Eppo B Wolvius

VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (85)172.08 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of this study was to examine the association between the bone mass (bone mineral content [BMC]) and hypomineralized second primary molars (HSPMs)/molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) in 6-y-old children. This cross-sectional study was embedded in the Generation R Study, a population-based prospective cohort study, starting from fetal life until adulthood in Rotterdam, Netherlands. The European Academy of Pediatric Dentistry criteria were used to score the intraoral photographs on the presence or absence of HSPMs and MIH. Bone mass was measured with a dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scan. Intraoral photographs and DXA scans were available in 6,510 6-y-old children. Binary logistic regression models were used to study the association between the bone mass and HSPMs/MIH. In total, 5,586 children had their second primary molars assessed and a DXA scan made; 507 children were diagnosed with HSPM. Of 2,370 children with data on their permanent first molars, 203 were diagnosed with MIH. In the fully adjusted model, children with lower BMC (corrected for bone area) were more likely to have HSPMs (odds ratio, 1.13; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.26 per 1-standard deviation decrease). A lower BMC (corrected for bone area) was not associated with MIH (odds ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.87 to 1.20 per 1-standard deviation decrease). We observed a negative association between BMC (corrected for bone area) and HSPMs. No association was found between BMC (corrected for bone area) and MIH. Future research should focus on investigating the mechanism underlying the negative association between the bone mass and HSPMs. Our study, in a large population of 6-y-old children, adds the finding that BMC (corrected for bone size) is associated with HSPMs but not with MIH in childhood.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Dental Research
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    Full-text · Dataset · Dec 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Background: No reviews or guidelines are available on evidence-based treatment for the multidisciplinary approach in Treacher Collins syndrome. The authors' aim is to provide an evidence-based review of multidisciplinary treatment of Treacher Collins syndrome based on levels of evidence and supported with graded recommendations. Methods: A systematic search was performed by means of the PubMed, Web-of-Science, Embase, and Cochrane Central databases (1985 to January of 2014). Included were clinical studies (with five or more Treacher Collins syndrome patients) related to therapy, diagnosis, or risk of concomitant diseases. Level of evidence of the selected articles was rated according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. After two panelists had reviewed each abstract separately, a consensus method was used to solve any disagreements concerning article inclusion. Results: Of the 2433 identified articles, 63 studies (Level of Evidence II through V) were included. Conclusions and recommendations were extracted consecutively for the following items: upper airway; ear, hearing, and speech; the eye, eyelashes, and lacrimal system; growth, feeding, and swallowing; the nose; psychosocial factors; and craniofacial reconstruction. Conclusions: In this systematic review, current evidence for the multidisciplinary treatment of Treacher Collins syndrome is provided, recommendations for treatment are made, and a proposed algorithm for treatment is presented. Although some topics are well supported, others, especially ocular, nasal, speech, feeding, and swallowing problems, lack sufficient evidence. In addition, craniofacial surgical reconstruction lacks a sufficient level of evidence to provide a sound basis for a full treatment protocol. Despite the rarity of the syndrome, more research is needed to compare outcomes of several surgical treatments, especially in orbitozygomatic/maxillary regions.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
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    Lea Kragt · Brunilda Dhamo · Eppo B. Wolvius · Edwin M. Ongkosuwito
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction A limited amount of systematic literature reviews on the association between malocclusions and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQOL) summarize inconclusive results. Therefore, we conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis on the association of malocclusions with OHRQOL in children. Methods Relevant studies were identified in Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane, Google Scholar and other databases. All studies with data on malocclusions or orthodontic treatment need and OHRQOL in children were included. Methodological quality of the studies was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Random effects models were used to estimate summary effect measures for the association between malocclusion and OHRQOL in a continuous and a categorical data analysis. Tests for heterogeneity, publication bias and sensitivity of results were performed. Results In total, 40 cross-sectional studies were included in the meta-analyses. Summary measures of the continuous data show that OHRQOL was significantly lowered in children with malocclusions (standardized mean difference (95 % CI] = 0.29 (0.19–0.38)). The summary odds ratio for having an impact on OHRQOL was 1.74 times higher in children with malocclusion than in children without malocclusions. Heterogeneity among studies was partly explained by malocclusion assessment, age of the children and country of study conduction. Conclusion Our results provide evidence for a clear inverse association of malocclusion with OHRQOL. We also showed that the strength of the association differed depending on the age of the children and their cultural environment. Clinical relevance Dentists benefit from understanding the patient differences regarding the impact of malocclusions.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Clinical Oral Investigations
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper we present a novel approach to automatic 3D facial landmarking using 2D Gabor wavelets. Our algorithm considers the face to be a surface and uses map projections to derive 2D features from raw data. Extracted features include texture, relief map and transformations thereof. We extend an established 2D landmarking method for simultaneous evaluation of these data. The method is validated by performing landmarking experiments on two data sets using 21 landmarks and compared to an active shape model implementation. On average, landmarking error for our method was 1.9mm whereas the active shape model resulted in an average landmarking error of 2.3mm. A second study investigating facial shape heritability in related individuals concludes that automatic landmarking is on par with manual landmarking for some landmarks. Our algorithm can be trained in 30 minutes to automatically landmark 3D facial data sets of any size, and allows for fast and robust landmarking of 3D faces.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · IEEE Transactions on Image Processing
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    ABSTRACT: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is highly prevalent in children with Apert and Crouzon syndromes. Although often related to midface hypoplasia, it is a multi-level problem for which routine midface advancement might be a suboptimal treatment choice. We therefore wished to: 1.) use upper airway endoscopy to examine the level of obstruction in children with OSA; 2.) determine the relationship between endoscopic assessment and OSA severity; and 3.) evaluate the effect of surgery on endoscopic assessment and OSA severity.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Journal of Cranio-Maxillofacial Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Background Dentofacial injuries are a risk while playing field hockey. Wearing mouthguards is recommended. Objective To synthesise findings on the prevalence and characteristics of dentofacial injuries sustained by field hockey players. We also investigated the prevalence of regular mouthguard use and players’ attitude towards use of mouthguard. Material and methods A literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, OvidSP, Web of Science, Cochrane and Cinahl databases. Eligible studies were identified based on the title, abstract and full text of articles. If applicable, a random effects model was used to calculate the overall effect size; otherwise, pooled prevalence was reported. Results 11 studies were eligible for the analysis. The average proportion of field hockey players who had sustained at least one dentofacial injury varied from 12.7% (95% CI 8.5% to 17.0%) among junior and senior players to 45.2% (95% CI 39.3% to 51.0%) among elite players. We did not observe any significant differences with respect to gender. In the 2000s, a significantly higher proportion of players regularly wore a mouthguard, 84.5% (95% CI 69.3% to 99.7%) as compared with players 20 years ago, 31.4% (95% CI 22.7% to 40.1%). The most common complaints about the mouthguard were that it was unnecessary and uncomfortable. Conclusion Dentofacial injuries pose a serious problem in field hockey and a substantial number of players do not regularly wear a mouthguard. Greater use of mouthguards would be expected to reduce dentofacial injuries in field hockey.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · British Journal of Sports Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to investigate the pattern of hypodontia in the Dutch population and determine the association between hypodontia and dental development in children with and without hypodontia, applying three different standards, Dutch, French Canadian, and Belgian, to estimate dental age. Methods We used dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) of 1488 children (773 boys and 715 girls), with a mean age of 9.76 years (SD = 0.24) participating in a population-based cohort study in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, born in 2002–2004, and 452 children (219 boys and 233 girls) with a mean age of 9.83 years (SD = 1.09) participating in a mixed-longitudinal, interdisciplinary population-based cohort study in Nijmegen, the Netherlands born in 1960–1968. Results The prevalence of hypodontia in the Generation R Study was 5.6 % (N = 84) and 5.1 % (N = 23) in the Nijmegen Growth Study. Linear regression analysis showed that children with hypodontia had a 0.37 [95 % CI (−0.53,-0.21)] to 0.52 [95 % CI (−0.76,-0.38)] years lower dental age than children without hypodontia. The ordinal regression analysis showed a delay in development of mandibular second premolars [1.68 years; 95 %CI (−1.90,-1.46)], mandibular first premolars [0.57 years; 95 % CI (−0.94,-0.20)], and mandibular second molars [0.47 years; 95 % CI (−0.84,-0.11)]. Conclusion These findings suggest that children with hypodontia have a delayed dental development. Clinical relevance The delay of dental development in children with hypodontia should be taken into consideration and therefore orthodontists should recognize that a later start of treatment in these patients may be necessary.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2015 · Clinical Oral Investigations
  • E.B. Wolvius · M. Koudstaal

    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Oral health-related quality of life (OHRQOL) is currently assessed by long questionnaires, which limits its applicability as an outcome measure in orthodontic practice and research. The aim of the study was to evaluate a shortened measure with a low response burden for assessing OHRQOL in children. A cross-sectional study of 243 prospective orthodontically treated children (12 percent cleft lip, 68 percent with definite objective treatment need, 20 percent borderline objective treatment need) collected data on OHRQOL using the 38-item version of the Child Oral Health Impact Profile (COHIP-38) and general health perception (GHP), and subjectively and objectively measured orthodontic treatment need. Eleven items of the COHIP-38 were selected for the short version of the questionnaire (COHIP-ortho). Score distributions, internal consistency, construct and criterion validity, as well as subgroup analysis were used to evaluate the psychometric properties of both questionnaires. The performances of COHIP-ortho and COHIP-38 were compared. The internal consistency was somewhat lower for the COHIP-ortho compared with the COHIP-38, but on an acceptable level for both questionnaires. The correlations between COHIP-ortho scores and COHIP-38 overall as well as subscale scores were excellent. COHIP-ortho performed adequately regarding construct and criterion validity related to most sample characteristics compared with the performance of the COHIP-38. The COHIP-ortho is as valid as the COHIP-38 for assessing OHRQOL in children. With a low response burden for patients or study participants, reduced cost, and less time needed for administration, the COHIP-ortho simplifies the investigation of OHRQOL in orthodontics. © 2015 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Public Health Dentistry
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    ABSTRACT: To provide an overview of current practice patterns with regard to Robin sequence (RS) patients in Europe, a survey was conducted among European clinicians. This online survey consisted of different sections assessing characteristics of the respondent and clinic, definition, diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up. In total, surveys from 101 different European clinics were included in the analysis, and 56 different RS definitions were returned. The majority (72%) of the respondents used a sleep study system to determine the severity of the airway obstruction. A total of 63% used flexible endoscopy and 16% used rigid endoscopy in the diagnostic process. Treatment of the airway obstruction differed considerably between the different countries. Prone positioning for mild airway obstruction was the treatment modality used most often (63%). When prone positioning was not successful, a nasopharyngeal airway was used (62%). Surgical therapies varied considerably among countries. For severe obstruction, mandibular distraction was performed most frequently. Three-quarters of the respondents noted the presence of catch-up growth in their patient population. This first European survey study on definition and management of RS shows that there are considerable differences within Europe. Therefore, we would encourage the establishment of national (and international) guidelines to optimize RS patient care. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of cranio-maxillo-facial surgery: official publication of the European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of this study is to assess prevalence, severity, and duration of respiratory distress following palatoplasty in children with Robin sequence and to evaluate perioperative management. Design: Retrospective chart review study. Data were collected for patients who were born between 2009 and 2012 and underwent palatoplasty in the Sophia Children's Hospital-Erasmus Medical Center. Results: Of the 75 patients with cleft palate, 30 with Robin sequence and a control group of 45 cleft without Robin sequence underwent palatoplasty. Prior to closure, 26 of 30 patients with Robin sequence had been treated by prone positioning, and four needed additional treatment. The mean age at closure was 12.4 months for patients with Robin sequence and 10.9 months for patients without Robin sequence (P = .05). On the basis of the results of preoperative polysomnography with palatal plate, closure was postponed in two patients with Robin sequence. In the Robin sequence group, eight of the 30 patients developed postoperative respiratory distress within 48 hours and one patient, after 7 days; whereas none within the non-Robin sequence group developed respiratory distress. In all nine cases of Robin sequence the obstructive problems resolved within a few days, with four children requiring a temporary nasopharyngeal tube. There were no significant differences between preoperative polysomnography results of the nine patients with Robin sequence who developed postoperative respiratory distress compared with those patients with Robin sequence who did not. Conclusion: Despite delayed closure compared with children without Robin sequence, 30% of the children with Robin sequence developed respiratory distress following palatoplasty, which resolved within a few days. This study emphasizes the need for close perioperative monitoring of patients with Robin sequence who undergo palatoplasty.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal
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    ABSTRACT: To examine the relationship between head growth, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and intracranial hypertension in patients with syndromic or complex craniosynostosis, and to evaluate our standardized treatment protocol for the management of intracranial hypertension in these patients. Prospective observational cohort study of patients with syndromic craniosynostosis at a national referral center, treated according to a standardized protocol. occipital-frontal head circumference (OFC), with growth arrest defined as downward deflection in OFC trajectory ≥0.5 SD fall from baseline over 2 years, or lack of change in OFC growth curve; sleep studies, with results dichotomized into no/mild versus moderate/severe OSA; fundoscopy to indicate papilledema, supplemented by optical coherence tomography and/or intracranial pressure monitoring to identify intracranial hypertension. We included 62 patients, of whom 21 (33.9%) had intracranial hypertension, 39 (62.9%) OSA, and 20 (32.3%) OFC growth arrest during the study. Age at which intracranial hypertension first occurred was 2.0 years (range: 0.4-6.0). Pre-operatively 13 (21.0%) patients had intracranial hypertension, which was only associated with moderate/severe OSA (P=0.012). In the first year after surgery, intracranial hypertension was particularly related to OFC growth arrest (P=0.006). Beyond a year after surgery, intracranial hypertension was associated with a combination of OFC growth arrest (P<0.001) and moderate/severe OSA (P=0.007). Children with syndromic craniosynostosis are at risk of intracranial hypertension. The major determinant of this after vault expansion is impaired head growth, which may occur at varying age. Presence of moderate/severe OSA also significantly increases the risk of intracranial hypertension.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Patients with craniofacial microsomia are at higher risk of developing obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), as described in the previous article entitled "Obstructive sleep apnoea in craniofacial microsomia: a systematic review". These patients are also more likely to develop feeding difficulties. The present systematic review provides an overview of the literature on the prevalence, treatment, and follow-up of feeding difficulties in children with craniofacial microsomia (CFM). A search was performed in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science for articles on CFM and feeding difficulties. The following data were extracted from the articles: number of patients, patient characteristics, presence of feeding difficulties, and the treatment and outcomes of feeding difficulties. Eight articles on CFM and feeding difficulties were included, two of which reported the prevalence of feeding difficulties (range 42-83%). Treatment mostly consisted of tube feeding. No information regarding follow-up was found in these articles. According to the literature, feeding difficulties are related to CFM. However, as there have been no prospective studies and few studies have presented objective measurements, no definitive conclusions can be drawn. Prospective studies are needed to determine the prevalence of feeding difficulties in patients with CFM. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Children with craniofacial microsomia (CFM) are at risk of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). This systematic review provides an overview of the literature on the prevalence of OSA in children with CFM. A search was performed in PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science for articles on CFM and OSA. The following data were extracted from the articles: number of patients, patient characteristics, presence of OSA, polysomnography outcomes, and the treatments and outcomes of OSA. We included 16 articles on CFM and OSA, four of which reported the prevalence of OSA (range 7-67%). Surgical treatment was more often described in these patients than conservative treatment. According to the literature, OSA is related to CFM. However, as there have been no prospective studies and few studies have presented objective measurements, no definitive conclusions can be drawn. Prospective studies are needed to determine the prevalence of OSA in patients with CFM. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015 · International Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is used in the treatment of radiation-induced tissue injury but its effect on (residual) tumor tissue is indistinct and therefore investigated in this study. Orthotopic FaDu tumors were established in mice, and the response of the (irradiated) tumors to HBOT was monitored by bioluminescence imaging. Near infrared fluorescence imaging using AngioSense750 and Hypoxisense680 was applied to detect tumor vascular permeability and hypoxia. HBOT treatment resulted in accelerated growth of non-irradiated tumors, but mouse survival was improved. Tumor vascular leakiness and hypoxia were enhanced after HBOT, whereas histological characteristics, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers, and metastatic incidence were not influenced. Squamous cell carcinoma responds to HBOT with respect to tumor growth, vascular permeability, and hypoxia, which may have implications for its use in cancer patients. The ability to longitudinally analyze tumor characteristics highlights the versatility and potential of optical imaging methods in oncological research.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Molecular imaging and biology: MIB: the official publication of the Academy of Molecular Imaging
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    ABSTRACT: Tumor-positive resection margins are a major problem in oral cancer surgery. High-wavenumber Raman spectroscopy is a reliable technique to determine the water content of tissues which may contribute to differentiate between tumor and healthy tissue. The aim of this study was to examine the use of Raman spectroscopy to differentiate tumor from surrounding healthy tissue in oral squamous cell carcinoma. From fourteen patients undergoing tongue resection for squamous cell carcinoma, the water content was determined at 170 locations on freshly excised tongue specimens using the Raman-bands of the OH-stretching vibrations (3350-3550cm-1) and of the CH-stretching vibrations (2910-2965cm-1). The results were correlated with histopathological assessment of hematoxylin and eosin stained thin tissue sections obtained from the Raman measurement locations. The water content values from squamous cell carcinoma measurements were significantly higher than from surrounding healthy tissue (p-value <0.0001). Tumor tissue could be detected with a sensitivity of 99% and a specificity of 92% using a cut-off water content value of 69%. Because the Raman measurements are fast and can be carried out on freshly excised tissue without any tissue preparation, this finding signifies an important step towards the development of an intra-operative tool for tumor resection guidance with the aim of enabling oncological radical surgery and improvement of patient outcome.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · Analytical Chemistry
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    ABSTRACT: There is little anteroposterior growth of the midface in patients with syndromic craniosynostosis who are followed up over time without intervention. A Le Fort III with distraction osteogenesis can be done to correct this. This is a controlled way in which to achieve appreciable stable advancement of the midface without the need for bone grafting, but the vector of the movement is not always predictable. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the 3-dimensional effect of Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis with an external frame. Ten patients (aged 7-19 years) who had the procedure were included in the study. The le Fort III procedure and the placement of the external frame were followed by an activation period and then a 3-month retention period. Computed tomographic (CT) images taken before and after operation were converted and loaded into 3-dimensional image rendering software and compared with the aid of a paired sample t test and a colour-coded qualitative analysis. Comparison of the CT data before and after distraction indicated that the amount of midface advancement was significant. Le Fort III distraction osteogenesis is an effective way to advance the midface. However, the movement during osteogenesis is not always exactly in the intended direction, and a secondary operation is often necessary. Three-dimensional evaluation over a longer period of time is necessary. Copyright © 2015 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · British Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The Generation R Study is a population-based prospective cohort study from fetal life until adulthood. The study is designed to identify early environmental and genetic causes and causal pathways leading to normal and abnormal growth, development and health from fetal life, childhood and young adulthood. In total, 9,778 mothers were enrolled in the study. Data collection in children and their parents include questionnaires, interviews, detailed physical and ultrasound examinations, behavioural observations, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and biological samples. Efforts have been conducted for collecting biological samples including blood, hair, faeces, nasal swabs, saliva and urine samples and generating genomics data on DNA, RNA and microbiome. In this paper, we give an update of the collection, processing and storage of these biological samples and available measures. Together with detailed phenotype measurements, these biological samples provide a unique resource for epidemiological studies focused on environmental exposures, genetic and genomic determinants and their interactions in relation to growth, health and development from fetal life onwards.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · European Journal of Epidemiology
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    ABSTRACT: The natural course of several isolated and nonisolated orbital roof fractures is reported, by showing four cases in which a "wait and see" policy was followed. All four cases showed spontaneous repositioning and stabilizing of the fracture within less than a year. This might be explained by the equilibrium between the intraorbital and intracranial pressures.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2014 · Craniomaxillofacial Trauma and Reconstruction

Publication Stats

754 Citations
172.08 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2016
    • VU University Amsterdam
      • Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA)
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2015
    • Center For Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery
      Georgia, United States
  • 2006-2015
    • Erasmus MC
      • Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2005-2015
    • Erasmus University Rotterdam
      • Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2006-2007
    • St Anna Ziekenhuis
      Гельдроп, North Brabant, Netherlands