P. G. Pérez-González

Complutense University of Madrid, Madrid, Madrid, Spain

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Publications (238)804.82 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Dust attenuation affects nearly all observational aspects of galaxy evolution, yet very little is known about the functional form of the dust-attenuation law in the distant Universe. In this work, we fit to the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of galaxies under different assumptions about the wavelength-dependent dust-attenuation curve, and compare the inferred attenuation with the observed infrared (IR) luminosities. This is applied to a sample of IR-luminous galaxies at z~1.5-3 where the multi-wavelength CANDELS photometry cover rest-frame ultraviolet (UV, down to Lyman-alpha) to near-IR (NIR) wavelengths, with supporting 24 micron imaging from Spitzer. We fit the UV-to-NIR galaxy SEDs with multiple dust laws, and use Bayes factors to select galaxies with strong preference between laws. Importantly, we find that for individual galaxies with strong Bayes-factor evidence, their observed location on the plane of the infrared excess (IRX, LIR/LUV) and UV slope (beta) agrees with the predicted value for the favored dust law. Furthermore, a parameterization of the dust law reveals a relationship between its UV-to-optical slope (delta) and the color excess. Galaxies with high color excess have a shallower, starburst-like attenuation, and those with low color excess have a steeper, SMC-like attenuation. Surprisingly, the shape of the dust law does not depend on stellar mass, star-formation rate, or beta, at least for galaxies down to the stellar mass range of this work (log Mstar/Msun >9). The strong correlation between the tilt of the attenuation law, and color excess is consistent with expected effects from an attenuation driven by scattering, a mixed star-dust geometry, and/or trends with stellar population age, metallicity, and dust grain composition.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015
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    ABSTRACT: We introduce a new color-selection technique to identify high-redshift, massive galaxies that are systematically missed by Lyman-break selection. The new selection is based on the H_{160} and IRAC 4.5um bands, specifically H - [4.5] > 2.25 mag. These galaxies, dubbed "HIEROs", include two major populations that can be separated with an additional J - H color. The populations are massive and dusty star-forming galaxies at z > 3 (JH-blue) and extremely dusty galaxies at z < 3 (JH-red). The 350 arcmin^2 of the GOODS-N and GOODS-S fields with the deepest HST/WFC3 and IRAC data contain 285 HIEROs down to [4.5] < 24 mag. We focus here primarily on JH-blue (z > 3) HIEROs, which have a median photometric redshift z ~4.4 and stellar massM_{*}~10^{10.6} Msun, and are much fainter in the rest-frame UV than similarly massive Lyman-break galaxies (LBGs). Their star formation rates (SFRs) reaches ~240 Msun yr^{-1} leading to a specific SFR, sSFR ~4.2 Gyr^{-1}, suggesting that the sSFRs for massive galaxies continue to grow at z > 2 but at a lower growth rate than from z=0 to z=2. With a median half-light radius of 2 kpc, including ~20% as compact as quiescent galaxies at similar redshifts, JH-blue HIEROs represent perfect star-forming progenitors of the most massive (M_{*} > 10^{11.2} Msun) compact quiescent galaxies at z ~ 3 and have the right number density. HIEROs make up ~60% of all galaxies with M_{*} > 10^{10.5} Msun identified at z > 3 from their photometric redshifts. This is five times more than LBGs with nearly no overlap between the two populations. While HIEROs make up 15-25% of the total SFR density at z ~ 4-5, they completely dominate the SFR density taking place in M_{*} >10^{10.5} Msun galaxies, and are therefore crucial to understanding the very early phase of massive galaxy formation.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: We present a catalog of visual like H-band morphologies of $\sim50.000$ galaxies ($H_{f160w}<24.5$) in the 5 CANDELS fields (GOODS-N, GOODS-S, UDS, EGS and COSMOS). Morphologies are estimated with Convolutional Neural Networks (ConvNets). The median redshift of the sample is $ \sim1.25$. The algorithm is trained on GOODS-S for which visual classifications are publicly available and then applied to the other 4 fields. Following the CANDELS main morphology classification scheme, our model retrieves the probabilities for each galaxy of having a spheroid, a disk, presenting an irregularity, being compact or point source and being unclassifiable. ConvNets are able to predict the fractions of votes given a galaxy image with zero bias and $\sim10\%$ scatter. The fraction of miss-classifications is less than $1\%$. Our classification scheme represents a major improvement with respect to CAS (Concentration-Asymmetry-Smoothness)-based methods, which hit a $20-30\%$ contamination limit at high z. The catalog is released with the present paper via the $\href{http://rainbowx.fis.ucm.es/Rainbow_navigator_public}{Rainbow\,database}$
    Preview · Article · Sep 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series
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    ABSTRACT: We study the evolution of the core (r<1 kpc) and effective (r<r_e) stellar-mass surface densities, in star-forming and quiescent galaxies. Since z=3, both populations occupy distinct, linear relations in log(Sigma_e) and log(Sigma_1) vs. log(M). These structural relations exhibit slopes and scatter that remain almost constant with time while their normalizations decline. For SFGs, the normalization declines by less than a factor of 2 from z=3, in both Sigma_e and Sigma_1. Such mild declines suggest that SFGs build dense cores by growing along these relations. We define this evolution as the structural main sequence (Sigma-MS). Quiescent galaxies follow different relations (Sigma^Q_e, Sigma^Q_1) off the Sigma-MS by having higher densities than SFGs of the same mass and redshift. The normalization of Sigma^Q_e declines by a factor of 10 since z=3, but only a factor of 2 in Sigma^Q_1. Thus, the common denominator for quiescent galaxies at all redshifts is the presence of a dense stellar core, and the formation of such cores in SFGs is the main requirement for quenching. Expressed in 2D as deviations off the SFR-MS and off Sigma^Q_1 at each redshift, the distribution of massive galaxies forms a universal, L-shaped sequence that relates two fundamental physical processes: compaction and quenching. Compaction is a process of substantial core-growth in SFGs relative to that in the Sigma-MS. This process increases the core-to-total mass and Sersic index, thereby, making compact SFGs. Quenching occurs once compact SFGs reach a maximum central density above Sigma^Q_1 > 9.5 M_sun/kpc^2. This threshold provides the most effective selection criterion to identify the star-forming progenitors of quiescent galaxies at all redshifts.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015
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    ABSTRACT: We present a complete census of all 263 Herschel-detected sources within the HST Frontier Fields (HFF), a deep multi-filter HST programme covering six massive lensing clusters. We provide a robust legacy catalogue of Herschel fluxes, primarily based on imaging from the Herschel Lensing Survey (HLS) and PEP/HerMES Key Programmes. Photometry is derived via a simultaneous PSF-fit using priors from archival Spitzer imaging. We optimally combine Herschel, Spitzer and WISE infrared (IR) photometry with data from HST, VLA and ground-based observatories, identifying optical counterparts to gain source redshifts. Hence for each Herschel-detected source we also present magnification factor (mu), intrinsic IR luminosity and characteristic dust temperature, providing a comprehensive view of dust-obscured star formation within the HFF. We demonstrate the utility of our catalogues through an exploratory overview of HST morphologies for the IR-bright population. In particular we briefly describe the highest redshift (z>2.5) and most magnified (mu>4) sources in the gravitationally lensed background.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015
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    ABSTRACT: In this paper, we present a comprehensive analysis of star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at intermediate redshifts (z~1). We combine the ultra-deep optical spectro-photometric data from the SHARDS survey with deep UV-to-FIR observations in the GOODS-N field to build and characterize a complete sample of SFGs at z~0.84 and z~1.23. Exploiting two of the 25 SHARDS medium-band filters, F687W17 and F823W17, we select [OII] emission line galaxies (ELGs) at z~0.84 and z~1.23 and characterize their physical properties. Their rest-frame equivalent widths (EWrf([OII])), line fluxes, luminosities, star formation rates (SFRs) and dust attenuation properties are investigated. The evolution of the EWrf([OII]) closely follows the SFR density evolution of the Universe, with a EWrf([OII])$\propto$(1+z)$^3$ trend up to redshift z~1, followed by a possible flattening. The SF properties of the galaxies selected on the basis of their [OII] emission are compared with complementary samples of SFGs selected by their MIR and FIR emission, and also with a general mass-selected sample of galaxies at the same redshifts. We observationally demonstrate that the UVJ diagram (or, similarly, a cut in the specific SFR) is only partially able to distinguish the quiescent galaxies from the SFGs. The SFR-M$_*$ relation is investigated for the different samples, finding a logarithmic slope ~1, in good agreement with previous results. The dust attenuations derived from different SFR indicators (UV(1600), UV(2800), [OII], IR) are compared, finding clear trends with respect to both the stellar mass and total SFR, with more massive and highly star-forming galaxies being affected by stronger dust attenuation. The full SHARDS dataset allows the extension of this study to other redshifts and emission lines, thus providing a powerful tool for the study of ELGs up to high redshifts. (Abridged)
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: The Star Formation Rate (SFR) is one of the main parameters used to analyze the evolution of galaxies through time. The need for recovering the light reprocessed by dust commonly requires the use of low spatial resolution far-infrared data. Recombination-line luminosities provide an alternative, although uncertain dust-extinction corrections based on narrow-band imaging or long-slit spectroscopy have traditionally posed a limit to their applicability. Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) is clearly the way to overcome such limitation. We obtain integrated H{\alpha}, ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR)-based SFR measurements for 272 galaxies from the CALIFA survey at 0.005 < z < 0.03 using single-band and hybrid tracers. We provide updated calibrations, both global and split by properties (including stellar mass and morphological type), referred to H{\alpha}. The extinction-corrected H{\alpha} luminosity agrees with the updated hybrid SFR estimators based on either UV or H{\alpha} plus IR luminosity over the full range of SFRs (0.03-20 M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$). The coefficient that weights the amount of energy produced by newly-born stars that is reprocessed by dust on the hybrid tracers, a$_{IR}$, shows a large dispersion. However, it does not became increasingly small at high attenuations, as expected if significant highly-obscured H$\alpha$ emission would be missed. Lenticulars, early-type spirals and type-2 AGN host galaxies show smaller coefficients due to the contribution of optical photons and AGN to dust heating. In the Local Universe the H{\alpha} luminosity derived from IFS observations can be used to measure SFR, at least in statistically-significant, optically-selected galaxy samples. The analysis of the SFR calibrations by galaxies properties could be potentially used by other works to study the impact of different selection criteria in the SFR values derived.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · Astronomy and Astrophysics
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    ABSTRACT: The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is called to revolutionise essentially all areas of Astrophysics. With a collecting area of about a square kilometre, the SKA will be a transformational instrument, and its scientific potential will go beyond the interests of astronomers. Its technological challenges and huge cost requires a multinational effort, and Europe has recognised this by putting the SKA on the roadmap of the European Strategy Forum for Research Infrastructures (ESFRI). The Spanish SKA White Book is the result of the coordinated effort of 119 astronomers from 40 different research centers. The book shows the enormous scientific interest of the Spanish astronomical community in the SKA and warrants an optimum scientific exploitation of the SKA by Spanish researchers, if Spain enters the SKA project.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015
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    ABSTRACT: [abridged] We quantify the morphological evolution of z~0 massive galaxies ($M*/M_\odot\sim10^{11}$) from z~3 in the 5 CANDELS fields. The progenitors are selected using abundance matching techniques to account for the mass growth. The morphologies strongly evolve from z~3. At z<1, the population matches the massive end of the Hubble sequence, with 30% of spheroids, 50% of galaxies with equally dominant disk and bulge components and 20% of disks. At z~2-3 there is a majority of irregular systems (~60-70%) with still 30% of spheroids. We then analyze the SFRs, gas fractions and structural properties for the different morphologies independently. Our results suggest two distinct channels for the growth of bulges in massive galaxies. Around 30-40% were already bulges at z~2.5, with low average SFRs and gas-fractions (10-15%), high Sersic indices (n>3-4) and small effective radii ($R_e$~1 kpc) pointing towards an early formation through gas-rich mergers or VDI. Between z~ 2.5 and z~0, they rapidly increase their size by a factor of ~4-5, become all passive but their global morphology remains unaltered. The structural evolution is independent of the gas fractions, suggesting that it is driven by ex-situ events. The remaining 60% experience a gradual morphological transformation, from clumpy disks to more regular bulge+disks systems, essentially happening at z>1. It results in the growth of a significant bulge component (n~3) for 2/3 of the systems possibly through the migration of clumps while the remaining 1/3 keeps a rather small bulge (n~1.5-2). The transition phase between disturbed and relaxed systems and the emergence of the bulge is correlated with a decrease of the star formation activity and the gas fractions. The growth of the effective radii scales roughly with $H(z)^{-1}$ and it is therefore consistent with the expected growth of disks in galaxy haloes.
    Preview · Article · Jun 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    Dataset: 1407.5097v2

    Full-text · Dataset · May 2015
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    ABSTRACT: Several authors have reported that the dynamical masses of massive compact galaxies (M⋆ ≳ 1011 M⊙, re ∼ 1 kpc), computed as $M_\mathrm{dyn}= 5.0 \ \sigma _\mathrm{e}^2 r_\mathrm{e}/ G$, are lower than their stellar masses M⋆. In a previous study from our group, the discrepancy is interpreted as a breakdown of the assumption of homology that underlie the Mdyn determinations. Here, we present new spectroscopy of six redshift z ≈ 1.0 massive compact ellipticals from the Extended Groth Strip, obtained with the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias. We obtain velocity dispersions in the range 161–340 km s−1. As found by previous studies of massive compact galaxies, our velocity dispersions are lower than the virial expectation, and all of our galaxies show Mdyn < M⋆ (assuming a Salpeter initial mass function). Adding data from the literature, we build a sample covering a range of stellar masses and compactness in a narrow redshift range z ≈ 1.0. This allows us to exclude systematic effects on the data and evolutionary effects on the galaxy population, which could have affected previous studies. We confirm that mass discrepancy scales with galaxy compactness. We use the stellar mass plane (M⋆, σe, re) populated by our sample to constrain a generic evolution mechanism. We find that the simulations of the growth of massive ellipticals due to mergers agree with our constraints and discard the assumption of homology.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    ABSTRACT: We present Keck-I MOSFIRE spectroscopy in the Y and H bands of GDN-8231, a massive, compact, star-forming galaxy (SFG) at a redshift $z\sim1.7$. Its spectrum reveals both H$_{\alpha}$ and [NII] emission lines and strong Balmer absorption lines. The H$_{\alpha}$ and Spitzer MIPS 24 $\mu$m fluxes are both weak, thus indicating a low star formation rate of SFR $\lesssim5-10$ M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$. This, added to a relatively young age of $\sim700$ Myr measured from the absorption lines, provides the first direct evidence for a distant galaxy being caught in the act of rapidly shutting down its star formation. Such quenching allows GDN-8231 to become a compact, quiescent galaxy, similar to 3 other galaxies in our sample, by $z\sim1.5$. Moreover, the color profile of GDN-8231 shows a bluer center, consistent with the predictions of recent simulations for an early phase of inside-out quenching. Its line-of-sight velocity dispersion for the gas, $\sigma^{\rm{gas}}_{\!_{\rm LOS}}=127\pm32$ km s$^{-1}$, is nearly 40% smaller than that of its stars, $\sigma^{\star}_{\!_{\rm LOS}}=215\pm35$ km s$^{-1}$. High-resolution hydro-simulations of galaxies explain such apparently colder gas kinematics of up to a factor of $\sim1.5$ with rotating disks being viewed at different inclinations and/or centrally concentrated star-forming regions. A clear prediction is that their compact, quiescent descendants preserve some remnant rotation from their star-forming progenitors.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015
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    ABSTRACT: We present new measurements of the evolution of the X-ray luminosity functions (XLFs) of unabsorbed and absorbed active galactic nuclei (AGNs) out to z ∼ 5. We construct samples containing 2957 sources detected at hard (2–7 keV) X-ray energies and 4351 sources detected at soft (0.5–2 keV) energies from a compilation of Chandra surveys supplemented by wide-area surveys from ASCA and ROSAT. We consider the hard and soft X-ray samples separately and find that the XLF based on either (initially neglecting absorption effects) is best described by a new flexible model parametrization where the break luminosity, normalization, and faint-end slope all evolve with redshift. We then incorporate absorption effects, separately modelling the evolution of the XLFs of unabsorbed (20 < log NH < 22) and absorbed (22 < log NH < 24) AGNs, seeking a model that can reconcile both the hard- and soft-band samples. We find that the absorbed AGN XLF has a lower break luminosity, a higher normalization, and a steeper faint-end slope than the unabsorbed AGN XLF out to z ∼ 2. Hence, absorbed AGNs dominate at low luminosities, with the absorbed fraction falling rapidly as luminosity increases. Both XLFs undergo strong luminosity evolution which shifts the transition in the absorbed fraction to higher luminosities at higher redshifts. The evolution in the shape of the total XLF is primarily driven by the changing mix of unabsorbed and absorbed populations.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    ABSTRACT: We present the analysis of the integrated spectral energy distribution (SED) from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared and H$\alpha$ of a sample of 29 local systems and individual galaxies with infrared (IR) luminosities between 10^11 Lsun and 10^11.8 Lsun. We have combined new narrow-band H$\alpha$+[NII] and broad-band g, r optical imaging taken with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), with archival GALEX, 2MASS, Spitzer, and Herschel data. The SEDs (photometry and integrated H$\alpha$ flux) have been fitted with a modified version of the MAGPHYS code using stellar population synthesis models for the UV-near-IR range and thermal emission models for the IR emission taking into account the energy balance between the absorbed and re-emitted radiation. From the SED fits we derive the star-formation histories (SFH) of these galaxies. For nearly half of them the star-formation rate appears to be approximately constant during the last few Gyrs. In the other half, the current star-formation rate seems to be enhanced by a factor of 3-20 with respect to that occured ~1 Gyr ago. Objects with constant SFH tend to be more massive than starbursts and they are compatible with the expected properties of a main-sequence (M-S) galaxy. Likewise, the derived SFHs show that all our objects were M-S galaxies ~1 Gyr ago with stellar masses between 10^10.1 and 10^11.5 Msun. We also derived from our fits the average extinction (A_v=0.6-3 mag) and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) luminosity to L(IR) ratio (0.03-0.16). We combined the A_v with the total IR and H$\alpha$ luminosities into a diagram which can be used to identify objects with rapidly changing (increasing or decreasing) SFR during the last 100 Myr.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015 · Astronomy and Astrophysics
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    ABSTRACT: We explore the stellar initial mass function (IMF) of a sample of 49 massive quiescent galaxies (MQGs) at 0.9?< z <?1.5. We base our analysis on intermediate resolution spectro-photometric data in the GOODS-N field taken in the near-infrared and optical with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 G141 grism and the Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources. To constrain the slope of the IMF, we have measured the TiO2 spectral feature, whose strength depends strongly on the content of low-mass stars, as well as on stellar age. Using ultraviolet to near-infrared individual and stacked spectral energy distributions, we have independently estimated the stellar ages of our galaxies. Knowing the age of the stellar population, we interpret the strong differences in the TiO2 feature as an IMF variation. In particular, for the heaviest z ~?1 MQGs (M >?1011M ?), we find an average age of 1.7???0.3?Gyr and a bottom-heavy IMF (?b = 3.2???0.2). Lighter MQGs (2?×?1010 < M <?1011M ?) at the same redshift are younger on average (1.0???0.2?Gyr) and present a shallower IMF slope (). Our results are in good agreement with the findings about the IMF slope in early-type galaxies of similar mass in the present-day universe. This suggests that the IMF, a key characteristic of the stellar populations in galaxies, is bottom-heavier for more massive galaxies and has remained unchanged in the last ~8?Gyr.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · The Astrophysical Journal Letters
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    ABSTRACT: We present a study of galaxies showing mid-infrared variability in data taken in the deepest Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm surveys in the Great Observatory Origins Deep Survey South field. We divide the data set in epochs and subepochs to study the long-term (months–years) and the short-term (days) variability. We use a χ2-statistics method to select active galactic nucleus (AGN) candidates with a probability ≤1 per cent that the observed variability is due to statistical errors alone. We find 39 (1.7 per cent of the parent sample) sources that show long-term variability and 55 (2.2 per cent of the parent sample) showing short-term variability. That is, 0.03 sources × arcmin−2 for both, long-term and short-term variable sources. After removing the expected number of false positives inherent to the method, the estimated percentages are 1.0 and 1.4 per cent of the parent sample for the long term and short term, respectively. We compare our candidates with AGN selected in the X-ray and radio bands, and AGN candidates selected by their IR emission. Approximately, 50 per cent of the MIPS (Multiband Imaging Photometer for Spitzer) 24 μm variable sources would be identified as AGN with these other methods. Therefore, MIPS 24 μm variability is a new method to identify AGN candidates, possibly dust obscured and low-luminosity AGN, that might be missed by other methods. However, the contribution of the MIPS 24 μm variable identified AGN to the general AGN population is small (≤13 per cent) in GOODS-South.
    Preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    ABSTRACT: MEGARA (Multi-Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is the future intermediate-resolution optical Integral-Field Unit (IFU) and Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) of the 10.4m GTC telescope. The instrument can be used to observe either a contiguous (100% filling factor) field-of-view of 12.5×11.3 arcsec^{2} or 92 objects anywhere in a 3.5×3.5 arcmin^{2} field patrolled by robotic actuactors attached to optical-fiber minibundles, respectively in its IFU and MOS modes. The MEGARA Consortium is led by the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM, Spain) and also includes the Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, óptica y Electrónica (INAOE, Mexico), the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA-CSIC, Spain) and the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM, Spain). The instrument passed its Critical Design Review (CDR) on late 2014 and is currently in construction phase with a planned date for the start of operations at GTC on early 2017. In this paper we summarize the main characteristics of the instrument and the status of the project.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Sep 2014
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    ABSTRACT: Lenticular galaxies (S0s) are more likely to host antitruncated (Type-III) stellar discs than galaxies of later Hubble types. Major mergers are popularly considered too violent mechanisms to form these breaks. We have investigated whether major mergers can result into S0-like remnants with realistic antitruncated stellar discs or not. We have analysed 67 relaxed S0 and E/S0 remnants resulting from dissipative N-body simulations of major mergers from the GalMer database. We have simulated realistic R-band surface brightness profiles of the remnants to identify those with antitruncated stellar discs. Their inner and outer discs and the breaks are quantitatively characterized to compare with real data. Nearly 70% of our S0-like remnants are antitruncated, meaning that major mergers that result in S0s have a high probability of producing Type-III stellar discs. Our remnants lie on top of the extrapolations of the observational trends (towards brighter magnitudes and higher break radii) in several photometric diagrams. In scale-free photometric diagrams, simulations and observations overlap and the remnants reproduce the observational trends, so the physical mechanism after antitruncations is highly scalable. We have found novel photometric scaling relations between the characteristic parameters of the antitruncations in real S0s, which are also reproduced by our simulations. The trends in all the photometric planes can be derived from three basic scaling relations that real and simulated Type-III S0s fulfill: h_i \prop R_brkIII, h_o \prop R_brkIII, and mu_brkIII \prop R_brkIII, where h_i and h_o are the scalelenghts of the inner and outer discs, and mu_brkIII and R_brkIII are the surface brightness and radius of the breaks. Mayor mergers provide a feasible mechanism to form realistic antitruncated S0 galaxies (abridged).
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014 · Astronomy and Astrophysics
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    ABSTRACT: We combine multi-wavelength data in the AEGIS-XD and C-COSMOS surveys to measure the typical dark matter halo mass of X-ray selected active galactic nuclei (AGN) [LX(2–10 keV) > 1042 erg s− 1] in comparison with far-infrared selected star-forming galaxies detected in the Herschel/PEP survey (PACS Evolutionary Probe; LIR > 1011 L⊙) and quiescent systems at z ≈ 1. We develop a novel method to measure the clustering of extragalactic populations that uses photometric redshift probability distribution functions in addition to any spectroscopy. This is advantageous in that all sources in the sample are used in the clustering analysis, not just the subset with secure spectroscopy. The method works best for large samples. The loss of accuracy because of the lack of spectroscopy is balanced by increasing the number of sources used to measure the clustering. We find that X-ray AGN, far-infrared selected star-forming galaxies and passive systems in the redshift interval 0.6 < z < 1.4 are found in haloes of similar mass, log MDMH/(M⊙ h−1) ≈ 13.0. We argue that this is because the galaxies in all three samples (AGN, star-forming, passive) have similar stellar mass distributions, approximated by the J-band luminosity. Therefore, all galaxies that can potentially host X-ray AGN, because they have stellar masses in the appropriate range, live in dark matter haloes of log MDMH/(M⊙ h−1) ≈ 13.0 independent of their star formation rates. This suggests that the stellar mass of X-ray AGN hosts is driving the observed clustering properties of this population. We also speculate that trends between AGN properties (e.g. luminosity, level of obscuration) and large-scale environment may be related to differences in the stellar mass of the host galaxies.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    ABSTRACT: We are undertaking a search for high-redshift low-luminosity Lyman Alpha sources in the SHARDS (Survey for High-z Absorption Red and Dead Sources) survey. Among the pre-selected Lyman Alpha sources two candidates were spotted, located 3.19 arcsec apart, and tentatively at the same redshift. Here, we report on the spectroscopic confirmation with Gran Telescopio Canarias of the Lyman Alpha emission from this pair of galaxies at a confirmed spectroscopic redshifts of z=5.07. Furthermore, one of the sources is interacting/merging with another close companion that looks distorted. Based on the analysis of the spectroscopy and additional photometric data, we infer that most of the stellar mass of these objects was assembled in a burst of star formation 100 Myr ago. A more recent burst (2 Myr old) is necessary to account for the measured Lyman Alpha flux. We claim that these two galaxies are good examples of Lyman Alpha sources undergoing episodic star formation. Besides, these sources very likely constitute a group of interacting Lyman Alpha emitters (LAEs).
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Letters

Publication Stats

8k Citations
804.82 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 1999-2015
    • Complutense University of Madrid
      • Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2008
    • Space Telescope Science Institute
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
    • Instituto de Estructura de la Materia
      Madrid, Madrid, Spain
  • 2004-2008
    • The University of Arizona
      • Department of Astronomy
      Tucson, Arizona, United States
  • 2006
    • California Institute of Technology
      • Spitzer Science Center
      Pasadena, California, United States