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Publications (10)0 Total impact

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    S. Biçer · A.O. Özen · A. Vitrinel

    Full-text · Dataset · Dec 2015
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    Full-text · Article · Aug 2014
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    Ahmet Oğuzhan Özen · Suat Biçer · Ayça Vitrinel

    Full-text · Dataset · Feb 2013

  • No preview · Poster · Apr 2011
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    ABSTRACT: Primary pyomyositis, a pyogenic infection of the skeleton muscle is often seen in tropical and subtropical regions. Here we present a 5 year-old boy who presented with pain and mass in the left thigh and claudication, with no history of trauma. A diagnosis of primary pyomyositis was made on the basis of clinical, laboratory and radiological findings. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous antibiotics, with clinical improvement at the 2nd day, followed by normalization of laboratory findings at the 5th day. Primary pyomyositis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with limb pain, even in temperate climates.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2011
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: Identification of clinical features of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) associated with each causative agent and pathogen-specific prognostic factors might help developing pathogen-based therapeutic approaches. We aimed to investigate clinical features and prognostic factors of AGE due to rotavirus and adenovirus infections and to evaluate whether these two pathogens have distinctive clinical patterns. Material and Methods: We analyzed medical records of children who had been followed-up due to AGE between January 2007-April 2008 in our pediatric clinic. Clinical and laboratory data of rotavirus and adenovirus were compared with unknown etiology by viral and rutine culture studies. Results: We studied 609 patients (250 female 359 male) with a median (minimum-maximum) age of 3.0 (0.1-16.0) years. The frequencies of rotavirus and adenovirus infections were 20.6% and 3.4%, respectively. Co-infection of these two viruses was detected in 1.6% of cases. A hundred and twenty five (20.5%) patients needed hospitalization for their treatment. Both rotavirus and adenovirus infections were more common at winter and spring months. Duration of hospitalization was significantly longer in rotavirus infection compared to those with unknown etiology (p= 0.004). Risk factors independently associated with in-hospital treatment >1 day were rotavirus infection and presence of fever at presentation. 47 of 125 (37%) patients with rotavirus infection, 6 of 21 (28.6%) patients with adenovirus, 5 of 10 (50%) patients with rotavirus + adenovirus coinfection and 67 of 453 (14.8%) patients with undetectable factor were admitted to hospital (p< 0.0001). Rotavirus infection was associated with a 3.1 times greater risk for hospitalization compared to AGE of unknown etiology. Forty two percent of patients with rotavirus infection presented with a non-diarrheal symptom, with the fever as presenting symptom in 10.4%. Conclusion: Rotavirus antigen test is a valuable diagnostic tool for the assessment of prognosis in children with AGE. On the other hand adenovirus stool antigen test or stool culture did not appear to have a significant contribution in the management of children with AGE. Assessment of rotavirus might be helpful in patients presenting with fever or vomitting without a specific etiology. Especially in cases that require hospitalization, nosocomial (spread is common, especially for rotavirus diarrhea) are also recommended for the purpose of controlling contagious.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2011 · Turkiye Klinikleri Pediatri
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    S. Biçer · A.O. Özen · A. Vitrinel
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of this study is to compare the various paediatric weight estimation formulae and to devise a simple age-based method for estimating weight that is more accurate than the other formulae. Material and Methods: This cross sectional study was performed on healthy school children between ages of 3-18 years. By linear regression analysis we developed a new formula that estimates body weight using age of the subjects. Besides assessing the predictive role of this formula we investigated accuracy of six different formulae commonly used for this purpose and compared their efficacies for various age intervals. The difference between measured weight and that derived using formulae was calculated and expressed as a percentage of the estimated weight rather than a kilogram value. Results: We studied on 2319 children. Regression analysis revealed the formula [weight=4x age(yrs)-3] to predict body weight using age of subjects for the entire age groups. The formula weight=2(age+4) underestimated children's weights by a mean of 22.8% in all ages. The formula weight=3(age)+6 proved the most accurate with a mean underestimate of just 3.08% between 3-6 ages and new formula proved the most accurate with a mean incorrect prediction of just 3.94% between 7-18 ages. Conclusion: The use of two formulas may be more accurate overall given the change in gradient of the age-weight curve at approximately 6-7 years of age. We recommend the formula weight (kg)=3(age)+6 for 3-6 years and the new formula [weight (kg)=4(age)-3] for 7-18 years.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2010 · Turkiye Klinikleri Pediatri
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    Suat Biçer · Ahmet Oğuzhan Özen · Ayça Vitrinel
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: The aim of this study is to compare the various paediatric weight estimation formulae and to devise a simple age-based method for estimating weight that is more accurate than the other formulae. Material and Methods: This cross sectional study was performed on healthy school children between ages of 3-18 years. By linear regression analysis we developed a new formula that estimates body weight using age of the subjects. Besides assessing the predictive role of this formula we investigated accuracy of six different formulae commonly used for this purpose and compared their efficacies for various age intervals. The difference between measured weight and that derived using formulae was calculated and expressed as a percentage of the estimated weight rather than a kilogram value. Results: We studied on 2319 children. Regression analysis revealed the formula [weight=4x age(yrs)-3] to predict body weight using age of subjects for the entire age groups. The formula weight=2(age+4) underestimated children's weights by a mean of 22.8% in all ages. The formula weight=3(age)+6 proved the most accurate with a mean underestimate of just 3.08% between 3-6 ages and new formula proved the most accurate with a mean incorrect prediction of just 3.94% between 7-18 ages. Conclusion: The use of two formulas may be more accurate overall given the change in gradient of the age-weight curve at approximately 6-7 years of age. We recommend the formula weight (kg)=3(age)+6 for 3-6 years and the new formula [weight (kg)=4(age)-3] for 7-18 years.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2010 · Turkiye Klinikleri Pediatri
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    ABSTRACT: Ultrasound bone measurement in healthy Turkish children and adolescents was evaluated. Relationships between pubertal status, anthropometry, physical activity, dietary intake of calcium and several parameters with bone mineral density (BMD) were analyzed. 36 prepubertal and 37 pubertal children participated in the study. Calculation of calcium intake was based on consumption of dairy products. 19.6% of children had a BMD z score below -2 and 40.9% had a BMD z score below -1. Only 28.8% of children had a dairy calcium intake above the recommended daily allowance (RDA). Children participating in sport activities more than 3 hours per week had better z score values. No relation was found between BMD and having a history of fracture, obesity and intake of gaseous drinks. There was no relation between calcium intake or BMD. We found that bone stiffness in children is determined by pubertal status and physical activity rather than by calcium intake.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2007 · Cocuk Sagligi ve Hastaliklari Dergisi
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    ABSTRACT: Turkey). Ultrasound bone density measurements of prepubertal and pubertal children and factors determining bone mineral density. Çocuk Sağlığı ve Hastalıkları Dergisi 2007; 49: 231-235. Ultrasound bone measurement in healthy Turkish children and adolescents was evaluated. Relationships between pubertal status, anthropometry, physical activity, dietary intake of calcium and several parameters with bone mineral density (BMD) were analyzed. 36 prepubertal and 37 pubertal children participated in the study. Calculation of calcium intake was based on consumption of dairy products. 19.6% of children had a BMD z score below -2 and 40.9% had a BMD z score below -1. Only 28.8% of children had a dairy calcium intake above the recommended daily allowance (RDA). Children participating in sport activities more than 3 hours per week had better z score values. No relation was found between BMD and having a history of fracture, obesity and intake of gaseous drinks. There was no relation between calcium intake or BMD. We found that bone stiffness in children is determined by pubertal status and physical activity rather than by calcium intake.
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