Heidi Krause-Steinrauf

George Washington University, Washington, Washington, D.C., United States

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Publications (47)439.68 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: We assessed whether type 1 diabetes (T1D) can be diagnosed earlier using a new approach based on prediction and natural history in autoantibody-positive individuals. Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1) and TrialNet Natural History Study (TNNHS) participants were studied. A metabolic index, the T1D Diagnostic Index60 (Index60), was developed from 2-h oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) using the log fasting C-peptide, 60-min C-peptide, and 60-min glucose. OGTTs with Index60 ≥2.00 and 2-h glucose <200 mg/dL (Ind60+Only) were compared with Index60 <2.00 and 2-h glucose ≥200 mg/dL (2hglu+Only) OGTTs as criteria for T1D. Individuals were assessed for C-peptide loss from the first Ind60+Only OGTT to diagnosis. Areas under receiver operating characteristic curves were significantly higher for Index60 than for the 2-h glucose (P < 0.001 for both DPT-1 and the TNNHS). As a diagnostic criterion, sensitivity was higher for Ind60+Only than for 2hglu+Only (0.44 vs. 0.15 in DPT-1; 0.26 vs. 0.17 in the TNNHS) OGTTs. Specificity was somewhat higher for 2hglu+Only OGTTs in DPT-1 (0.97 vs. 0.91) but equivalent in the TNNHS (0.98 for both). Positive and negative predictive values were higher for Ind60+Only OGTTs in both studies. Postchallenge C-peptide levels declined significantly at each OGTT time point from the first Ind60+Only OGTT to the time of standard diagnosis (range -22 to -34% in DPT-1 and -14 to -27% in the TNNHS). C-peptide and glucose patterns differed markedly between Ind60+Only and 2hglu+Only OGTTs. An approach based on prediction and natural history appears to have utility for diagnosing T1D. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · Diabetes Care
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE The epidemic of type 2 diabetes (T2DM) threatens to become the major public health problem of this century. However, a comprehensive comparison of the long-term effects of medications to treat T2DM has not been conducted. GRADE, a pragmatic, unmasked clinical trial, aims to compare commonly used diabetes medications, when combined with metformin, on glycemia-lowering effectiveness and patient-centered outcomes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS GRADE was designed with support from a U34 planning grant from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). The consensus protocol was approved by NIDDK and the GRADE Research Group. Eligibility criteria for the 5,000 metformin-treated subjects include <5 years' diabetes duration, ≥30 years of age at time of diagnosis, and baseline hemoglobin A1c (A1C) of 6.8–8.5% (51–69 mmol/mol). Medications representing four classes (sulfonylureas, dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors, glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonists, and insulin) will be randomly assigned and added to metformin (minimum–maximum 1,000–2,000 mg/day). The primary metabolic outcome is the time to primary failure defined as an A1C ≥7% (53 mmol/mol), subsequently confirmed, over an anticipated mean observation period of 4.8 years (range 4–7 years). Other long-term metabolic outcomes include the need for the addition of basal insulin after a confirmed A1C >7.5% (58 mmol/mol) and, ultimately, the need to implement an intensive basal/bolus insulin regimen. The four drugs will also be compared with respect to selected microvascular complications, cardiovascular disease risk factors, adverse effects, tolerability, quality of life, and cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS GRADE will compare the long-term effectiveness of major glycemia-lowering medications and provide guidance to clinicians about the most appropriate medications to treat T2DM. GRADE begins recruitment at 37 centers in the U.S. in 2013.
    Preview · Article · Jul 2013 · Diabetes Care
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    ABSTRACT: We studied the change in the first-phase insulin response (FPIR) during the progression to type 1 diabetes (T1D). Seventy-four oral insulin trial progressors to T1D of the Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 with at least one FPIR measurement after baseline and before diagnosis were studied. The FPIR was examined longitudinally in 26 progressors who had FPIR measurements during each of the 3 years before diagnosis. The association between the change from the baseline FPIR to the last FPIR and time to diagnosis was studied in the remainder (n=48). The 74 progressors had lower baseline FPIR values than non-progressors (n=270) with adjustments for age and BMI. In the longitudinal analysis of the 26 progressors, there was a greater decline in the FPIR from 1.5 to 0.5 years before diagnosis than from 2.5 to 1.5 years before diagnosis. This accelerated decline was also evident in a regression analysis of the 48 remaining progressors in whom the rate of decline became more marked with the approaching diagnosis. The patterns of decline were similar between the longitudinal and regression analyses. There is an acceleration of decline in the FPIR during the progression to T1D which becomes especially marked between 1.5 and 0.5 years before diagnosis.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2013 · Diabetes
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    Full-text · Article · Jul 2013
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives. To assess the morbidity of herpes viruses in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D) enrolled in immunosuppressive treatment studies.Methods. EBV, CMV, HSV and VZV infections were monitored in 126 participants of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of daclizumab (DZB) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) including DZB+MMF+, DZB-MMF+, DZB+MMF- and DZB-MMF-. During the 2-year follow-up, herpesviral infections were monitored clinically, by serology and blood DNA PCR.Results and Conclusions. Among 57 baseline EBV-seronegative participants, 9 developed EBV primary infections, including 2 with infectious mononucleosis syndrome. There were no appreciable differences in the course of the primary EBV infections across treatment groups. Among 69 baseline EBV-seropositive participants, 22 had virologic reactivations, including one symptomatic DZB-MMF+ subject. Compared with 7 DZB-MMF- EBV reactivators, the 9 DZB+MMF+ reactivators tended to have more prolonged viremia (11.4 vs. 4.4 months; p=0.06) and higher cumulative viral burden (14.2 vs. 12.5 log EBV c/ml; p=0.06). Four of 85 baseline CMV-seronegative subjects developed asymptomatic primary CMV infections. There were no CMV reactivations. Of 30 baseline HSV-seropositive subjects, 8 developed ≥1 episode of herpes labialis; 1 subject had a primary HSV infection; and 1 subject without baseline serology information had a new diagnosis of genital HSV. There were no significant differences in the incidence of HSV recurrences across treatment groups. Of 100 baseline VZV-seropositive subjects, one DZB-MMF- subject developed herpes zoster and one DZB-MMF+ subject had Bell's palsy possibly related to VZV. In conclusion, DZB ±MMF was not associated with increased morbidity due to herpes viruses.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2012 · Clinical Infectious Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Interpretation of clinical trials to alter the decline in β-cell function after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes depends on a robust understanding of the natural history of disease. Combining data from the Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet studies, we describe the natural history of β-cell function from shortly after diagnosis through 2 years post study randomization, assess the degree of variability between patients, and investigate factors that may be related to C-peptide preservation or loss. We found that 93% of individuals have detectable C-peptide 2 years from diagnosis. In 11% of subjects, there was no significant fall from baseline by 2 years. There was a biphasic decline in C-peptide; the C-peptide slope was -0.0245 pmol/mL/month (95% CI -0.0271 to -0.0215) through the first 12 months and -0.0079 (-0.0113 to -0.0050) from 12 to 24 months (P < 0.001). This pattern of fall in C-peptide over time has implications for understanding trial results in which effects of therapy are most pronounced early and raises the possibility that there are time-dependent differences in pathophysiology. The robust data on the C-peptide obtained under clinical trial conditions should be used in planning and interpretation of clinical trials.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2012 · Diabetes
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    ABSTRACT: We assessed diabetes risk associated with zinc transporter-8 antibodies (ZnT8A), islet cell antibodies (ICA), and HLA type and age in relatives of people with type 1 diabetes with the standard biochemical autoantibodies (BAA) to insulin (IAA), GAD65 (GAD65A), and/or insulinoma-associated protein 2 antigen (IA-2A). For this analysis, 2,256 relatives positive for at least one BAA, of whom 142 developed diabetes, were tested for ZnT8A, ICA, and HLA genotype followed by biannual oral glucose tolerance tests. ZnT8A were also tested in 911 randomly chosen antibody-negative relatives. ZnT8A were associated with the other BAA (548 of 2,256 [24.3%] BAA(+) vs. 8 of 911 [0.8%] BAA(-), P < 0.001) and BAA number (177 of 1,683 [10.5%] single-, 221 of 384 [57.6%] double-, and 150 of 189 [79.4%] triple-BAA positivity, P < 0.001). The 4-year diabetes risk was higher in single BAA(+) relatives with ZnT8A than ZnT8A(-) relatives (31 vs. 7%, P < 0.001). In multivariable analysis, age ≤ 20 years (hazard ratio 2.13, P = 0.03), IA-2A (2.15, P = 0.005), IAA (1.73, P = 0.01), ICA (2.37, P = 0.002), and ZnT8A (1.87, P = 0.03) independently predicted diabetes, whereas HLA type (high and moderate vs. low risk) and GAD65A did not (P = 0.81 and 0.86, respectively). In relatives with one standard BAA, ZnT8A identified a subset at higher diabetes risk. ZnT8A predicted diabetes independently of ICA, the standard BAA, age, and HLA type. ZnT8A should be included in type 1 diabetes prediction and prevention studies.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2012 · Diabetes care
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    ABSTRACT: B-lymphocyte depletion with rituximab has been shown to benefit patients with various autoimmune diseases. We have previously demonstrated that this benefit is also apparent in patients with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. The effect of rituximab on in vivo antibody responses, particularly during the period of B-lymphocyte depletion, is incompletely determined. This study was designed to assess this knowledge void. In patients with recent-onset type 1 diabetes treated with rituximab (n = 46) or placebo (n = 29), antibody responses to neoantigen phiX174 during B-lymphocyte depletion and with hepatitis A (as a second neoantigen) and tetanus/diphtheria (as recall antigens) after B-lymphocyte recovery were studied. Anti- tetanus, diphtheria, mumps, measles, and rubella titers were measured before and after treatment by means of ELISA. Antibody titers and percentage IgM versus percentage IgG to phiX174 were measured by means of phage neutralization. B-lymphocyte subsets were determined by means of flow cytometry. No change occurred in preexisting antibody titers. Tetanus/diphtheria and hepatitis A immunization responses were protective in the rituximab-treated subjects, although significantly blunted compared with those seen in the controls subjects, when immunized at the time of B-lymphocyte recovery. Anti-phiX174 responses were severely reduced during the period of B-lymphocyte depletion, but with B-lymphocyte recovery, anti-phiX174 responses were within the normal range. During the time of B-lymphocyte depletion, rituximab recipients had a decreased antibody response to neoantigens and significantly lower titers after recall immunization with diphtheria and tetanus toxoid. With recovery, immune responses return toward normal. Immunization during the time of B-lymphocyte depletion, although ineffective, does not preclude a subsequent response to the antigen.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2011 · The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology
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    ABSTRACT: Type 1 diabetes mellitus is believed to be due to the autoimmune destruction of β-cells by T lymphocytes, but a single course of rituximab, a monoclonal anti-CD20 B lymphocyte Ab, can attenuate C-peptide loss over the first year of disease. The effects of B cell depletion on disease-associated T cell responses have not been studied. We compare changes in lymphocyte subsets, T cell proliferative responses to disease-associated target Ags, and C-peptide levels of participants who did (responders) or did not (nonresponders) show signs of β-cell preservation 1 y after rituximab therapy in a placebo-controlled TrialNet trial. Rituximab decreased B lymphocyte levels after four weekly doses of mAb. T cell proliferative responses to diabetes-associated Ags were present at baseline in 75% of anti-CD20- and 82% of placebo-treated subjects and were not different over time. However, in rituximab-treated subjects with significant C-peptide preservation at 6 mo (58%), the proliferative responses to diabetes-associated total (p = 0.032), islet-specific (p = 0.048), and neuronal autoantigens (p = 0.005) increased over the 12-mo observation period. This relationship was not seen in placebo-treated patients. We conclude that in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus, anti-B cell mAb causes increased proliferative responses to diabetes Ags and attenuated β-cell loss. The way in which these responses affect the disease course remains unknown.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2011 · The Journal of Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: The TrialNet Study Group evaluated rituximab, a B-cell-depleting monoclonal antibody, for its effect in new-onset patients with type 1A diabetes. Rituximab decreased the loss of C-peptide over the first year of follow-up and markedly depleted B lymphocytes for 6 months after administration. This article analyzes the specific effect of rituximab on multiple islet autoantibodies. A total of 87 patients between the ages of 8 and 40 years received either rituximab or a placebo infusion weekly for four doses close to the onset of diabetes. Autoantibodies to insulin (IAAs), GAD65 (GADAs), insulinoma-associated protein 2 (IA2As), and ZnT8 (ZnT8As) were measured with radioimmunoassays. The primary outcome for this autoantibody analysis was the mean level of autoantibodies during follow-up. Rituximab markedly suppressed IAAs compared with the placebo injection but had a much smaller effect on GADAs, IA2As, and ZnT8As. A total of 40% (19 of 48) of rituximab-treated patients who were IAA positive became IAA negative versus 0 of 29 placebo-treated patients (P < 0.0001). In the subgroup (n = 6) treated within 50 days of diabetes, IAAs were markedly suppressed by rituximab in all patients for 1 year and for four patients as long as 3 years despite continuing insulin therapy. Independent of rituximab treatment, the mean level of IAAs at study entry was markedly lower (P = 0.035) for patients who maintained C-peptide levels during the first year of follow-up in both rituximab-treated and placebo groups. A single course of rituximab differentially suppresses IAAs, clearly blocking IAAs for >1 year in insulin-treated patients. For the patients receiving insulin for >2 weeks prior to rituximab administration, we cannot assess whether rituximab not only blocks the acquisition of insulin antibodies induced by insulin administration and/or also suppresses preformed insulin autoantibodies. Studies in prediabetic non-insulin-treated patients will likely be needed to evaluate the specific effects of rituximab on levels of IAAs.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2011 · Diabetes
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    ABSTRACT: Background The immunopathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with T-cell autoimmunity. To be fully active, immune T cells need a co-stimulatory signal in addition to the main antigen-driven signal. Abatacept modulates co-stimulation and prevents full T-cell activation. We evaluated the eff ect of abatacept in recent-onset type 1 diabetes. Methods In this multicentre, double-blind, randomised controlled trial, patients aged 6–45 years recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes were randomly assigned (2:1) to receive abatacept (10 mg/kg, maximum 1000 mg per dose) or placebo infusions intravenously on days 1, 14, 28, and monthly for a total of 27 infusions over 2 years. Computer-generated permuted block randomisation was used, with a block size of 3 and stratifi ed by participating site. Neither patients nor research personnel were aware of treatment assignments. The primary outcome was baseline-adjusted geometric mean 2-h area-under-the-curve (AUC) serum C-peptide concentration after a mixed-meal tolerance test at 2 years' follow-up. Analysis was by intention to treat for all patients for whom data were available. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00505375. Findings 112 patients were assigned to treatment groups (77 abatacept, 35 placebo). Adjusted C-peptide AUC was 59% (95% CI 6·1–112) higher at 2 years with abatacept (n=73, 0·378 nmol/L) than with placebo (n=30, 0·238 nmol/L; p=0·0029). The diff erence between groups was present throughout the trial, with an estimated 9·6 months' delay (95% CI 3·47–15·6) in C-peptide reduction with abatacept. There were few infusion-related adverse events (36 reactions occurred in 17 [22%] patients on abatacept and 11 reactions in six [17%] on placebo). There was no increase in infections (32 [42%] patients on abatacept vs 15 [43%] on placebo) or neutropenia (seven [9%] vs fi ve [14%]). Interpretation Co-stimulation modulation with abatacept slowed reduction in β-cell function over 2 years. The benefi cial eff ect suggests that T-cell activation still occurs around the time of clinical diagnosis of type 1 diabetes. Yet, despite continued administration of abatacept over 24 months, the decrease in β-cell function with abatacept was parallel to that with placebo after 6 months of treatment, causing us to speculate that T-cell activation lessens with time. Further observation will establish whether the benefi cial eff ect continues after cessation of abatacept infusions.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2011 · The Lancet
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    ABSTRACT: We assessed whether differing autoantibody screening criteria for type 1 diabetes (T1D) prevention trials result in different baseline metabolic profiles of those who screen positive. Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1) participants were screened for islet cell autoantibodies, whereas TrialNet Natural History Study (TNNHS) participants were screened for biochemical autoantibodies. In both studies, those determined to be autoantibody positive underwent baseline oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) in which glucose and C-peptide were measured. The percentage of those with an OGTT in the diabetic range was higher among the DPT-1 participants (10.0% of 956 vs. 6.4% of 645, p < 0.01). In a logistic regression analysis with adjustments for age and gender, the difference persisted (p < 0.01). Among those in the non-diabetic range (n = 860 for DPT-1 and n = 604 for the TNNHS), glucose levels were similar at all time points, except for higher fasting glucose levels in the TNNHS participants (p < 0.001). There was a higher percentage of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) in the TNNHS participants (10.9 vs. 6.7%, p < 0.01); however, with adjustments for age and gender, there was no longer a significant difference. There was no significant difference in the percentages with impaired glucose tolerance. C-peptide levels were much lower in the DPT-1 cohort at all OGTT time points (p < 0.001 for all). Differing criteria for autoantibody screening can result in marked differences in the baseline metabolic profiles of prospective participants of T1D prevention trials.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2011 · Pediatric Diabetes

  • No preview · Article · Dec 2010 · Clinical Immunology
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    ABSTRACT: This trial tested whether mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) alone or with daclizumab (DZB) could arrest the loss of insulin-producing beta-cells in subjects with new-onset type 1 diabetes. A multi-center, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-masked trial was initiated by Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet at 13 sites in North America and Europe. Subjects diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and with sufficient C-peptide within 3 months of diagnosis were randomized to either MMF alone, MMF plus DZB, or placebo, and then followed for 2 years. The primary outcome was the geometric mean area under the curve (AUC) C-peptide from the 2-h mixed meal tolerance test. One hundred and twenty-six subjects were randomized and treated during the trial. The geometric mean C-peptide AUC at 2 years was unaffected by MMF alone or MMF plus DZB versus placebo. Adverse events were more frequent in the active therapy groups relative to the control group, but not significantly. Neither MMF alone nor MMF in combination with DZB had an effect on the loss of C-peptide in subjects with new-onset type 1 diabetes. Higher doses or more targeted immunotherapies may be needed to affect the autoimmune process.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2010 · Diabetes care
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    ABSTRACT: The immunopathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus is associated with T-lymphocyte autoimmunity. However, there is growing evidence that B lymphocytes play a role in many T-lymphocyte-mediated diseases. It is possible to achieve selective depletion of B lymphocytes with rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody. This phase 2 study evaluated the role of B-lymphocyte depletion in patients with type 1 diabetes. We conducted a randomized, double-blind study in which 87 patients between 8 and 40 years of age who had newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes were assigned to receive infusions of rituximab or placebo on days 1, 8, 15, and 22 of the study. The primary outcome, assessed 1 year after the first infusion, was the geometric mean area under the curve (AUC) for the serum C-peptide level during the first 2 hours of a mixed-meal tolerance test. Secondary outcomes included safety and changes in the glycated hemoglobin level and insulin dose. At 1 year, the mean AUC for the level of C peptide was significantly higher in the rituximab group than in the placebo group. The rituximab group also had significantly lower levels of glycated hemoglobin and required less insulin. Between 3 months and 12 months, the rate of decline in C-peptide levels in the rituximab group was significantly less than that in the placebo group. CD19+ B lymphocytes were depleted in patients in the rituximab group, but levels increased to 69% of baseline values at 12 months. More patients in the rituximab group than in the placebo group had adverse events, mostly grade 1 or grade 2, after the first infusion. The reactions appeared to be minimal with subsequent infusions. There was no increase in infections or neutropenia with rituximab. A four-dose course of rituximab partially preserved beta-cell function over a period of 1 year in patients with type 1 diabetes. The finding that B lymphocytes contribute to the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes may open a new pathway for exploration in the treatment of patients with this condition. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00279305.)
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2009 · New England Journal of Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Adrenergic activation is an important determinant of outcomes in chronic heart failure. Adrenergic activity is regulated in part by prejunctional alpha(2C)-adrenergic receptors (ARs), which exhibit genetic variation in humans. Bucindolol is a novel beta-AR blocking agent that also lowers systemic norepinephrine and thus is also a sympatholytic agent. This study investigated whether alpha(2C)-AR polymorphisms affect sympatholytic effects of bucindolol in patients with heart failure. In the beta-Blocker Evaluation of Survival Trial, adrenergic activation was estimated by systemic venous norepinephrine measured at baseline, 3 months, and 12 months posttreatment in patients treated with placebo or bucindolol. In the beta-Blocker Evaluation of Survival Trial AR polymorphism substudy, DNA was collected from 1040 of the 2708 randomized patients, and alpha(2C)-AR gene polymorphisms (alpha(2C) Del322-325 or the wild-type counterpart) were measured by polymerase chain reaction and gel electrophoresis. Patients who were alpha(2C) Del carriers (heterozygotes or homozygotes) exhibited a much greater sympatholytic response to bucindolol (decrease in norepinephrine at 3 months of 153+/-57 pg/mL, P=0.012 compared with placebo versus decrease of 50+/-13 pg/mL in alpha(2C) wild type, P=0.0005 versus placebo; P=0.010 by interaction test). alpha(2C) Del carriers had no evidence of a favorable survival benefit from bucindolol (mortality compared with placebo hazard ratio, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.57 to 2.08; P=0.80), whereas bucindolol-treated subjects who were wild type for the alpha(2C)-AR had a 30% reduction in mortality (hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% CI, 0.51 to 0.96; P=0.025). In the beta-Blocker Evaluation of Survival Trial AR polymorphism substudy, the norepinephrine lowering and clinical therapeutic responses to bucindolol were strongly influenced by alpha(2C) receptor genotype.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2009 · Circulation Heart Failure
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    ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to describe a pilot trial of using an omega-3 fatty acid (docosahexaenoic acid [DHA]) to prevent islet cell autoimmunity in infants with an increased risk for developing type 1 diabetes (T1D). Infants from pregnant mothers who either have T1D (or the father or a previous child has T1D) and who entered the study in the third trimester or infants younger than age 5 months having a first-degree family member with T1D were eligible for the study. Infants from either group also had to have an increased genetic (HLA) risk for T1D (or multiple first-degree relatives with T1D) to be eligible. The study is a multicenter, 2-arm, randomized, double-masked clinical trial that will last 4 years (1 year of recruitment and 3 years of treatment). Treatment with DHA (or control) began in the last trimester of pregnancy or in the first 5 months after birth. Inflammatory mediators, including cytokines, chemokines, eicosanoids, and C-reactive protein, are being measured along with fatty acids in maternal and infant blood. Ninety-eight infants were enrolled (41 during pregnancy and 57 in the 5 months after birth). HLA results of the 97 eligible infants (1 infant had a protective 0602 allele and was thus ineligible) showed that 90 have DR3 and/or DR4. Seven infants were enrolled without DR3/4 but who instead had multiple first-degree relatives with T1D. Compliance has been excellent, and no families have discontinued participation. Intervention trials in this high-risk group are feasible but require significant effort to identify potential participants.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2009 · ICAN Infant Child & Adolescent Nutrition
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    ABSTRACT: TrialNet's goal to test preventions for type 1 diabetes has created an opportunity to gain new insights into the natural history of pre-type 1 diabetes. The TrialNet Natural History Study (NHS) will assess the predictive value of existing and novel risk markers for type 1 diabetes and will find subjects for prevention trials. The NHS is a three-phase, prospective cohort study. In phase 1 (screening), pancreatic autoantibodies (glutamic acid decarboxylase, insulin, ICA-512, and islet cell antibodies) are measured. Phase 2 (baseline risk assessment) includes oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) in antibody-positive subjects and estimation of 5-yr diabetes risks according to the OGTT and number of confirmed positive antibody tests. Phase 3 (follow-up risk assessments) requires OGTTs every 6 months. In phases 2 and 3, samples are collected for future tests of T-lymphocyte function, autoantibody isotypes, RNA gene expression, and proteomics. The primary outcome is diabetes onset. Of 12 636 relatives screened between March 2004 and December 2006, 605 (4.8%) were positive for at least one biochemical antibody. Of these, 322 were confirmed antibody positive and completed phase 2, of whom 296 subjects were given preliminary 5-yr diabetes risks of <25% (n = 132), > or =25% (n = 36), and > or =50% (n = 128) where the latter two categories represent different subjects based on number of confirmed positive antibodies (2, > or =25%; 3 or more, > or =50%) and/or an abnormal OGTT (> or =50%). The NHS is identifying potential prevention trial subjects and is assembling a large cohort that will provide new natural history information about pre-type 1 diabetes. Follow-up to diabetes will help establish the biological significance and clinical value of novel type 1 diabetes risk markers.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2008 · Pediatric Diabetes
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    ABSTRACT: Serial neurohormones may serve as markers of efficacy of congestive heart failure (CHF) therapy. We measured serial plasma big-endothelin (Big-ET), ET-1, N-terminal atrial natriuretic peptide, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in 206 patients randomized to bucindolol or placebo in Beta-Blocker Evaluation of Survival Trial (BEST). Neurohormones were measured at baseline and 3 and 12 months. At baseline, BNP and Big-ET levels were greater in New York Heart Association (NYHA) Class IV than in Class III patients (median 122 pg/mL versus 447 pg/mL, P = .001; and 20.0 pg/mL versus 9.9 pg/mL, P = .003), and in patients with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) < or = 20% compared with LVEF > 20% (median 211 pg/mL versus 99.1 pg/mL; and 12.9 pg/mL versus 8.0 pg/mL, both P = .003). Big-ET and BNP were the strongest predictors of the composite end point of CHF hospitalization or death. LVEF at 12 months correlated inversely with 12-month BNP levels (r = -0.41, P = .0001). Bucindolol had no effect on neurohormones except that bucindolol treated patients had lower Big-ET levels at 3 months than patients receiving placebo (median 9.1 pg/mL versus 10.9 pg/mL, P = .05). A decline in ET-1 was associated with increased risk of the composite endpoint. Lack of effect of bucindolol on natriuretic peptide levels appears consistent with its overall lack of efficacy in BEST.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2007 · Journal of cardiac failure
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    ABSTRACT: Heterogeneity of heart failure (HF) phenotypes indicates contributions from underlying common polymorphisms. We considered polymorphisms in the beta(1)-adrenergic receptor (beta(1)AR), a beta-blocker target, as candidate pharmacogenomic loci. Transfected cells, genotyped human nonfailing and failing ventricles, and a clinical trial were used to ascertain phenotype and mechanism. In nonfailing and failing isolated ventricles, beta(1)-Arg-389 had respective 2.8 +/- 0.3- and 4.3 +/- 2.1-fold greater agonist-promoted contractility vs. beta(1)-Gly-389, defining enhanced physiologic coupling under relevant conditions of endogenous expression and HF. The beta-blocker bucindolol was an inverse agonist in failing Arg, but not Gly, ventricles, without partial agonist activity at either receptor; carvedilol was a genotype-independent neutral antagonist. In transfected cells, bucindolol antagonized agonist-stimulated cAMP, with a greater absolute decrease observed for Arg-389 (435 +/- 80 vs. 115 +/- 23 fmol per well). Potential pathophysiologic correlates were assessed in a placebo-controlled trial of bucindolol in 1,040 HF patients. No outcome was associated with genotype in the placebo group, indicating little impact on the natural course of HF. However, the Arg-389 homozygotes treated with bucindolol had an age-, sex-, and race-adjusted 38% reduction in mortality (P = 0.03) and 34% reduction in mortality or hospitalization (P = 0.004) vs. placebo. In contrast, Gly-389 carriers had no clinical response to bucindolol compared with placebo. Those with Arg-389 and high baseline norepinephrine levels trended toward improved survival, but no advantage with this allele and exaggerated sympatholysis was identified. We conclude that beta(1)AR-389 variation alters signaling in multiple models and affects the beta-blocker therapeutic response in HF and, thus, might be used to individualize treatment of the syndrome.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2006 · Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

Publication Stats

3k Citations
439.68 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006-2013
    • George Washington University
      • Biostatistics Center
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States
    • United States Department of Veterans Affairs
      Бедфорд, Massachusetts, United States
  • 2002-2005
    • National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
      베서스다, Maryland, United States
  • 2003
    • University of Utah
      Salt Lake City, Utah, United States
    • Louisiana State University in Shreveport
      Shreveport, Louisiana, United States