Antoni Novotni

Ss. Cyril and Methodius University, Skopie, Karpoš, Macedonia

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Publications (14)13.38 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The main goal of psychiatric care is not to be focused only on reducing psychopathological symptoms, but on improvement of the patient's quality of life.AIM: To examine validation and reliability SQLS-R4 among patients with schizophrenia.METHODS: The sample consisted of 61 outpatients with schizophrenia attending the Psychiatry Hospital “Skopje”. Inclusion criteria for subject selection were: 1) age more than 18 years, 2) clinically stable (not acutely ill or has not been recently hospitalized at least for the past 3 months). They completed SQLS-R4 and SF36 questioners.RESULTS: The internal consistency reliability was satisfactory for both the psychosocial and vitality domains (Cronbach’s α = 0.928, 0.83). Most of the items were significantly correlated with own scale score (from 0.189 to 0.687). The average of the score for the psychosocial quality life was 39.9 ± 8.6 (sometimes), for the cognition and vitality was 26.5 ± 6.1 (sometimes) (SQLS-R4). There was moderate correlation between SF 36-energy with SQOLS - motivation and energy; SF 36-mental health correlation with SQOLS-psychosocial.CONCLUSION: SQLS-R4 appears to offer excellent potential as an easily administered and patient acceptable assessment and monitoring measure of quality of life (QoL). However, a principle psychometric criterion crucial to the use and validity of the instrument concerns the underlying factor structure.
    Preview · Article · Jan 2016

  • No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · European Neuropsychopharmacology
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    ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: One of the main objectives of this paper is to analyze the associations between childhood abuse, household dysfunction and the risk of attempting suicide among young adolescents in the country.METHOD: A representative sample consisted of total 1277 students (58.6% female and 41.6% male), aged 18 and above in year four of 664 secondary school and 613 first- and second-year university students. The data were obtained using Adverse Childhood Experiences Study Questionnaires (Family Health History Questionnaire) for collecting information on child maltreatment, household dysfunction and other socio-behavioural factors, applying WHO/CDC-recommended methodology. Statistical significance was set up at p<0.05.RESULTS: Emotional neglect, physical abuse and physical neglect were the most frequent abusive experiences students had. Overall, suicide attempts were reported by 3.1 % of respondents (4.7% by females and 0.8% by males). Those respondents who had been emotionally abused were almost three times as likely to attempt suicide, physical abuse almost doubles the chances of attempting suicide, substance abuse in the family increased the chances 2.3 times for attempting suicide, violent treatment of the mother almost quadrupled them for attempted suicide, having a family member who had been in prison increased the odds of almost 3.5 times for attempting suicide. Attempted suicide was found to be 1.5 times more likely as the number of ACEs reached 3 and 3.4 times more likely as the number of adverse childhood experiences reached four or more. CONCLUSION: Identifying and treating children, adolescents and young adults who have been affected by adverse childhood experiences may have substantial value in our evolving efforts to prevent suicide.
    Preview · Article · Jun 2014
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    ABSTRACT: A growing body of evidence shows that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in depressive disorder. Serum BDNF levels are lower in depressed patients and they increase after a long course of antidepressant treatment. Our study aims to test the effect of antidepressant treatment on serum BDNF levels in patients with a depressive episode, after they have achieved remission in two studies in Macedonia and Bulgaria. In the Macedonian study 23 patients were included (11 female, 12 male) diagnosed with a first depressive episode according to ICD-10, as well as 23 control subjects age- and sex-matched without a history of psychiatric disorder. In the Bulgarian study 10 female patients with depression and 10 control subjects were included. We have applied the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) to assess depression severity. Blood samples were collected before antidepressive treatment and after remission was achieved (decrease to 7 points or less on HDRS). In the Macedonian study, mean serum BDNF level at baseline was 13.15±6.75 ng/ml and the mean HDRS score was 28.52±4.02. Untreated depressed patients showed significantly lower serum BDNF levels compared to the control group (25.95±9.17 ng/ml). After remission was achieved, the mean serum BDNF level was 24.73±11.80 ng/ml whereas the mean HDRS score was 7.04±3.15. After 8 weeks of treatment there was no statistically significant difference in the serum BDNF levels between the two groups. In the Bulgarian study, baseline mean serum BDNF levels were 26.84±8.66 ng/ml, after 3 weeks treatment and remission was achieved mean serum BDNF levels were 30.33±9.25 ng/ml and in the control group mean serum BDNF levels were 25.04±2.88 ng/ml. Integrated results showed baseline mean serum BDNF levels of 17.30±9.66 ng/ml, after achieved remission 26.43±11.25 ng/ml and in the control group mean serum BDNF levels of 25.68±7.76 ng/ml. The Bulgarian results showed no statistical difference between the depressed group and controls. The Integrated results and the Macedonian study supported previous findings of low BDNF levels in untreated depressive patients compared to healthy controls, and that those levels increase after antidepressant treatment. These results may suggest that low serum levels of BDNF are a state abnormality that is evident during depression and normalizes during remission.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2013 · Psychiatria Danubina
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    ABSTRACT: Background: A growing body of evidence shows that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in depressive disorder. Serum BDNF levels are lower in depressed patients and they increase after a long course of antidepressant treatment. Our study aims to test the effect of antidepressant treatment on serum BDNF levels in patients with a depressive episode, after they have achieved remission in two studies in Macedonia and Bulgaria. Subjects and methods: In the Macedonian study 23 patients were included (11 female, 12 male) diagnosed with a first depressive episode according to ICD-10, as well as 23 control subjects age-and sex-matched without a history of psychiatric disorder. In the Bulgarian study 10 female patients with depression and 10 control subjects were included. We have applied the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) to assess depression severity. Blood samples were collected before antidepressive treatment and after remission was achieved (decrease to 7 points or less on HDRS). Results: In the Macedonian study, mean serum BDNF level at baseline was 13.15±6.75 ng/ml and the mean HDRS score was 28.52±4.02. Untreated depressed patients showed significantly lower serum BDNF levels compared to the control group (25.95±9.17 ng/ml). After remission was achieved, the mean serum BDNF level was 24.73±11.80 ng/ml whereas the mean HDRS score was 7.04±3.15. After 8 weeks of treatment there was no statistically significant difference in the serum BDNF levels between the two groups. In the Bulgarian study, baseline mean serum BDNF levels were 26.84±8.66 ng/ml, after 3 weeks treatment and remission was achieved mean serum BDNF levels were 30.33±9.25 ng/ml and in the control group mean serum BDNF levels were 25.04±2.88 ng/ml. Integrated results showed baseline mean serum BDNF levels of 17.30±9.66 ng/ml, after achieved remission 26.43±11.25 ng/ml and in the control group mean serum BDNF levels of 25.68±7.76 ng/ml. Conclusion: The Bulgarian results showed no statistical difference between the depressed group and controls. The Integrated results and the Macedonian study supported previous findings of low BDNF levels in untreated depressive patients compared to healthy controls, and that those levels increase after antidepressant treatment. These results may suggest that low serum levels of BDNF are a state abnormality that is evident during depression and normalizes during remission.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2013

  • No preview · Article · Jun 2012
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    ABSTRACT: Gender issues are extensively explored in schizophrenia. A mounting body of research evidence suggests that there are gender differences in the age at onset, duration of untreated psychosis and presented psychopathology. In recent years, in order to obtain neurophysiologic explanation for the disturbed behavior and thinking in schizophrenia, numerous studies have been performed focusing on the QEEG parameters. However, the results were inconclusive. The aim of this study was to investigate the gender differences in some clinical and QEEG parameters in schizophrenia patients. Thirty schizophrenia patients were enrolled in the study (M/F ratio 13/17; mean age 34 years). The QEEG parameters which were analyzed were amplitude, mean frequency and relative power of the main bands of the basic activity. Clinical assessment was performed using the PANSS, BPRS and CGI scales. QEEG parameters demonstrating statistically significant difference were amplitude and relative power in beta activity and lower mean theta frequency over left frontal, temporal and parietal regions in female patients who also had statistically significant differences in PANSS and BPRS scores. Differences in amplitude and relative power in the beta bands in female schizophrenic patients are associated with more severe actual psychopathology. Considering the relatively small sample, the current results must be replicated with a larger group of drug-free patients to confirm the findings.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2012 · Psychiatria Danubina
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    ABSTRACT: Background: The relation of the childhood abuse with anxiety disorders is reported in numerous studies. Aim: Relation between the childhood abuse and level of manifested anxiety in adult patients with anxiety disorders. Material and Methods: The severity of the emotional and physical childhood abuse is measured with the CTQ, while the level of manifest anxiety of the patients is measured with the TMAS. Both questionnaires were administered to 96 patients with AD (32 with panic disorder, 32 with social phobia and 32 with generalized anxiety disorder) according ICD10. Results: In 35.42% of the examined patients was found abuse during the childhood. Childhood emotional abuse was higher among female patients. There is a statistically significant difference in the severity of the manifest anxiety between various groups of AD. Statistically significant relation between the physical and emotional abuse in childhood and the level of manifest anxiety of all three clinical groups that were examined was found. Conclusion: These findings confirm the correlation between childhood physical and emotional abuse and the level of manifest anxiety in adult patients with anxiety disorders.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2012 · Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: The sleep-related problems of shift workers usually occur as transient phenomena related to the timing of work. Sleep disorders, related to sleep deprivation, have a major impact on the quality of life and health status of healthcare workers. Reduced quantity and quality of sleep negatively affects the activities of shift workers, particularly in terms of their social functioning, quality of life and health. However, it seems that health authorities and the medical staff are negligent when it comes to the negative effects on health caused by work in night shifts. Recently published studies in this field suggest that appropriate public health preventive programs dealing with sleep disorders successfully contribute towards the quality of life of workers.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2011 · EPMA Journal, The
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    ABSTRACT: (Full text is available at http://www.manu.edu.mk/prilozi). The aim of the study was to investigate the gender differences in patients with schizophrenia in age of onset, other demographic and clinical characteristics and their relationship with QEEG power spectrum measures. Material and Methods: Thirty patients with schizophrenia were enrolled in the study, 17 female and 13 male, mean age 34 years. Comprehensive assessment of the symptoms of schizophrenia was performed using PANSS (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale), BPRS (Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale) and CGI (Clinical Global Impression) scale. The age of onset of schizophrenia and the duration of psychosis was assessed using the medical history and parts of the IRAOS (Interview for Retrospective Assessment of Onset of Schizophrenia). Results: Female patients had more severe psychopathology with statistically significant differences in PANSS and BPRS scores (larger total scores) and on the positive subscale of PANSS. QEEG power spectrum showed statistical significant difference only for the beta band in female patients. Women were less employed and had longer duration of illness and previous treatment. There were no differences in the mean age of onset of the disease (26 years in male and 25 years in female patients) and in the familiar occurrence. Conclusion: Fast basic activity in beta bands was associated with female patients with schizophrenia who presented more severe psychopathology and had longer duration of the disease and previous treatment. Considering the relatively small sample the current results must be replicated with a larger group of subjects to confirm the findings. Key words: schizophrenia, gender, QEEG, PANSS.
    Preview · Article · Jul 2011 · Prilozi / Makedonska akademija na naukite i umetnostite, Oddelenie za biološki i medicinski nauki = Contributions / Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Section of Biological and Medical Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: (Full text is available at http://www.manu.edu.mk/prilozi). Aim of the paper: To monitor personal and social functioning in patients with schizophrenia and to find out the difference regarding sociodemographic characteristics and out-patient or day hospital treatment. Material and methods: The investigation included 120 subjects divided into two groups of 60 patients each with a diagnosis F20 according to MKD 10 criteria. Patients from the first group received out-patient care whereas those from the second group had day hospital treatment. Patients were of different age and gender, receiving regular antipsychotic therapy. They were included in individual and group psychosocial therapeutic procedures during the day hospital treatment. The investigation utilized the following diagnostic instruments: standardized clinical interview and PSP scale, Personal and social performance scale, Morosini, Magliano et al. 2000, and a non-standardized questionnaire of sociodemographic data, family support and existence of mental disorder in other family members. Results: The results obtained have shown better personal and social functioning in patients who had family support, in those who are employed, in those with no mental disorder in other family members and in patients on day hospital treatment as opposed to patients receiving out-patient care. Conclusion: Day hospital psychosocial therapeutic treatment in combination with regular antipsychotic therapy, family and social support helps in more rapid reintegration and resocialization and a better quality of life in patients with schizophrenia. Key words: quality of life, personal and social functioning, schizophrenia.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2010 · Prilozi / Makedonska akademija na naukite i umetnostite, Oddelenie za biološki i medicinski nauki = Contributions / Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Section of Biological and Medical Sciences
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    ABSTRACT: In Balkan countries, as in all Europe, forensic psychiatry as a subspecialty between psychiatry and legal medicine, an interface between mental health and the law, is focused on assessment and treatment of people with mental disorder who show antisocial or violent behavior. Thus, the authors thought that to show the actual situation of forensic psychiatry in their countries would be more interesting than only to review some articles published in these last 2 years in this part of the world. The article also includes some review about forensic psychiatry in prison in Bulgaria, Serbia and Russia and about a recent book published in Bulgaria. After a brief history of forensic psychiatry in some Balkan countries, the authors describe the services, the high and medium secure units found in forensic hospitals or in general psychiatry hospitals, which are still limited, where mentally disordered offenders are treated. Because of our society's values, individual freedom and civil liberties, questions about the right to treatment (or the right to refuse treatment), involuntary hospitalization, and other legal and ethical issues have no easy answers. Ethical questions remain in dispute, like patient's needs vs. social needs and human rights, legality vs. morality.The quality standards must be improved, especially those concerning elementary care needs and quality of life of forensic psychiatry patients (accommodation, food, sheltered housing, sheltered work places and community involvement). Ways will be found to protect human rights and avoid any abuse of psychiatry.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2010 · Current opinion in psychiatry
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    Dimitar Bonevski · Antoni Novotni
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    ABSTRACT: Numerous authors associate child abuse with serious long-term consequences to the general and psychological well-being in particular. Clinical research to date reveals strong correlation between childhood abuse and neglect and anxiety disorders, especially panic disorder. This study was conducted in order to assess the level of emotional, physical and sexual childhood abuse as well as the physical and emotional childhood neglect in 40 adult patients suffering from panic disorder, diagnosed in accordance with the 10th International Classification of Disorders diagnostic criteria, compared with the control group of 40 healthy test subjects without a history of psychiatric disorders, using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. The severity of the clinical manifestation in patients with panic disorder was assessed using the Panic Disorder Severity Scale. There were no significant differences between the groups as to the level of sexual abuse and physical neglect, whereas in the group of patients with panic disorder, the level of physical and emotional abuse was significantly higher, with emphasis on emotional neglect. With regards to the correlation between the severity of the clinical manifestation in patients with panic disorder and the severity of suffered abuse and neglect in childhood age, significant correlation was found in the physical and emotional abuse as well as emotional neglect. There was no significant correlation in the aspect of the physical neglect and sexual abuse. Our research underlines the importance of childhood physical abuse, and especially emotional abuse and emotional neglect in the occurrence of panic disorder later in life.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2008 · Medicinski pregled
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    ABSTRACT: This study was designed to assess the incidence of child emotional and physical abuse, associated risk factors and psychosocial symptoms in a cross-cultural comparison between post-communist bloc countries. Method: One-thousand one-hundred forty-five children ages 10-14 from Latvia (N = 297), Lithuania ( N = 300), Macedonia (N = 302), and Moldova (N = 246) participated in the study. They completed questionnaires assessing their experience of emotional or physical abuse, and provided information about family risk-factors and psychosocial symptoms, including PTSD-related symptoms. Incidence rates of maltreatment differed by country, as did levels of reported psychosocial symptoms. Incidence of emotional and physical abuse differed by region, with higher levels of abuse reported in the rural regions. In all four countries, a similar association between emotional/physical abuse and psychosocial symptoms was found, with the uniformly largest correlation between emotional abuse and anger. When examining the combined scores of emotional and physcial abuse, even higher correlation's were found, particularly in relation to anger and depression. In all four countries, parental overuse of alcohol was associated with emotional and/or physical abuse. Findings show differences by country in child-reported levels of emotional and physical abuse, but similar patterns of correlation with psychosocial symptoms and the risk factors of parental alcohol overuse and living in a rural area.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2004 · Child Abuse & Neglect