the HDAC inhibitor ITF2357 to mice normalized streptozotocin (STZ)-induced hyperglycemia at the clinically relevant doses of 1.25-2.5 mg/kg. Serum nitrite levels returned to nondiabetic values, islet function improved and glucose clearance increased from 14% (STZ) to 50% (STZ + ITF2357). In vitro, at 25 and 250 nmol/L, ITF2357 increased islet cell viability, enhanced insulin secretion, inhibited MIP-1α and MIP-2 release, reduced nitric oxide production and decreased apoptosis rates from 14.3% (vehicle) to 2.6% (ITF2357). Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) levels decreased in association with reduced islet-derived nitrite levels. In peritoneal macrophages and splenocytes, ITF2357 inhibited the production of nitrite, as well as that of TNFα and IFNγ at an IC(50) of 25-50 nmol/L. In the insulin-producing INS cells challenged with the combination of IL-1β plus IFNγ, apoptosis was reduced by 50% (P < 0.01). Thus at clinically relevant doses, the orally active HDAC inhibitor ITF2357 favors β-cell survival during inflammatory conditions.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2010 · Molecular Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Since having been cloned in 1984, IL-1beta has been the subject of over 22,000 citations in Pubmed, among them over 800 reviews. This is because of its numerous effects. IL-1beta is a regulator of the body's inflammatory response and is produced after infection, injury, and antigenic challenge. It plays a role in various diseases, including autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases and type 1 diabetes, as well as in diseases associated with metabolic syndrome such as atherosclerosis, chronic heart failure and type 2 diabetes. Macrophage are the primary source of IL-1, but epidermal, epithelial, lymphoid and vascular tissues also synthesize IL-1. IL-1beta production and secretion have also been reported from pancreatic islets. Insulin-producing beta-cells within pancreatic islets are specifically prone to IL-beta-induced destruction and loss of function. Macrophage-derived IL-1beta production in insulin-sensitive organs, leads to progression of inflammation and induction of insulin resistance in obesity. We summarize the mechanisms involved in inflammation and specifically the IL-1beta signals that lead to the progression of insulin resistance and diabetes. We highlight recent clinical studies and experiments in animals and isolated islets using IL-1beta as a potential target for the therapy of type 2 diabetes.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2009 · Expert opinion on biological therapy

Publication Stats

2k Citations
219.90 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013-2015
    • University of Copenhagen Herlev Hospital
      Herlev, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 2011-2014
    • Glostrup Hospital
      København, Capital Region, Denmark
  • 2003-2011
    • Steno Diabetes Center
      • Epidemiology
      Gjentofte, Capital Region, Denmark