Jenni Adams

University of Canterbury, Christchurch, Canterbury, New Zealand

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Publications (8)30.86 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Cosmological inflation generates primordial density perturbations on all scales, including those far too small to contribute to the cosmic microwave background. At these scales, isolated ultracompact minihalos of dark matter can form, well before standard structure formation, if the small-scale perturbations have a large enough amplitude. Such minihalos affect pulsar timing observations and are potentially bright sources of gamma rays. The resulting constraints significantly extend the observable window of inflation and dark matter, simultaneously probing two of the greatest puzzles in modern cosmology.
    Preview · Article · Dec 2015
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we report the results of a γ-ray study of IceCube's extraterrestrial neutrino candidates detected as track-like events. Using 70 months of Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations, a likelihood analysis of all 1–300 GeV photons within 5° of the track-like neutrino candidates’ origin was undertaken, to search for spatially coincident γ-ray emission. One of IceCube's HESE (High Energy Starting Event) track events was found to be spatially coincident with a γ-ray bright active galactic nucleus (AGN), PKS 0723-008. We find however that the chance probability for Fermi-LAT detected AGN to be spatially coincident with a single HESE track-like event is high (∼37 per cent). We therefore find no evidence of γ-ray emission associated with the detection of IceCube's HESE track-like neutrino candidates. Upper limits were calculated in the energy range of 1–300 GeV, assuming a point source origin for the neutrino events considered. The implications for the non-detection of γ-ray emission from the source of the HESE track-like events are briefly discussed. The large time period analysed in our study did however reveal two new γ-ray point sources. With a flux of (1.28 ± 0.08) × 10−9 photons cm−2 s−1, in the 1–300 GeV energy range, and an associated TS value of 220.6, one of these new point sources is positionally coincident with the AGN PKS 1346-112. The other point source has a 1–300 GeV flux of (7.95 ± 1.23) × 10−10 photons cm−2 s−1 and an associated TS value of 92.4. This new point source is spatially coincident with the radio source NVSS J072534 + 021645 suggesting that it too is an AGN.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    ABSTRACT: We analyse the sensitivity of IceCube-DeepCore to annihilation of neutralino dark matter in the solar core, generated within a 25 parameter version of the minimally supersymmetric standard model (MSSM-25). We explore the 25-dimensional parameter space using scanning methods based on importance sampling and using DarkSUSY 5.0.6 to calculate observables. Our scans produced a database of 6.02 million parameter space points with neutralino dark matter consistent with the relic density implied by WMAP 7-year data, as well as with accelerator searches. We performed a model exclusion analysis upon these points using the expected capabilities of the IceCube-DeepCore Neutrino Telescope. We show that IceCube-DeepCore will be sensitive to a number of models that are not accessible to direct detection experiments such as SIMPLE, COUPP and XENON100, indirect detection using Fermi-LAT observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies, nor to current LHC searches.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2012 · Journal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics
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    ABSTRACT: Based on three years of Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) gamma-ray data of the Virgo cluster, evidence for an extended emission associated with dark matter pair annihilation in the b b-bar channel has been reported by Han et al. [1]. After an in depth spatial and temporal analysis, we argue that the tentative evidence for a gamma-ray excess from the Virgo cluster is mainly due to the appearance of a population of previously unresolved gamma-ray point sources in the region of interest. These point sources are not part of the LAT second source catalogue (2FGL), but are found to be above the standard detection significance threshold when three or more years of LAT data is included.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2012 · Physical review D: Particles and fields
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    Anthony M. Brown · Jenni Adams
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    ABSTRACT: We report the discovery of high-energy γ-ray emission from the broad-line radio galaxy (BLRG) Pictor A with a significance of ∼ 5.8σ [test statistic (TS) = 33.4], based on three years of observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detector. The three-year-averaged E > 0.2 GeV γ-ray spectrum is adequately described by a power law, with a photon index, Γ, of 2.93 ± 0.03 and a resultant integrated flux of Fγ= (5.8 ± 0.7) × 10−9 photons cm−2 s−1. A temporal investigation of the observed γ-ray flux, which binned the flux into year-long intervals, reveals that the flux in the third year was 50 per cent higher than the three-year-averaged flux. This observation, coupled with the fact that this source was not detected in the first two years of Fermi-LAT observations, suggests variability on time-scales of a year or less. Synchrotron self-Compton modelling of the spectral energy distribution of a prominent hotspot in Pictor A’s western radio lobe is performed. It is found that the models in which the γ-ray emission originates within the lobes predict an X-ray flux larger than that observed. Given that the X-ray emission in the radio lobe hotspots has been resolved with the current suite of X-ray detectors, we suggest that the γ-ray emission from Pictor A originates from within its jet, which is in agreement with other γ-ray-loud BLRGs. This suggestion is consistent with the evidence that the γ-ray flux is variable on time-scales of a year or less.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2011 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
  • Giles Reid · Jenni Adams · Suruj Seunarine
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    ABSTRACT: Using a Kolmogorov turbulence model, we investigate the effects of fluctuations in matter and neutrino density in the region near a supernova core on the flavor oscillations of neutrinos emitted in the core collapse in a single-angle, two-flavor approximation. Deviation from a smooth background neutrino density causes significant alterations in the final flavor state of the neutrino ensemble after 400 km, but even very large fluctuations in the matter density do not strongly affect the state of the neutrinos after the collective phase. In both cases, there is a strong effect on the neutrino flavor evolution at intermediate radii, with the flavor evolution becoming much more chaotic. The effect of fluctuations also depends strongly on the initial neutrino spectra. We conclude that the true neutrino fluxes arriving at Earth from core-collapse supernova could differ considerably from predictions of neutrino fluxes based on approximate models with smoothly decreasing matter and neutrino densities.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2011 · Physical review D: Particles and fields
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    Anthony M. Brown · Jenni Adams
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    ABSTRACT: We report on our study of the high-energy γ-ray emission from the Fanaroff–Riley type I (FR I) radio galaxy NGC 1275, based on 2 yr of observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) detector. Previous Fermi studies of NGC 1275 had found evidence for spectral and flux variability on monthly time-scales during the first year of Fermi-LAT observations. This variability is also seen in the larger 2-yr data set, during which we observe a large γ-ray flare (2010 June–August). The increased photon statistics from this large flare have allowed the discovery of flux variability from NGC 1275 on the time-scales of days. The largest flux variation observed during this flare being a factor of ∼3 from 1 day to the next and a resultant e-folding rise time of 1.51 ± 0.2 d. The 2-yr-averaged E > 100 MeV γ-ray spectrum is adequately described by a power-law spectrum, with a photon index, Γ, of 2.09 ± 0.02, and a resultant integrated flux of Fγ= (2.2 ± 0.1) × 10−7 photon cm−2 s−1. While no hysteresis was observed in the photon index–flux (Γγ versus Fγ) parameter space, there was obvious ‘harder-when-brighter’ behaviour observed during the large γ-ray flare. Furthermore, during this large flare, NGC 1275 appeared to migrate from the FR I radio galaxy to the BL Lac object region of the photon index–luminosity (Γγ versus Lγ) paramater space. In this paper, we present details of our Fermi-LAT analysis of NGC 1275, including a brief discussion on its implications for γ-ray blazar sources.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2011 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    Anthony M. Brown · Jenni Adams
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    ABSTRACT: We report on our study of the high-energy $\gamma-$ray emission from the FR I radio galaxy NGC 1275, based on two years of observations with the Fermi-LAT detector. Previous Fermi studies of NGC 1275 had found evidence for spectral and flux variability on monthly timescales during the first year of Fermi-LAT observations. This variability is also seen in the larger two year data set, during which we observe a large $\gamma-$ray flare (June-August 2010). The increased photon statistics from this large flare have allowed the discovery of flux variability from NGC 1275 on the timescales of days. The largest flux variation observed during this flare being a factor of $\sim 3$ from one day to the next and a resultant $e$-folding risetime of $1.51\pm0.2$ days. The two year averaged $E>$100 MeV $\gamma-$ray spectrum is adequately described by a power-law spectrum, with a photon index, $\Gamma$, of $2.09 \pm 0.02$, and a resultant integrated flux of $F_{\gamma}=(2.2\pm0.1) \times 10^{-7}$ ph cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$. While no hysteresis was observed in the photon index$-$flux ($\Gamma_{\gamma}$ vs F$_{\gamma}$) parameter space, there was obvious `harder-when-brighter' behaviour observed during the large $\gamma-$ray flare. Furthermore, during this large flare, NGC 1275 appeared to migrate from the FR I radio galaxy to the BL Lac object region of the photon index$-$luminosity ($\Gamma_{\gamma}$ vs L$_{\gamma}$) paramater space. In this paper we present details of our Fermi-LAT analysis of NGC 1275, including a brief discussion on its implications for $\gamma-$ray blazar sources.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2011