Akira Mishima

Nagoya City University, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan

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Publications (50)70.67 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: Surgical repair for cardiac lesions has rarely been offered to patients with trisomy 18 because of their very short lifespans. We investigated the effectiveness of cardiac surgery in patients with trisomy 18. Patients and methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 20 consecutive patients with trisomy 18 and congenital cardiac anomalies who were evaluated between August, 2003 and July, 2013. All patients developed respiratory or cardiac failure due to excessive pulmonary blood flow. Patients were divided into two subgroups: one treated surgically (surgical group, n=10) and one treated without surgery (conservative group, n=10), primarily to compare the duration of survival between the groups. Results: All the patients in the surgical group underwent cardiac surgery with pulmonary artery banding, including patent ductus arteriosus ligation in nine patients and coarctation repair in one. The duration of survival was significantly longer in the surgical group than in the conservative group (495.4±512.6 versus 93.1±76.2 days, respectively; p=0.03). A Cox proportional hazard model found cardiac surgery to be a significant predictor of survival time (risk ratio of 0.12, 95% confidence interval 0.016-0.63; p=0.01). Conclusions: Cardiac surgery was effective in prolonging survival by managing high pulmonary blood flow; however, the indication for surgery should be carefully considered on a case-by-case basis, because the risk of sudden death remains even after surgery. Patients' families should be provided with sufficient information to make decisions that will optimise the quality of life for both patients and their families.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Cardiology in the Young
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    ABSTRACT: 1. The long segmental stenosis caused by concentric inflammatory mural thickening with intimai fibrosis were frequently observed in Takayasu arteritis. 2. The occlusion of common carotid (n=3) and subclavian (n=6), superior mesenteric (SMA), bil. external carotid, bil. superficial femoral artery were suspected. 3. The poststenotic dilatation of brachiocepahilic artery (n=3) and CCA(n=2), pulmonary artery (n=2) were observed. The string of pearls appearance and smooth tapered occlusion were also observed in 4 and 12 cases, respectively. 4. The calcifications were not commonly observed at the active inflammatory sites exhibiting slightly high dense on plain CT.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2015
  • Akira Mishima · Norikazu Nomura · Tomohiko Ukai · Miki Asano
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    ABSTRACT: Background and AimThe aim of this study was to evaluate the mid-term outcomes of a strategy for repair of coarctation of the aorta (CoA) and hypoplastic aortic arch (HAA) with a modified, extended end-to-end repair that preserves the lesser curvature of the aortic arch in neonates with intracardiac defects.Methods We studied 21 neonates who underwent CoA repair and remote intracardiac repair (2000–2013). Fifteen patients had HAA, and six patients had no HAA. Follow-up ranged from 0.4 to 12.8 years (median, 7.5 years), and all patients underwent cardiac catheterization and blood pressure measurement in both the arms and legs.ResultsThe overall median age at the time of CoA repair was seven days and the median age at the time of intracardiac defect repair was 18.6 months. There were no hospital deaths and one case had recoarctation (4.8%). The overall mean pressure gradient at the latest follow-up was 3.4 ± 5.7 mmHg. Critical deformation of arch geometry was not found. No patient had hypertension or an abnormal arm-leg gradient. There was no difference in the cardiac catheterization data or blood pressure between patients with and without HAA.ConclusionsA modified, extended end-to-end repair for CoA and HAA resulted in a low rate of recoarctation, no operative mortality, maintenance of a smooth rounded arch, and normal blood pressures in the arms and legs during mid-term follow-up. These results suggest that this technique may be acceptable for repair of CoA and HAA in neonates with intracardiac defects.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2014 · Journal of Cardiac Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: A 3-year-old boy with pulmonary atresia with ventricular septal defect, who had undergone placement of a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt, presented with a 1-week history of high fever. Computed tomography showed a pseudoaneurysm at the anastomosis between the right brachiocephalic artery and the graft. After intravenous antibiotic therapy, the pseudoaneurysm and infected graft were resected through a median sternotomy. This report describes successful management of a potentially fatal complication following placement of a modified Blalock-Taussig shunt.
    No preview · Article · May 2014 · Asian cardiovascular & thoracic annals
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    ABSTRACT: We report the management of infective endocarditis after an extracardiac Fontan operation. Obstruction of the infected conduit and the associated pulmonary arterial embolism led to failure of the Fontan circulation. This was managed by completely removing both the infected conduit and emboli and replacing the conduit.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2013 · Journal of Cardiac Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Aortopulmonary window (APW) with an anomalous origin of a coronary artery is extremely rare. We report surgical management of a four-week-old infant with the association of a distal type of APW and an anomalous origin of the right coronary artery (RCA) from the pulmonary artery. Complete anatomical correction comprising division of the great arteries and transferring the RCA as an autologous flap to the aortic defect was successfully performed. doi: 10.1111/jocs.12205 (J Card Surg 2013;28:767–769)
    No preview · Article · Nov 2013 · Journal of Cardiac Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: Pulmonary hypertension associated with congenital heart disease increases the risk of surgery using cardiopulmonary bypass. Sivelestat is a neutrophil elastase inhibitor thought to have a prophylactic effect against lung injury after surgery using bypass. We elucidated that Sivelestat had the protective effect on lung in patients with congenital heart disease and pulmonary hypertension who underwent surgery using bypass. This study was a controlled prospective randomized trial and enrolled 13 neonates or infants with ventricular septal defect and pulmonary hypertension. The patients were assigned to either sivelestat with the dose of 0.2 mg/kg per hour (sivelestat group, n = 7) or saline (placebo group, n = 6) from the start of bypass until 6 hours after bypass. Proinflammatory cytokines and adhesion molecules on leukocytes were measured at 10 time points during the above period. Pulmonary function was assessed perioperatively. Compared with the placebo group, the sivelestat group had significantly lower values of alveolar-arterial oxygen tension gradient at 24 hours (p = 0.038) and at 48 hours (p = 0.028) after bypass, and significantly better balance of hydration at 48 hours after bypass (p = 0.012). The sivelestat group also showed significantly lower plasma levels of interleukin-8 immediately after bypass (p = 0.041) and interleukin-10 at 15 minutes after removal of the aortic cross-clamp (p = 0.048), and immediately after bypass (p = 0.037). Administration of sivelestat during bypass prevented pulmonary damage and activities of proinflammatory cytokines at the cardiac operation in neonates or infants. Our results show that sivelestat may be considered to protect pulmonary function against the injury by bypass.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2013 · The Annals of thoracic surgery
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    M Asano · Y Nakai · H Matsumae · T Ukai · N Nomura · A Mishima

    Preview · Article · Sep 2013 · Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery
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    Yosuke Nakai · Miki Asano · Norikazu Nomura · Akira Mishima
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    ABSTRACT: An aneurysm of the left atrial appendage is an extremely rare anomaly that is commonly associated with supraventricular arrhythmia, compression of the coronary arteries, intracardiac thrombus and pulmonary venous stenosis. This condition may be caused by congenital dysplasia of the musculi pectinati and is usually diagnosed in the second to fourth decades of life. We report the surgical management of an asymptomatic 9-year old girl with this anomaly. She was referred to us because of abnormal chest X-ray findings, and investigation revealed an aneurysm of the left atrial appendage. As this condition may have potentially fatal complications, the aneurysm was completely resected under cardiac arrest with cardiopulmonary bypass to prevent recurrence and thrombus formation. We suggest that resection of an aneurysm of the left atrial appendage under cardiac arrest with cardiopulmonary bypass is a reasonable treatment option to prevent potential complications, particularly in children.
    Preview · Article · Jun 2013 · Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2009 · The Annals of thoracic surgery
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    ABSTRACT: We report the successful surgical treatment of a pseudoaneurysm of the ascending aorta in a 45-year-old man who underwent surgical closure of a ventricular septal defect at the age of 5. A computed tomography scan ordered for the investigation of a pulmonary mass happened to detect a pseudoaneurysm (20 mm diameter). The pseudoaneurysm protruded anteriorly from the ascending aorta at the previous aortic cannulation site. The ascending aorta, including the lesion, was replaced with a prosthetic graft uneventfully. The cause of the pseudoaneurysm was considered iatrogenic, since he had no prior history of postoperative mediastinitis or blunt chest trauma. A computed tomography scan is a useful means to detect a mass on the ascending aorta following cardiac surgery, and it provides important information to help define a surgical strategy.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2008 · Annals of thoracic and cardiovascular surgery: official journal of the Association of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgeons of Asia
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    ABSTRACT: We report a septic patient who had an infected thrombus that extended from the right internal jugular vein to the right atrium 1 cm below the superior venocaval junction. The thrombus was successfully removed using an off-pump shunt placed between the innominate vein and the right atrium.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2008 · The Annals of thoracic surgery
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    Norikazu Nomura · Miki Asano · Akihiro Mizuno · Akira Mishima
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    ABSTRACT: Bronchial compression due to a dilated pulmonary artery is a troublesome problem in the surgical management of infants or children with congenital heart disease. We experienced an infantile case of ventricular septal defect and prolonged respiratory insufficiency caused by right bronchial compression and left pulmonary hypoplasia. Anterior translocation of the dilated right pulmonary artery and intracardiac repair succeeded in relieving the bronchial compression and improving left pulmonary function. We advocate that this procedure is useful for bronchial compression with congenital heart disease and maldevelopment of the lung.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2008 · European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: We report the case of a 53-year-old woman with Ebstein's anomaly and intractable heart failure who had undergone only tricuspid valve replacement 30 years earlier. She was treated conservatively for 1 month; however, she was placed in the New York Heart Association functional class IV. Therefore, we operated on her with the objective of improving her quality of life and cardiac function. One-and-a-half repair and a second tricuspid valve replacement with right ventriculoplasty were quite effective in ameliorating her critical condition.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2007 · The Annals of thoracic surgery
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    ABSTRACT: We describe a case of mediastinal angioleiomyoma in an asymptomatic 72-year-old man, who was admitted to our hospital for a mediastinal tumor discovered during an annual medical examination. The tumor was evaluated by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Unenhanced CT scans demonstrated a tumor that was adjacent to the descending aorta. The tumor was partially enhanced in the early phase of contrast-enhanced CT, and in the late phase there was additional tumor enhancement. With MRI, the tumor displayed a homogeneous low signal intensity on the T1-weighted image and a homogeneous very high signal intensity on the T2-weighted image. Contrast-enhanced MRI demonstrated the same enhancement pattern as CT. The examination results led to a preoperative diagnosis of posterior mediastinal hemangioma, and the patient underwent surgery. The tumor originated from the supreme intercostal vein, and was diagnosed as an angioleiomyoma by histopathologic examination. Because mediastinal angioleiomyomas are very rare, they are difficult to diagnose preoperatively. However, we believe that CT and MRI can be of significant help in the differential diagnosis.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2007 · Journal of Thoracic Imaging
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    ABSTRACT: We recently demonstrated that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) released from sensory neurons reduces spinal cord injury (SCI) by inhibiting neutrophil activation through an increase in the endothelial production of prostacyclin (PGI(2)). Carperitide, a synthetic alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), reduces ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced tissue injury. However, its precise therapeutic mechanism(s) remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we examined whether ANP reduces I/R-induced spinal cord injury by enhancing sensory neuron activation using rats. ANP increased CGRP release and cellular cAMP levels in dorsal root ganglion neurons isolated from rats in vitro. The increase in CGRP release induced by ANP was reversed by pretreatment with capsazepine, an inhibitor of vanilloid receptor-1 activation, or with (9S, 10S, 12R)-2,3,9,10,11,12-hexahydro-10-hydroxy-9-methyl-1-oxo-9,12-epoxy-1H-diindolo[1,2,3-fg:3',2',1'-kl]pyrrolo[3,4-i][1,6]-benzodiazocine-10-carboxylic acid hexyl ester (KT5720), an inhibitor of protein kinase A (PKA), suggesting that ANP might increase CGRP release from sensory neurons by activating PKA through an increase in the cellular cAMP level. Spinal cord ischemia was induced in rats using a balloon catheter placed in the aorta. ANP reduced mortality and motor disturbances by inhibiting reduction of the number of motor neurons in animals subjected to SCI. ANP significantly enhanced I/R-induced increases in spinal cord tissue levels of CGRP and 6-keto-prostaglandin F(1alpha). a stable metabolite of PGI(2). ANP inhibited I/R-induced increases in spinal cord tissue levels of tumor necrosis factor and myeloperoxidase. Pretreatment with 4'-chloro-3-methoxycinnamanilide (SB366791), a specific vanilloid receptor-1 antagonist, and indomethacin reversed the effects of ANP. These results strongly suggest that ANP might reduce I/R-induced SCI in rats by inhibiting neutrophil activation through enhancement of sensory neuron activation.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2007 · Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics
  • M Asano · T Saito · N Nomura · A Mishima
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    ABSTRACT: To reduce the right ventricular (RV) pressure and the pressure gradient between the RV and the pulmonary artery (PA) in Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) with small pulmonary annulus, it is inevitable to enlarge the small annulus by incising and patching from RV to PA via PA annulus. If the anomalous coronary artery exists in the RV outflow tract, the procedure can not be done.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2005 · Pediatric Cardiology
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    Full-text · Article · Jan 2005 · The Annals of thoracic surgery
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    Miki Asano · Norikazu Nomura · Akira Mishima

    Full-text · Article · Sep 2004 · Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
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    ABSTRACT: The elevation of plasma L-arginine levels stimulates nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, but the underlying mechanisms are not yet understood. We examined the role of physiological changes in pulmonary arteries on endogenous NO production. Male Wistar rats were divided into following groups: (1) control rats receiving normal water orally, (2) ARG rats receiving L-arginine water orally, (3) MCT rats injected with monocrotaline (MCT) on day 0 and receiving normal water orally, and (4) MCT+ARG rats injected with MCT on day 0 and receiving L-arginine water orally. The rats were studied after 23 days of dietary intervention. In MCT+ARG rats, supplemental L-arginine exhibited a significant pulmonary vasodilatory effect, as shown by a decreased pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP) (P<0.001), decreased right ventricular hypertrophy (P<0.01), and improved endothelium-dependent relaxation (P<0.01). Also L-arginine inhibited the elevation of plasma endothelin-1 (P<0.01). Oral L-arginine administration increased plasma L-arginine levels about twofold, but in only MCT+ARG rats (i.e., not in ARG rats) did the urinary nitrate excretion significantly increase (P<0.05), which is an indicator of endogenous NO formation. Oral administration of L-arginine is effective against pulmonary vascular remodeling. The data also suggest that the initial elevation of PAP is important for the induction of endogenous NO synthesis.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2004 · Respiratory Medicine