Frans Nollet

University of Amsterdam, Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (154)493.44 Total impact

  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Background Many persons affected with poliomyelitis develop post-polio syndrome (PPS) later in their life. Recently, the effectiveness of Exercise Therapy (ET) and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for PPS has been evaluated in a randomized controlled trial, but did not show a decrease in fatigue or improvement in secondary endpoints like Quality of Life and self-perceived activity limitations. The aim of this explorative study was to gain insight in the perceived effects and experiences of the interventions from the perspectives of the patients and therapists. Methods Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 17 patients and 7 therapists. All participants were involved in the trial. A thematic analysis of the data was performed. Results Some patients experienced a short term enhanced endurance and a better use of energy during the day. However, in general patients did not experience a long lasting reduction of fatigue from the CBT or ET. Mainly patients of the CBT, but also some patients of the ET described an increase of self-esteem and self-acceptance. As a result, patients were sometimes better able to perform physical activities during the day. In contrast to the CBT, the ET was in general perceived by the patients as an intensive therapy, which was difficult to fit into their daily routine. Therapists of both the CBT and the ET struggled with a low intrinsic motivation of the patients in the study. This made it sometimes difficult for the therapists to follow the protocol. Conclusion Confirming the negative quantitative study outcome, the qualitative results did not demonstrate lasting effects on fatigue. Patients did, however, experience some benefits on self-esteem and acceptance of the disease. This study showed that it is of great importance to work with feasible interventions; they should fit the patients’ needs on a practical (fit into their daily routine) and mental (fit their need for support) level.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2016 · BMC Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: We aimed to examine health-related physical fitness and its demographic and clinical correlates in patients recently treated with autologous stem cell transplantation.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2016
  • A. Bickerstaffe · A. Beelen · R. Lutter · F. Nollet
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    ABSTRACT: A key feature of post-polio syndrome (PPS) is progressive loss of muscle strength. In other chronic diseases systemic inflammation has been linked to muscle wasting. In this study plasma TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, and leptin levels were significantly increased in PPS-patients compared to healthy controls. There was however no association between these raised systemic levels of inflammatory mediators and long-term decline in quadriceps strength or other clinical parameters. In conclusion, there is evidence for systemic inflammation in PPS, yet the relationship with clinical deterioration remains tenuous.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Many risk factors exist for diabetic foot ulceration, but an integrated prospective analysis of biomechanical, behavioural, and disease parameters is non-existent in patients with neuropathy and prior ulceration.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Custom-made therapeutic footwear is a common treatment used to prevent ulcer recurrence in diabetic patients with neuropathy.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of custom-made footwear, of which offloading is improved based on in-shoe plantar pressure analysis, in preventing plantar foot ulcer recurrence in high-risk diabetic patients.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: To investigate whether an implantable functional electrical stimulation (FES) system of the common peroneal nerve (ActiGait®) improves relevant aspects of gait in chronic stroke patients with a drop foot typically using an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO). Methods: Ten community-dwelling patients participated, of whom eight patients could be analysed. Gait quality (kinematic, kinetic, and spatiotemporal characteristics) during a 10-meter comfortable walk test, normalised net energy expenditure during a 6-minute walk test, participation (physical activity and stroke impact) and user satisfaction were tested before implantation and at various moments after FES-system activation up to 26 weeks. Results: Walking with FES yielded increased maximum paretic ankle plantarflexion (FES: -0.12; AFO: -4.79°, p < 0.01), higher paretic peak ankle power (FES: 1.46; AFO: 0.98 W/kg, p < 0.05) and better step length symmetry (FES: 14.90; AFO: 21.45% , p < 0.05). User satisfaction was higher for FES, but was unrelated to objective gait improvements. Energy expenditure and participation did not change. Conclusion: Implantable FES improved the use of residual ankle plantarflexion motion, ankle power of the paretic leg and step length symmetry compared to using an AFO, however, not resulting in decreased energy expenditure or improved participation. User satisfaction was highest with FES, but this was not related to the observed gait improvements.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Objective To examine the longitudinal associations between caregiver strain and patients’ clinical and psychosocial characteristics as well as caregivers’ psychosocial characteristics. Methods At 4-month intervals during the 12 months study period, longitudinal data on caregiver strain and patient and caregiver factors potentially associated with caregiver strain were collected from 126 couples, who participated in a randomised controlled trial on the effectiveness of case management in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Caregiver strain was assessed with the Caregiver Strain Index (CSI). Patient and caregiver factors included sociodemographic characteristics, distress, coping style and perceived quality of care, as well as the patient's functional status and emotional functioning. Multilevel regression analyses were performed. Results Caregiver strain increased significantly during the study period (β=0.315 points/months, p<0.001) and was significantly associated with patient time-dependent factors functional status (β=−0.131 points/months, p<0.001) and emotional functioning (β=0.022 points/months, p=0.03), and caregiver time-dependent factors passive coping style (β=0.152 points/months, p=0.03), symptoms of anxiety (β=0.186 points/months, p<0.001) and perceived quality of care for the caregiver (β=−0.452 points/months, p<0.001). Conclusions Our study has identified that apart from the patient's physical disability and emotional well-being, a passive coping style of the caregiver, increased symptoms of anxiety and feeling less supported by the ALS-team impact on caregiver strain. The multidisciplinary teams involved with the care of patients with ALS need to be aware of these factors and increase their attention for the caregiver. This will help guide the development of evidence-based supportive interventions that focus on caregiver's coping style and avoiding distress. Trial registration number Netherlands Trial Register, number NTR1270.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of neurology, neurosurgery, and psychiatry
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    ABSTRACT: People with postpolio syndrome (PPS) commonly experience severe fatigue that persists over time and negatively affects functioning and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). To study the efficacy of exercise therapy (ET) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) on reducing fatigue and improving activities and HRQoL in patients with PPS. We conducted a multicenter, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial. Over 4 months, severely fatigued patients with PPS received ET, CBT, or usual care (UC). The primary end point (fatigue) was assessed using the subscale fatigue severity of the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS20-F). Secondary end points included activities and HRQoL, which were assessed with the Sickness Impact Profile and the 36-Item Short-Form, respectively. End points were measured at baseline and at 4, 7, and 10 months. A total of 68 patients were randomized. No differences were observed between the intervention groups and UC group for fatigue (mean differences in CIS20-F score = 1.47, 95%CI = -2.84 to 5.79, for ET versus UC; and 1.87, 95%CI = -2.24 to 5.98, for CBT versus UC), activities, or HRQoL. Our results demonstrate that neither ET nor CBT were superior to UC in reducing fatigue in severely fatigued PPS patients. Further research should investigate explanations for the lack of efficacy of these 2 currently advised approaches in clinical practice, which may provide clues to improving treatment aimed at reducing fatigue in PPS. © The Author(s) 2015.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Neurorehabilitation and neural repair
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    ABSTRACT: To compare attention skills of children with a very low birth weight (VLBW) with children with a normal birth weight (NBW) when entering primary school, and explore the association of attention skills with school career 2 years later. Participants were 151 children with VLBW and 41 with NBW. Attention was assessed at 3 years and 8 months of corrected age (CA) and school career at 5½ years of CA. Children performed two tests, parents completed three questionnaires, and an assessor systematically observed children's attention. Children with VLBW had significantly lower mean scores on five of the six measures. Significantly more children with VLBW had scores in the clinical range on the Child Behavior Checklist completed by the parents (13% versus 0%) and scores representing dysfunction on assessor observations (19% versus 2%). At 5½ years of age, 36% of the children with VLBW followed special education or had grade retention. Dysfunctional attention as observed by the assessor was most strongly associated with need for learning support at 5½ years of age. At preschool age, children with VLBW have attention difficulties. Attentive behavior at preschool age is a predictor of school career 2 years later.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Physical & Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics
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    ABSTRACT: Intensive Care Unit - acquired weakness (ICU-AW) is thought to mediate physical impairments in survivors of critical illness but few studies have investigated this thoroughly. The purpose was to investigate differences in post-ICU mortality and physical functioning between patients with and without ICU-AW at 6 months after ICU discharge. ICU patients, mechanically ventilated ≥2 days, were included in a single center prospective observational cohort study. ICU-AW was diagnosed when the average Medical Research Council (MRC) score was <4 in awake and attentive patients. Post-ICU mortality was recorded until 6 months after ICU discharge; in surviving patients physical functioning was assessed using the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) physical functioning (PF) domain. The independent effect of ICU-AW on post-ICU mortality was analyzed using a multivariable Cox proportional hazards model. The independent effect of ICU-AW on the PF domain score was analyzed using a multivariable linear regression model. 156 patients were included, of whom 80 with ICU-AW. Twenty-three patients died in the ICU (20 with ICU-AW); during the 6 months follow-up after ICU discharge another 25 patients died (17 with ICU-AW). PF scores were available for 96 survivors (39 patients with ICU-AW). ICU-AW was independently associated with an increase in post-ICU mortality (HR 3.6 (95% CI: 1.3 to 9.8); p:0.01) and with a decrease in physical functioning (β: -16.7 points (95% CI: -30.2 to -3.1); p:0.02). ICU-AW is independently associated with higher post-ICU mortality and with clinically relevant lower physical functioning in survivors at 6 months after ICU discharge.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Critical care (London, England)
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    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Critical Care
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    ABSTRACT: Custom-made footwear is used to offload the diabetic foot to prevent plantar foot ulcers. This prospective study evaluates the offloading effects of modifying custom-made footwear and aims to provide data-driven directions for the provision of effectively offloading footwear in clinical practice. Eighty-five people with diabetic neuropathy and a recently healed plantar foot ulcer, who participated in a clinical trial on footwear effectiveness, had their custom-made footwear evaluated with in-shoe plantar pressure measurements at three-monthly intervals. Footwear was modified when peak pressure was ≥ 200 kPa. The effect of single and combined footwear modifications on in-shoe peak pressure at these high-pressure target locations was assessed. All footwear modifications significantly reduced peak pressure at the target locations compared with pre-modification levels (range -6.7% to -24.0%, P < 0.001). The metatarsal heads were most frequently targeted. Repositioning an existing (trans-)metatarsal pad in the shoe insole (-15.9% peak pressure relief), applying local cushioning to the insole (-15.0%) and replacing the insole top cover with Plastazote (-14.2%) were the most effective single modifications. Combining a new Plastazote top cover with a trans-metatarsal bar (-24.0% peak pressure relief) or with local cushioning (-22.0%) were the most effective combined modifications. In people with diabetic neuropathy and a recently healed plantar foot ulcer, significant offloading can be achieved at high-risk foot regions by modifying custom-made footwear. These results provide data-driven directions for the design and evaluation of custom-made footwear for high-risk people with diabetes, and essentially mean that each shoe prescribed should incorporate those design features that effectively offload the foot. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Diabetic Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: To develop evidence-based recommendations for effective and safe diagnostic assessment and intervention strategies for the physiotherapy treatment of patients in intensive care units. We used the EBRO method, as recommended by the 'Dutch Evidence Based Guideline Development Platform' to develop an 'evidence statement for physiotherapy in the intensive care unit'. This method consists of the identification of clinically relevant questions, followed by a systematic literature search, and summary of the evidence with final recommendations being moderated by feedback from experts. Three relevant clinical domains were identified by experts: criteria to initiate treatment; measures to assess patients; evidence for effectiveness of treatments. In a systematic literature search, 129 relevant studies were identified and assessed for methodological quality and classified according to the level of evidence. The final evidence statement consisted of recommendations on eight absolute and four relative contra-indications to mobilization; a core set of nine specific instruments to assess impairments and activity restrictions; and six passive and four active effective interventions, with advice on (a) physiological measures to observe during treatment (with stopping criteria) and (b) what to record after the treatment. These recommendations form a protocol for treating people in an intensive care unit, based on best available evidence in mid-2014. © The Author(s) 2015.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Clinical Rehabilitation
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    ABSTRACT: Elevated dynamic plantar foot pressures significantly increase the risk of foot ulceration in diabetes mellitus. The aim was to determine which factors predict plantar pressures in a population of diabetic patients who are at high-risk of foot ulceration. Patients with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy and a history of ulceration were eligible for inclusion in this cross sectional study. Demographic data, foot structure and function, and disease-related factors were recorded and used as potential predictor variables in the analyses. Barefoot peak pressures during walking were calculated for the heel, midfoot, forefoot, lesser toes, and hallux regions. Potential predictors were investigated using multivariate linear regression analyses. 167 participants with mean age of 63 years contributed 329 feet to the analyses. The regression models were able to predict between 6% (heel) and 41% (midfoot) of the variation in peak plantar pressures. The largest contributing factor in the heel model was glycosylated haemoglobin concentration, in the midfoot Charcot deformity, in the forefoot prominent metatarsal heads, in the lesser toes hammer toe deformity and in the hallux previous ulceration. Variables with local effects (e.g. foot deformity) were stronger predictors of plantar pressure than global features (e.g. body mass, age, gender, or diabetes duration). The presence of local deformity was the largest contributing factor to barefoot dynamic plantar pressure in high-risk diabetic patients and should therefore be adequately managed to reduce plantar pressure and ulcer risk. However, a significant amount of variance is unexplained by the models, which advocates the quantitative measurement of plantar pressures in the clinical risk assessment of the patient.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Our objective was to explore the needs and value of case management according to patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), their spousal caregivers, and health care professionals in the context of multidisciplinary ALS care. We undertook semi-structured interviews with 10 patients with ALS, their caregivers (n = 10) and their ALS health care professionals (n = 10), and held a focus group (n = 20). We transcribed the audio-taped interviews and analysed all data thematically. Participants indicated that in certain circumstances case management can have an added value. They identified factors for receptiveness to case management: adequacy of usual care, rate of disease progression, and degree of social network support and personal factors of patients and spousal caregivers. Participants valued the time for consultation, house calls and proactive approach of the case manager. Patients with ALS and caregivers appreciated emotional support, whereas professionals did not mention the importance of emotional support by the case manager. In conclusion, ALS teams can consider implementation of valued aspects of case management (accessibility, ample time, proactive approach, emotional support) in the usual multidisciplinary ALS care. Additional support might be provided to patients with rapidly progressive disease course, passive coping style and small social network.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Frontotemporal Degeneration
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Generalized Joint Hypermobility (GJH) is regarded as the main diagnostic criterion for Hypermobility Syndrome and is assumed to be of importance for the development of musculoskeletal complaints and functional decline. However GJH is also highly prevalent amongst healthy individuals whereas its consequences for physical functioning are unclear. Therefore the objective of the study was to determine the association of GJH with physical functioning in healthy adolescents and young adults. Methods: 328 participants (mean age (sd): 20.2 (1.8), gender (male/female): 134/194) were included. In order to establish the effect of GJH, subjects with symptomatic forms of GJH were excluded, as were subjects with other conditions that could influence physical functioning. Age, gender, BMI, GJH, muscle strength and physical activity level (PAL) in METS were collected. Results: GJH was associated with reduced muscle strength for all muscle groups (p=<.05), controlled for age and BMI. Ranging from -0.7 to -1.0SD in females and -.3 to -1.3SD in males. GJH was found to be significantly associated with higher amounts of METS spent on cycling, ranging from +0.2 to +0.9SD in females (p=.002) and +0.3 to +0.9SD in males (p=.041), where lower amounts of METS spent on sports activities was observed, ranging from -0.4 to -1.2SD in females (p=.002) and -0.2 to -1.9SD in males (p=.004). Conclusion: Individuals with GJH have reduced muscle strength and tend to avoid dynamic activities and prefer more stable activities, like cycling. This may indicate that individuals with GJH adapt their behaviour to prevent musculoskeletal complaints and functional decline.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · Current Rheumatology Reviews
  • A. Bickerstaffe · A. Beelen · F. Nollet
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    ABSTRACT: Post-polio syndrome is characterised by progressive muscle weakness and other symptoms which can limit physical mobility. We assessed the rate of decline in mobility over 10 years in relation to strength decline; and investigated potential predictors for the rate of decline of walking capacity, a measure of mobility, in 48 patients with post-polio syndrome and proven quadriceps dysfunction at baseline. Average walking capacity and self-reported physical mobility declined over 10 years, by 6 and 14%, respectively. Concomitantly people lost an average of 15% of isometric quadriceps strength. Significantly more people used walking aids offering greater support at follow-up. Notably, there was much individual variation, with 18% of participants losing a substantial amount of walking capacity (27% decline) and concomitant self-reported physical mobility (38% decline). Loss of quadriceps strength only explained a small proportion of the variance of the decline in walking capacity (R=11%) and the rate of decline could not be predicted from baseline values for strength, walking capacity, self-reported physical mobility or basic demographics. The individual variability, yet lack of predictive factors, underscores the need for personally tailored care based on actual functional decline in patients with post-polio syndrome.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Neuromuscular Disorders
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    ABSTRACT: The progressive course of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) results in an ever-changing spectrum of the care needs of patients with ALS. Knowledge of prognostic factors for the functional course of ALS may enhance clinical prediction and improve the timing of appropriate interventions. Our objective was to systematically review the evidence regarding prognostic factors for the rate of functional decline of patients with ALS, assessed with versions of the ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS). Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality of the thirteen included studies using the Quality in Prognosis Studies (QUIPS) tool. The overall quality of evidence for each prognostic factor was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach, considering risk of bias, imprecision, inconsistency, indirectness, and publication bias. The quality of evidence for the prognostic value of age at onset, site of onset, time from symptom onset to diagnosis, and ALSFRS-Revised baseline score was low, mainly due to the limited data and inconsistency of results in the small number of studies included. The prognostic value of initial rate of disease progression, age at diagnosis, forced vital capacity, frontotemporal dementia, body mass index, and comorbidity remains unclear. We conclude that the current evidence on prognostic factors for functional decline in ALS is insufficient to allow the development of a prediction tool that can support clinical decisions. Given the limited data, future prognostic studies may need to focus on factors that have a predictive value for a decline in ALSFRS(-R) domain scores, preferably based on internationally collected and shared data.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2014 · Journal of Neurology
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Post-ICU clinics have been advocated to reduce long-term physical and psychological impairments among ICU survivors. A format for optimal structure, timing, and care content has not yet been established. We developed and implemented two post-ICU clinics in different hospital settings and evaluated the feasibility. Methods: In this prospective cohort study ICU-survivors of a university hospital (AMC) and a general hospital (TG), who were mechanically ventilated ≥2 days and discharged to their homes, were invited to the post-ICU clinic one month after hospital discharge (AMC) or three months after ICU discharge (TG). Feasibility was evaluated as 1) the number of eligible ICU-survivors and the proportion that attended; 2) the prevalence of ICU-related abnormalities, that required referral for further treatment; and 3) patient satisfaction. Results: Forty-five of 629 AMC-patients and 70 of 142 TG-patients were eligible for the post-ICU clinic. Of these, 49% and 67% respectively, visited the outpatient clinic (P=0.026). The majority of all screened patients had functional restrictions, and 68% required referral for further diagnosis and treatment. Patient satisfaction was high. Conclusion: This study provides valuable information to support the implementation of post-ICU clinics. The use of validated screening instruments facilitates the identification of patients with need for further treatment. Early in-hospital screening and recruiting patients at highest risk for adverse outcome could be a more targeted approach to achieve greater benefit.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Minerva anestesiologica

Publication Stats

2k Citations
493.44 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999-2015
    • University of Amsterdam
      • • Faculty of Medicine AMC
      • • Department of Neurology
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2014
    • University of Groningen
      Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands
    • Academic Medical Center (AMC)
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2004-2014
    • Academisch Medisch Centrum Universiteit van Amsterdam
      • • Academic Medical Center
      • • Department of Rehabilitation Medicine
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2010
    • Roessingh Research and Development
      Enschede, Overijssel, Netherlands
  • 1996-2010
    • VU University Amsterdam
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2009
    • Medisch Centrum Haaglanden
      's-Gravenhage, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2003-2007
    • VU University Medical Center
      • Rehabilitation Medicine Clinic
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands