Dennis E. McChargue

University of Nebraska at Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska, United States

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Publications (78)176.41 Total impact

  • Antover P. Tuliao · Anna E. Jaffe · Dennis E. McChargue
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Prior research has emphasized that the key mediator in the PTSD symptom - alcohol use relationship is the expectancy of alcohol's tension-reducing properties. This study extends the literature by examining various alcohol outcome expectancies. Methods: Cross-sectional data were obtained from 198 college students who reported experiencing at least one traumatic event in childhood. Participants answered surveys measuring PTSD symptoms, alcohol outcome expectancies, and three measures of alcohol consumption and related problems. Results: Participants included 131 males (mean age = 19.65 years, SD = 1.06, range = 18 to 24) and 67 females (mean age = 19.43 years, SD = 0.82, range = 18 to 23), who were predominantly European-American (82%). For males and females, results of the multivariate analyses suggested that self-perception expectancies mediated the effects of PTSD symptoms on alcohol use severity, whereas sociability expectancies mediated the effects of PTSD symptoms on monthly alcohol use. For women, risk and aggression and sexuality expectancies mediated the relationship between PTSD symptoms and alcohol use severity, while risk and aggression expectancies mediated the relationship between PTSD symptoms and alcohol use consequences. For men, sociability expectancies mediated the effects of PTSD symptoms on alcohol use severity. Across genders, tension reduction expectancies did not mediate the relationship between PTSD symptom and the three alcohol measures. Conclusion: This study was unable to find support for the self-medication hypothesis via the tension reduction outcome expectancy pathway. However, other significant findings can be interpreted in light of the self-medication hypothesis. For example, alcohol may aid in coping with social impairments related to PTSD symptoms, particularly in a college sample. This study also highlighted gender differences in the association between PTSD symptoms and alcohol consumption and related problems.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Dual Diagnosis
  • Alicia K Klanecky · Dennis E McChargue · Antover P Tuliao
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    ABSTRACT: The relationship between early sexual abuse and college problem drinking was examined using an integration of the self-medication and vulnerability-stress models. Baseline survey data from participants (N = 213; 135 men and 78 college women) completing a mandated, brief alcohol intervention were utilized. Representative of the self-medication model, posttraumatic stress (PTSD) symptoms mediated the early sexual abuse/problem drinking relationship. Two psychological vulnerability factors - emotion dysregulation and dissociative tendencies - were incorporated into self-medication findings via more advanced mediational models. Results highlighted that problem drinking increased as dissociative tendencies increased, and relations between the vulnerability factors and PTSD symptoms were in an unexpected direction.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Journal of Addictive Diseases
  • Antover P Tuliao · Bernice Vania N Landoy · Dennis E McChargue
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    ABSTRACT: The Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test's factor structure varies depending on population and culture. Because of this inconsistency, this article examined the factor structure of the test and conducted a factorial invariance test between a U.S. and a Philippines college sample. Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that a three-factor solution outperforms the one- and two-factor solution in both samples. Factorial invariance analyses further supports the confirmatory findings by showing that factor loadings were generally invariant across groups; however, item intercepts show non-invariance. Country differences between factors show that Filipino consumption factor mean scores were significantly lower than their U.S. counterparts.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Journal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
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    Bernice Vania Landoy · Antover Tuliao · Dennis E. McChargue · Alicia Klanecky
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    ABSTRACT: The Confluence Model (Malamuth et al., 1991) posits that sexual aggression stems from the confluence of two construct constellation: Hostile Masculinity (HM) and Impersonal Sex (IS). The HM construct includes negative attitudes and a general distrust of women, which fosters adversarial views about relationships and justifies the use of force in interpersonal relationships. In contrast, men that score high on the IS construct perceive sex as a game to win rather than a source of emotional closeness, and prefer serial and casual sexual relationships compared to a long-term monogamous one. The Confluence Model also suggests distal factors that impact the HM and IS constructs, such as childhood/adolescent sexual victimization and delinquency. Modifications to the model have examined variables such as the frequency of misperception of women’s sexual intent, alcohol consumption, and negative stereotypes of drinking women (e.g., Abbey et al., 2011). Despite myriad studies examining the validity of the Confluence Model in the U.S., we know less about the applicability of the model to men in other countries, particularly in Asia. To address the gap in the literature, we utilized path analyses and multiple groups analysis to evaluate the Confluence Model in a sample of U.S. (n = 412) and Filipino (n = 101) male college students. Results suggest key group differences in the pathways which necessitated different models for the U.S. and Philippines sample. Despite the model differences, the alcohol consumption and hostile masculinity pathways were preserved and similar for both samples. The centrality of the hostile masculinity and alcohol consumption pathways across samples will serve as the foundation for the subsequent presentations in this symposium.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Aug 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Prior studies have emphasized the central role of misogynistic variables and excessive alcohol consumption in sexual assault perpetration, especially in a college student population. However, in this paper, we posit that adherence to masculine ideology is a central variable that influences hostile attitudes towards women and alcohol use. Positive associations have been observed among masculinity, substance/alcohol use, sexual risk-taking behaviors and violence. Others argue that masculine ideology also consists of positive dimensions such as achievement, honor, family-centeredness and nurturance, and emotional-connectedness, which could serve as protective factors (e.g., Arciniega et al., 2008). Because masculine ideologies may not necessarily be equivalent across cultures, our study first examines similarities and differences in the factor structure of masculine ideologies between a U.S. and Philippines sample. Exploratory factor analysis of the Multicultural Masculinity Ideology Scale (MMIS) indicates a two-factor structure consisting of Hypermasculine Posturing and Achievement for the Philippines sample. Similar factors were suggested for the U.S. sample, with an addition of a third factor Sensitivity. Although positive bivariate relationships were observed among Hypermasculinity Posturing factors and measures of alcohol consumption, misogyny, and sexual aggression, correlational differences were observed between samples. Negative or no associations were also observed for the Achievement factor and other variables of interest. Mediation analyses were subsequently conducted proposing that ascribing to masculinity ideology influences negative beliefs about women and excessive alcohol consumption, which subsequently impacts perpetration of sexual aggression.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Aug 2015
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    Antover Tuliao · Bernice Vania Landoy · Dennis E. McChargue · Alicia Klanecky
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    ABSTRACT: Contemporary social psychological models have implied, but not necessarily emphasized, the role of judgment and decision making in the perpetration of sexual aggression. In criminology literature however, models such as rational choice theory (e.g., Cornish & Clarke, 2002) suggest that criminals actively decide on courses of action by weighing the costs, rewards, and success of perpetrating a crime. Using the subjective expected utility paradigm, we aim to show that subjective probabilities of risks and benefits are associated with risk of perpetrating sexual aggression using a date-rape methodology. We also hypothesize that more negative attitudes towards women are associated with higher and unrealistic probability expectation of a woman’s receptivity to sexual intercourse. In addition, given cultural differences in sexual behavior, we will also examine differences in decision making between a U.S. and Philippines sample. In discussing the main foci of the paper, we will also present a novel way to design and analyze (using Multilevel Models or Latent Growth Curve Models) a date-rape vignette study that measures dependent variables across multiple points of the date-rape scenario, beginning from consensual flirting to consummated rape. One limitation of the vignette procedure is the reliance on measuring the dependent variable at only one time point, usually at the end of the event. However, the context in which date-rape occurs is not static, and changes in the victim’s or the perpetrator’s behavior influences information processing. We argue, therefore, that methodologies need to approximate not only the person-environment interaction, but also the dynamism inherent in events leading to aggression.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Aug 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Although the relationship between alcohol consumption and sexual aggression, at least in the U.S., has been documented, the explanatory mechanisms involved are still elusive. Sexually objectifying women involves the reduction of a person’s worth to her ability to sexually gratify men, and burgeoning evidence suggest its role in the alcohol use – sexual assault relationship (Gervais et al., 2014). In this paper, we aim to examine the mediating effects of sexual objectification in the alcohol use severity – sexual aggression relationship, and to examine whether the phenomenon exists for both the U.S. and the Philippines. Group comparison suggest that the U.S. sample (n = 412, mage = 20.03, sd = 2.54) reported higher alcohol use severity, whereas the Philippines sample (n = 101, mage = 17.79, sd = 1.78) engaged in more explicit unwanted sexual advances, a subscale of sexual objectification. Results also indicate significant positive correlation among the variables in the study. For the combined sample, path analysis results suggest that sexual objectification fully mediates the relationship between alcohol use severity and sexual aggression (standardized indirect effect = 0.013, SE = .006, p = .025). Multiple group analysis was conducted to examine the path model’s fit to the Philippines and U.S. sample. Results suggest the need to account for differences in intercept, residual variance, and one path. The mediating effect of sexual objectification was maintained for the Philippines (standardized indirect effect = 0.015, SE = .007, p = .020) and U.S. samples (standardized indirect effect = 0.011, SE = .005, p = .035). The multiple groups model achieved the criteria of good model fit (χ2 = 11.446, df = 10, p = .328; CFI = .984; TLI = .981; RMSEA = .024, pclose fit = .756). Discussion will highlight the role of alcohol and sexual objectification in reducing violence against women.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Aug 2015
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    Taylor English · Antover P. Tuliao · Andrew McGrath · Dennis E. McChargue
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    ABSTRACT: College alcohol use is associated with a number of negative consequences that influence students’ ability to matriculate through college. Despite the established association between alcohol use and lack of academic engagement, less is known about bio-behavioral mechanisms (i.e., sleep) that explain alcohol’s impact on academic engagement. The current study examines sleep disturbance mechanisms that explain alcohol’s relationship with poor academic engagement and performance. Students (n=275) completed an online questionnaire consisting of several measures related to alcohol, sleep, and academic performance. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to determine mediating relationships of latent variables derived from the questionnaires. Results indicated a significant mediating effect of sleep problems between alcohol use severity and academic performance (b = 0.184, SE = .044, p = .001, β = 0.276). The model had acceptable fit with the data: χ2 (47) = 103.548, p < .001; CFI = .969; TLI = .956; SRMR = .061; RMSEA = .065, 90% confidence interval = .048 - .082, pclose fit < .075. Findings implicate the importance of alcohol-related sleep disturbance on a student’s ability to adequately engage in academic endeavors. Interventions designed to address sleep issues along with alcohol use may lead to better academic performance in students a lead to lower college dropout rates.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jun 2015
  • S. M. Edwards · A. P. Tuliao · A. McGrath · D. E. McChargue

    No preview · Conference Paper · Jun 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Methamphetamine use remains a prevalent problem in the United States and is linked to numerous deleterious outcomes, including aggressive behavior, criminal activity, and incarceration. Given these associations, a greater understanding of factors that contribute to aggression among users of methamphetamine is needed, particularly within criminal justice settings, where users of this drug are overrepresented. Methods: The present study examined the relationships between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and emotion dysregulation and in-prison physical aggression among incarcerated males who identified as methamphetamine users (N = 60). Results: Participants' average age was 34.4 years (SD = 7.9), and they were predominantly European American (n = 48, 80%), had spent an average of 6.53 years incarcerated (SD = 4.64), and perpetrated about 1.54 acts of aggression (SD = 6.74) during the past three months. Bivariate correlations found that greater PTSD symptoms (p < .001), greater impulse control difficulties (p < .001), and limited access to emotion regulation strategies (p < .05) were associated with aggression perpetrated in prison. However, results from multiple regression analyses indicated that only PTSD symptoms (p <.001) and nonacceptance of emotional responses (p < .03) were predictive of aggression. Regression analyses also suggested that impulse control difficulties (p < .001), limited access to emotion regulation strategies (p < .04), and nonacceptance of emotional responses (p < .001) interacted with PTSD symptoms to predict increased aggressive behavior. The first interaction ran counter to study hypotheses: At greater levels of PTSD symptoms, those with greater acceptance of emotional responses reported greater aggression perpetration than those with lesser acceptance of emotional responses. The other two interactions were in line with hypotheses, showing that at greater levels of PTSD symptoms, those with greater impulse control difficulties (or lesser access to emotion regulation strategies) reported more aggressive behaviors. Conclusions: Consistent with theories of aggression, study findings suggest that PTSD symptoms bolster the risk of aggression via various forms emotion dysregulation. Results shed light on potential mechanisms that promote in-prison aggression and violent recidivism among this population.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Journal of Dual Diagnosis
  • Sarah King · Dennis McChargue
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Objective: The present study tested the magnitude at which co-occurring mental health diagnoses influenced the relationship between length of stay (LOS) and treatment outcome among adolescents (N = 118) residing in an inpatient substance abuse treatment facility. Method: Data collection was conducted via record review. Intake summaries provided information about co-occurring mental illness (internalizing and externalizing) and the number of diagnoses for each adolescent. LOS was derived from the difference between admission date and discharge date. Facility staff collected follow-up information seven days and three months post discharge. Treatment outcome was defined as abstinence and engagement in recovery activities (e.g., referral follow through, employment/school status, engagement in sober support activities). Results: Hierarchical linear regression demonstrated that comorbidities differentially moderated the relationship between LOS and treatment outcome. Median split simple effects (≤1 vs. 2+ internalizing and externalizing diagnoses) showed that LOS only predicted abstinence across three months for those with ≤1 internalizing diagnoses. There was no relationship among those with 2+ internalizing diagnoses or those with any level of externalizing diagnoses. Results from recovery activity outcomes show that LOS predicted recovery activities regardless of mental health status. However, the effect of LOS on recovery was sporadic and in most cases disappeared at the three-month follow-up. Conclusions: When adolescents have comorbidities, staying longer in an inpatient substance use treatment facility differentially impacts short-term abstinence. However, the pattern of our results suggests that these adolescents attempt to engage in recovery activities independent of abstinence and may need supplemental aftercare assistance to maintain their efforts.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Journal of Addictive Diseases
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    ABSTRACT: Prior research has demonstrated the relationship between alcohol use, misogynistic variables, and sexual aggression (Abbey et al., 2001), however, very little is known about its cross-cultural generalizability. In this study, we aim to examine male’s alcohol use severity (AUDIT; Saunders et al., 1993) and attitude towards date rape violence (ATMSDV; Price et al., 1999) predicted the propensity towards sexual aggression in a alcohol-related date rape vignette. Male college students from U.S. (n=215) and Philippines (n=67) university participated in the study in exchange for course credits. Proclivity towards date rape was measured using a revised date rape vignette stimulus (Gross et al., 2001) with 18 time points that begins with flirtation which escalates towards rape. We asked the participants, if they were the male character in the story, whether they would leave the scenario at each time point. The longer they stayed in the scenario, the higher their score (range = 1 to 18). We randomly assigned participants to four vignette conditions that varied on level of intimacy (just met versus dating) and the woman’s level of intoxication (not drunk versus drunk). Using hierarchical linear regression, there was a significant main effects of country (b=-2.38, p=.05), with Filipino students staying longer in the scenario. Given that vignette condition showed no differences we collapsed data across vignettes when examining the influence of AUDIT and ATMSDV scores on vignette responses. When entering alcohol and attitude variables, country effects disappeared (b= –1.26, p=.08). Results also produced main effects of AUDIT (b=0.33, p=.01), ATMSDV (b=3.61, p<.05), and their interaction (b= –0 .14, p=.04). Further examination of the interaction effect divided date rape attitudes into low (-1 SD), moderate (mean) and high (+1 SD) and examined these categories interaction with AUDIT scores. Results showed that those with high attitudes about date rape were more likely to stay longer in the vignette regardless of AUDIT scores. However, those with low to moderate attitudes about date rape were more likely to stay longer in the vignette as their AUDIT scores increased. As such, sexual aggression in a date rape vignette appeared more related to the level of date rape attitudes and alcohol use severity than culture, level of intimacy and woman’s intoxication.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jun 2014
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    Sarah J. Gervais · David DiLillo · Dennis E. McChargue
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: This study provided a novel consideration of the relations between alcohol consumption, sexual objectification, and sexual violence, because evidence for the links between sexual objectification and alcohol consumption as well as objectification and sexual violence are almost nonexistent in the published literature. We also developed a measure of interpersonal sexual objectification perpetration (ISOS-P) because there are no existing self-report measures of this construct. We hypothesized that these variables would be associated positively and that sexual objectification (including evaluating women’s bodies and making sexual advances toward women) would mediate the relation between alcohol use and sexual violence. Method: To test these possibilities, undergraduate men completed measures assessing their alcohol use, sexual objectification, and sexual violence. Results: Positive relations emerged between alcohol consumption frequency, alcohol consumption quantity, body evaluation, sexual advances, and sexual violence. A path analysis revealed that the combined effect of body evaluation and sexual advances was a significant mediator of the alcohol quantity and sexual violence link. As well, body evaluation was a significant mediator of the alcohol quantity and sexual advances link. Conclusion: This study provides a novel contribution to the literature by developing a measure of sexual objectification perpetration and showing that this construct mediates the frequently documented association between heavy drinking and sexual violence. These findings have implications for the prevention of alcohol-related sexual assault on college campuses.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Psychology of Violence
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    Antover P. Tuliao · McChargue, Dennis E., Ph.D.
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    ABSTRACT: Background and Objectives Extant research shows a strong relationship between alcohol use problems and sexual aggression. However, less is known about the effect of intermediary factors (eg, alcohol expectations) that may increase the likelihood of and/or explain sexual aggression during alcohol-related incidents. The present study examined alcohol outcome expectancies' (OE) mediating and/or moderating influence on the relationship between problematic alcohol use severity and sexual aggression among male college students.Methods and ResultsOne hundred and forty eight (n = 148) male college students volunteered for the study. Seventy-seven males self-reported committing at least one act of sexual aggression in their lifetime. Among those who sexually aggressed, 74% also reported symptoms of problematic drinking. Results show that sexuality-related alcohol OE fully mediated the relationship between problematic alcohol use severity and sexual aggression. Results also showed that aggression-related alcohol OE moderated the relationship between problematic alcohol use severity and sexual aggression. Specifically, aggression-related alcohol OE only influenced the relationship between problematic alcohol use and sexual aggression when alcohol problems were less severe.Conclusions and Scientific SignificanceDiscussion implicates the possible role alcohol prevention may play in reducing sexual aggression on college campuses, particularly as it relates to adjusting alcohol OE among those most likely to perpetrate. (Am J Addict 2014;XX:1–8)
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · American Journal on Addictions
  • Andrew Oakland · Dennis McChargue
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The purpose of the present study was to examine the interactive effects of social anxiety and psychosocial factors (i.e., group attendance, polysubstance use) on substance use treatment for men with a primary diagnosis of alcohol use disorder. Social anxiety and alcohol use disorders often co-occur, but it is currently unclear how having high social anxiety might affect aspects of substance use treatment, such as group participation and length of stay. Methods: This study compared men with alcohol use disorder only versus those with alcohol plus other drug disorders in a residential treatment facility. Measures included demographics, self-reported social anxiety, self-reported drug history, attendance at treatment groups, and total number of days in treatment. Results: Of 128 participants, 39 (30.5%) used only alcohol, while 89 (69.5%) used alcohol and other substances. Hierarchical linear regression showed only one significant interaction with social anxiety and length of treatment: people who used alcohol only or alcohol in addition to other substances (p < .05). Simple effects analyses revealed a positive relationship between social anxiety and length of stay among men who used only alcohol, but not among men who used more than one substance. Conclusions: Currently, the distinction between those who use only alcohol and those who use other substances as well is not often examined in the literature. However, the present study shows that this assumption of homogeneity may be inaccurate, given the differential relationships that these groups may have with factors such as social anxiety.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2014 · Journal of Dual Diagnosis
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    ABSTRACT: Prior research has examined the role of alcohol in sexual assault through utilizing date rape analogue vignettes to study perpetration and victimization. There is a paucity of cross-cultural research on this topic, leaving the generalizability and universality of the findings to question. Intimate relationships, sexual norms, and transgressions from it are governed by gender roles and social and power relations which may vary across cultures. It is unclear how individuals from different cultures would respond to situations that Americans would constitute as sexual aggression. For example, Serquina-Ramiro (2005) found that sexual coercion was common among Filipino male adolescents. Furthermore, it is also unclear how the role of alcohol intoxication would influence sexual aggression cross-culturally. The purpose of the present study was to examine culture, gender, and alcohol consumption as predictors of leaving behavior in a novel sexual encounter vignette. Data were collected from a cross-cultural study of 417 undergraduates (M age= 19, 75% Female) from a large United States University (n = 232) and a large Filipino University (n = 185). The participants completed a set of surveys which assessed problematic substance use, emotional states, trauma history, sexual history, and attitudes towards sex. A vignette was created in order to assess the participant’s comfort, level of excitement, and likelihood of leaving a coercive sexual situation between a female and a drunk male. The vignette was delivered as a between group design with four possible conditions, varying whether or not the female was drunk and whether the couple knew each other well or had just met. The vignette had eighteen possible questions, beginning with consensual interaction and progressing towards sexual assault and rape. Five of the questions were identified as events which substantially increased the level of inappropriate behavior: inappropriate touch, verbal coercion, physical coercion, verbal assault, and physical sexual assault. Differences in leaving behavior were examined as a function of gender, culture, and whether or not the female was intoxicated in the vignette. Results indicated that there were cultural differences beginning at verbal coercion and continuing to physical assault, with a greater portion of the Filipino population continuing at three of the four time points (p = .003, .034, .013 respectively). Gender differences were also present regarding the decision to stay in the situation after the inappropriate touch, with males being more likely to continue than females (X2 = 7.435, p = .024); however, no significant variability was present at other key events. There were no differences in leaving behavior related to whether or not the female was intoxicated in the encounter. Implications of these findings are discussed.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Nov 2013
  • Krista B Highland · Laura C Herschl · Alicia Klanecky · Dennis E McChargue
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    ABSTRACT: Drinking to cope has been associated with negative consequences among college students. Less is known about the biopsychosocial pathways that increase the susceptibility to these drinking problems. This study aims to assess the relationship between biopsychosocial variables that have been shown to impact substance-based coping (ie, alexithymia, childhood/adolescent abuse, and genetics). Self-report and genetic [DRD2 genotype (A1- or A1+)] information were collected from 297 participants. Using structural equation models, results found that greater amounts of emotional abuse predicted alexithymia, and substance-based coping predicted drinking problems among both groups. However, among persons with the A1+ allele, greater levels of alexithymia were associated with greater levels of substance-based coping. These results indicate that the A1+ allele may link alexithymia and prior emotional abuse to a higher risk for substance-based coping and subsequent alcohol problems. (Am J Addict 2013;22:366-372).
    No preview · Article · Jul 2013 · American Journal on Addictions
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    Antover Tuliao · Anna E. Jaffe · Dennis E. McChargue
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    ABSTRACT: A myriad of studies have supported an association between traumatic events in childhood, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and increased alcohol use (Stewart, Pihl, Conrod, & Dongier, 1998). However, it is unclear how cognitions related to alcohol use and expectancy may influence these relationships. Should cognitions impact the path from early childhood trauma to alcohol use in adulthood, cognitions relating to alcohol use may be an important target for intervention. In this study, we aim to address this understudied area by examining the role of early trauma and PTSD symptoms on alcohol outcome expectancies (OEs), as well as the role of OEs on alcohol use severity. In particular, we hypothesize that general trauma in childhood, as well as physical, emotional, and sexual abuse in childhood will indirectly influence alcohol use severity through PTSD symptoms and OEs. Consistent with other studies (Stewart et al., 1998; Jones, Corbin, & Fromme, 2002), we expect more PTSD symptoms and greater OEs will relate to increased alcohol use. A total of 733 Midwestern college students (mean age = 19.59, SD = 1.19; 63% males; 87% White) who were mandated to undergo a brief alcohol intervention participated in this study. Path analysis was conducted using Mplus, with Maximum Likelihood as the estimator. Missing data was dealt with using multiple imputation with MonteCarlo integration. Results suggest good model fit (RMSEA = .05, CFI = .99, TLI = .94, SRMR = .02). A survey of individual regression paths indicate that higher Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test scores were associated with higher PTSD symptoms, and sociability, sex, and risk/aggression OEs. On the other hand, higher risk/aggression and sexuality OEs, and PTSD symptoms were associated with higher Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index scores. Individuals who reported more general early trauma, and physical and sexual abuse before the age of 18 reported higher PTSD symptoms, and higher PTSD scores predicted higher sociability, sexuality, cognitive behavioral impairment, and risk/aggression OEs scores. Presence of early traumatic events also had effects on different OEs. Constraining nonsignificant paths to zero did not significantly change model fit indices. Discussion will focus on the role of trauma in shaping alcohol-related cognitions and alcohol use consistent with the self-medication hypothesis.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Jun 2013
  • Alicia K. Klanecky · Dennis E. McChargue
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    ABSTRACT: The experience of child/adolescent sexual abuse (CASA) has been clearly linked to regulatory deficits, alcohol consumption, and an increased risk for alcohol abuse/dependence. However, it has been emphasized that not all CASA-exposed individuals share such experiences; rather, alternative factors may increase one's vulnerability to alcohol-related outcomes. This article aims to theoretically examine the potential influence of effortful control (EC), a key construct in the development of self-regulation, as a vulnerability factor to alcohol use disorders following CASA. Within the diathesis–stress model, research is reviewed which supports the relations among lower EC abilities, the experience of CASA exposure(s), and the enhanced likelihood of alcohol use disorder development. It is posited that as EC is lower, less severe CASA is needed to facilitate risk for alcohol-related psychopathology via impairment in neuroendocrine and behavioral regulation. In turn, CASA exposure may negatively impact developing EC and also increasing likelihood of alcohol use disorder development. To this end, a thorough description of EC is provided, shared pathways between EC and CASA are reviewed, and finally, these pathways are linked to alcohol use.
    No preview · Article · Feb 2013 · Addiction Research and Theory
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    ABSTRACT: Aims: To update our prior meta-analysis that showed past major depression (MD+) to be unrelated to smoking cessation outcome. Methods: Eligible trials included 14 from our original review and 28 identified through an updated systematic review (2000-2009). We coded for assessment of past MD, exclusion for recent MD episode (MDE; ≤6 months versus no exclusion), duration/modality of cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT; face-to-face versus self-help) and other factors. To minimize influence of experimental treatments that may selectively benefit MD+ smokers we analyzed placebo/lowest intensity control arms only. Study-specific ORs for the effect of past MD on short-term (≤3 months) and long-term (≥6 months) abstinence were estimated and combined using random effects. Two-way interaction models of past MD with study methodology and treatment factors were used to evaluate hypothesized moderators of the past MD-abstinence association. Results: MD+ smokers had 17% lower odds of short-term abstinence (n = 35, OR = 0.83, 95% CI = 0.72-0.95, P = 0.009) and 19% lower odds of long-term abstinence (n = 38, OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.67-0.97, P = 0.023) than MD- smokers after excluding the sole study of varenicline because of its antidepressant properties. The association between past MD and abstinence was affected by methodological (recent MDE exclusion, type of MD assessment) and treatment (CBT modality) factors. Conclusions: Past major depression has a modest adverse effect on abstinence during and after smoking cessation treatment. An increased focus on the identification of effective treatments or treatment adaptations that eliminate this disparity in smoking cessation for MD+ smokers is needed.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2012 · Addiction

Publication Stats

1k Citations
176.41 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2006-2015
    • University of Nebraska at Lincoln
      • Department of Psychology
      Lincoln, Nebraska, United States
  • 2002-2008
    • University of Illinois at Chicago
      • Department of Psychology
      Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • 2002-2007
    • Edward Hines, Jr. VA Hospital
      Hines, Oregon, United States
  • 2001
    • Texas Tech University
      • Department of Psychology
      Lubbock, Texas, United States
  • 1998
    • Oklahoma State University - Stillwater
      • Department of Psychology
      Stillwater, OK, United States