Xiaoyun Shen

Chongqing University of Science & Technology, Ch’ung-ch’ing-shih, Chongqing Shi, China

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Publications (3)5.94 Total impact

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    Xiaoyun Shen · Jinhua Zhang · Renduo Zhang
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    ABSTRACT: Guizhou semi-fine wool sheep are affected by a disease, characterized by emaciation, lameness, stiffness in the gait, enlargement of the costochondral junctions, and abnormal curvature in the long bones. The objective of this study was to determine possible relationships between the disease and mineral deficiencies. Samples of tissue and blood were collected from affected and unaffected sheep. Samples of soil and forage were collected from affected and unaffected areas. The samples were used for biochemical analyses and mineral nutrient measurements. Results showed that phosphorus (P) concentrations in forage samples from affected areas were significantly lower than those from unaffected areas (P < 0.01) and the mean ratio of calcium (Ca) to P in the affected forage was 12:1. Meanwhile, P concentrations of blood, bone, tooth, and wool from the affected sheep were also significantly lower than those from the unaffected group (P < 0.01). Serum P levels of the affected animals were much lower than those of the unaffected ones, whereas serum alkaline phosphatase levels from the affected were significantly higher than those from the unaffected (P < 0.01). Inorganic P levels of the affected sheep were about half of those in the control group. Oral administration of disodium hydrogen phosphate prevented and cured the disease. The study clearly demonstrated that the disease of Guizhou semi-fine wool sheep was mainly caused by the P deficiency in forage, as a result of fenced pasture and animal habitat fragmentation.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014 · PLoS ONE
  • Xiaoyun Shen · Renduo Zhang
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    ABSTRACT: Wild yak (Bos mutus) are affected by a disorder known colloquially as "stiffness of extremities disease," characterized by emaciation, lameness, stiffness in the gait, enlargement of the costochondral junctions, and abnormal curvature in the long bones. Results from preliminary epidemiologic and clinical observations suggested that this was a local, nutritional and metabolic disease associated with some mineral deficiency. Our objective was to determine the possible relationship between this disease and phosphorus (P) deficiency. We found that P concentrations in forage samples from affected areas were significantly lower than were those from unaffected areas, and the mean calcium:P ratio in the affected forage was 14:1. Phosphorus concentrations of blood, bone, teeth, and hair from affected yak were also significantly lower than were those from reference yak. Serum P levels of affected animals were much lower than were those of reference yak, whereas serum alkaline phosphatase levels were significantly higher than were those from reference yak. The P deficiency disease could be cured with supplement of disodium hydrogen phosphate (Na(2)HPO(4)). We conclude that the disease is mainly caused by P deficiency in forage.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2012 · Journal of wildlife diseases
  • Xiaoyun Shen · Xia Li · Renduo Zhang
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    ABSTRACT: Clinical signs of a disease locally referred to as "unsteady gait disease" for the Tibetan gazelle (Procapra picticaudata) were observed in the Qinghai Lake watershed area, China. The objective of this study was to determine if there was a relationship between the disease and copper (Cu) deficiency. Chemical examinations showed that Cu concentrations in soil and forage samples were similar from areas where gazelles were affected and unaffected. However, concentrations of sulfur (S) and molybdenum (Mo) in the soil and forage samples from the affected area were significantly higher than those from the unaffected areas (P<0.01). Copper concentrations in samples of blood, hair, and liver from the affected gazelles were significantly lower than those in unaffected animals (P<0.01). Supplementation of CuSO(4) in affected gazelles improved their appetite and vigor. We conclude that the disorder of Tibetan gazelles was caused by Cu deficiency, attributable to the high S and Mo content in forage.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2010 · Journal of wildlife diseases

Publication Stats

8 Citations
5.94 Total Impact Points

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Institutions

  • 2012-2014
    • Chongqing University of Science & Technology
      Ch’ung-ch’ing-shih, Chongqing Shi, China