M. Takashina

Osaka University, Suika, Ōsaka, Japan

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Publications (54)128.44 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The aim of the this study was to validate the use of an average intensity projection (AIP) for volumetric-modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiation therapy (VMAT–SBRT) planning for a moving lung tumor located near the diaphragm. VMAT–SBRT plans were created using AIPs reconstructed from 10 phases of 4DCT images that were acquired with a target phantom moving with amplitudes of 5, 10, 20 and 30 mm. To generate a 4D dose distribution, the static dose for each phase was recalculated and the doses were accumulated by using the phantom position known for each phase. For 10 patients with lung tumors, a deformable registration was used to generate 4D dose distributions. Doses to the target volume obtained from the AIP plan and the 4D plan were compared, as were the doses obtained from each plan to the organs at risk (OARs). In both phantom and clinical study, dose discrepancies for all parameters of the dose volume (Dmin, D99, Dmax, D1 and Dmean) to the target were <3%. The discrepancies of Dmax for spinal cord, esophagus and heart were <1 Gy, and the discrepancy of V20 for lung tissue was <1%. However, for OARs with large respiratory motion, the discrepancy of the Dmax was as much as 9.6 Gy for liver and 5.7 Gy for stomach. Thus, AIP is clinically acceptable as a planning CT image for predicting 4D dose, but doses to the OARs with large respiratory motion were underestimated with the AIP approach.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Radiation Research
  • M Yamanaka · M Takashina · K Kurosu · V Moskvin · I Das · M Koizumi
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    ABSTRACT: In this study we present Monte Carlo based evaluation of the shielding effect for secondary neutrons from patient collimator, and secondary photons emitted in the process of neutron shielding by combination of moderator and boron-10 placed around patient collimator. The PHITS Monte Carlo Simulation radiation transport code was used to simulate the proton beam (Ep = 64 to 93 MeV) from a proton therapy facility. In this study, moderators (water, polyethylene and paraffin) and boron (pure (1)⁰B) were placed around patient collimator in this order. The rate of moderator and boron thicknesses was changed fixing the total thickness at 3cm. The secondary neutron and photons doses were evaluated as the ambient dose equivalent per absorbed dose [H*(10)/D]. The secondary neutrons are shielded more effectively by combination moderators and boron. The most effective combination of shielding neutrons is the polyethylene of 2.4 cm thick and the boron of 0.6 cm thick and the maximum reduction rate is 47.3 %. The H*(10)/D of secondary photons in the control case is less than that of neutrons by two orders of magnitude and the maximum increase of secondary photons is 1.0 µSv/Gy with the polyethylene of 2.8 cm thick and the boron of 0.2 cm thick. The combination of moderators and boron is beneficial for shielding secondary neutrons. Both the secondary photons of control and those emitted in the shielding neutrons are very lower than the secondary neutrons and photon has low RBE in comparison with neutron. Therefore the secondary photons can be ignored in the shielding neutrons.This work was supported by JSPS Core-to-Core Program (No.23003). This work was supported by JSPS Core-to-Core Program (No.23003).
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Medical Physics
  • Y Otani · I Sumida · M Yagi · H Mizuno · M Takashina · M Koizumi · K Ogawa
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    ABSTRACT: Brachytherapy has multiple manual procedures which are prone to human error, especially during the connection process of the treatment device to applicator. This is when considerable attention is required. In this study, we propose a new connection verification device concept. The system is composed of a ring magnet (anisotropic ferrite : magfine Inc), hole device (A1324LUA-T : Allegro MicroSystems Phil Inc) and an in-house check cable, which is made from magnetic material (Figure1). The magnetic field distribution is affected by the check cable position and any magnetic field variation is detected by the hole device. This system frequency is 20Hz and the average of 4 signals was used as hole device value to reduce noise. The value of the hole device is altered, depending on the location of the check cable. The resolution of the check cable position is 5mm and 10mm, around a 10mm region from the hole device and over 10mm, respectively. There was a reduction in sensitivity of the hole device, in our test, which was linked to the distance of the hole device from the check cable. We demonstrated a new concept of connection verification in a brachytherapy. This system has the possibility to detect an incorrect connection. Moreover, the system is capable of self-optimization, such as determining the number of hole device and the magnet strength.Acknowledgement:This work was supported by JSPS Core -to-Core program Number 23003 and KAKENHI Grant Number 26860401. This work was supported by JSPS Core-to-Core program Number 23003 and KAKENHI Grant Number 26860401.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Medical Physics
  • H Mizuno · I Sumida · Y Otani · M Yagi · M Takashina · O Suzuki · Y Yoshioka · M Koizumi · K Ogawa
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    ABSTRACT: Hypo-fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is nowadays one of the treatment strategies for prostate cancer. There are few reports on planning study of prostate cancer by CyberKnife with respect to the urethral dose because of the invisibility in CT. We have investigated a planning method using fixed collimators with considering dose homogeneity, conformity and urethral dose. Radiotherapy treatment planning of prostate cancer were under a clinical trial approved by the institutional review board. The prescription dose of 35 Gy were delivered to the PTV in five fractions with the urethral catheter. Urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and catheter, which was inserted before treatment planning CT and released after the treatment. All plans agreed to the criteria as shown in table 1, and the following constraints were recommended as well: the prescribed iso-dose line should be from 70% to 90%; the total MU should be below 50,000 MU; the minimum MU per beam should be larger than 15 MU; the estimated delivery time (excluding patient setup time) by Multiplan with image time interval of 60 s should be less than 35 min. Collimator size and position were decided as shown in figure 1. Fixed collimator of 15 mm was positioned around urethra and PTV for avoiding high dose of urethra and achieving conformity, and fixed collimator of 30 or 40 were positioned around PTV for achieving dose homogeneity. With this method, all constraints were achieved. (Table 1, Figure 2) Max dose of urethra was ranging from 103.9% to 114.2%, because urethra position was identified by pretreatment CT and urethral catheter. Hypo-fractionated SBRT with IMRT utilizing urethral catheter could be a promising new treatment option for prostate cancer. This work was supported by JSPS Core-to-Core program Number 23003.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Medical Physics
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    ABSTRACT: To assess optimal treatment planning approach of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy for lung Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (VMAT-SBRT). Subjects were 10 patients with lung cancer who had undergone 4DCT. The internal target volume (ITV) volume ranged from 2.6 to 16.5cm(3) and the tumor motion ranged from 0 to 2cm. From 4DCT, which was binned into 10 respiratory phases, 4 image data sets were created; maximum intensity projection (MIP), average intensity projection (AIP), AIP with the ITV replaced by 0HU (RITV-AIP) and RITV-AIP with the planning target volume (PTV) minus the internal target volume was set to -200 HU (HR-AIP). VMAT-SBRT plans were generated on each image set for a patient. 48Gy was prescribed to 95% of PTV. The plans were recalculated on all phase images of 4DCT and the dose distributions were accumulated using a deformable image registration software MIM Maestro™ as the 4D calculated dose to the gross tumor volume (GTV). The planned dose to the ITV and 4D calculated dose to the GTV were compared. In AIP plan, 10 patients average of all dose parameters (D1%, D_mean, and D99%) discrepancy were 1Gy or smaller. MIP and RITV-AIP plans resulted in having common tendency and larger discrepancy than AIP plan. The 4D dose was lower than the planned dose, and 10 patients average of all dose parameters discrepancy were in range 1.3 to 2.6Gy. HR-AIP plan had the largest discrepancy in our trials. 4D calculated D1%, D_mean, and D99% were resulted in 3.0, 4.1, and 6.1Gy lower than the expected in plan, respectively. For all patients, the dose parameters expected in AIP plan approximated to 4D calculated. Using AIP image set seems optimal treatment planning approach of VMAT-SBRT for a mobile tumor. Funding Support: This work was supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Core-to-Core program (No. 23003).
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Medical Physics
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    ABSTRACT: The differential cross sections of the 16O(p,d) reaction populating the ground state and several low-lying excited states in 15O were measured using 198-, 295- and 392-MeV proton beams at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, to study the effect of the tensor interactions in 16O. Dividing the cross sections for each excited state by the one for the ground state and comparing the ratios over a wide range of momentum transfer, we found a marked enhancement of the ratio for the positive-parity state(s). The observation is consistent with large components of high-momentum neutrons in the ground-state configurations of 16O due possibly to the tensor interactions.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · Journal of Physics Conference Series
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    ABSTRACT: Although three general-purpose Monte Carlo (MC) simulation tools: Geant4, FLUKA and PHITS have been used extensively, differences in calculation results have been reported. The major causes are the implementation of the physical model, preset value of the ionization potential or definition of the maximum step size. In order to achieve artifact free MC simulation, an optimized parameters list for each simulation system is required. Several authors have already proposed the optimized lists, but those studies were performed with a simple system such as only a water phantom. Since particle beams have a transport, interaction and electromagnetic processes during beam delivery, establishment of an optimized parameters-list for whole beam delivery system is therefore of major importance. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimized parameters list for GATE and PHITS using proton treatment nozzle computational model. The simulation was performed with the broad scanning proton beam. The influences of the customizing parameters on the percentage depth dose (PDD) profile and the proton range were investigated by comparison with the result of FLUKA, and then the optimal parameters were determined. The PDD profile and the proton range obtained from our optimized parameters list showed different characteristics from the results obtained with simple system. This led to the conclusion that the physical model, particle transport mechanics and different geometry-based descriptions need accurate customization in planning computational experiments for artifact-free MC simulation.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2014 · Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms
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    ABSTRACT: There are 2 methods commonly used for patient positioning in the anterior-posterior (A-P) direction: one is the skin mark patient setup method (SMPS) and the other is the couch height-based patient setup method (CHPS). This study compared the setup accuracy of these 2 methods for abdominal radiation therapy. The enrollment for this study comprised 23 patients with pancreatic cancer. For treatments (539 sessions), patients were set up by using isocenter skin marks and thereafter treatment couch was shifted so that the distance between the isocenter and the upper side of the treatment couch was equal to that indicated on the computed tomographic (CT) image. Setup deviation in the A-P direction for CHPS was measured by matching the spine of the digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) of a lateral beam at simulation with that of the corresponding time-integrated electronic portal image. For SMPS with no correction (SMPS/NC), setup deviation was calculated based on the couch-level difference between SMPS and CHPS. SMPS/NC was corrected using 2 off-line correction protocols: no action level (SMPS/NAL) and extended NAL (SMPS/eNAL) protocols. Margins to compensate for deviations were calculated using the Stroom formula. A-P deviation > 5mm was observed in 17% of SMPS/NC, 4% of SMPS/NAL, and 4% of SMPS/eNAL sessions but only in one CHPS session. For SMPS/NC, 7 patients (30%) showed deviations at an increasing rate of > 0.1mm/fraction, but for CHPS, no such trend was observed. The standard deviations (SDs) of systematic error (Σ) were 2.6, 1.4, 0.6, and 0.8mm and the root mean squares of random error (σ) were 2.1, 2.6, 2.7, and 0.9mm for SMPS/NC, SMPS/NAL, SMPS/eNAL, and CHPS, respectively. Margins to compensate for the deviations were wide for SMPS/NC (6.7mm), smaller for SMPS/NAL (4.6mm) and SMPS/eNAL (3.1mm), and smallest for CHPS (2.2mm). Achieving better setup with smaller margins, CHPS appears to be a reproducible method for abdominal patient setup.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2014 · International journal of radiation oncology, biology, physics
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    ABSTRACT: Technical developments in radiotherapy (RT) have created a need for systematic quality assurance (QA) to ensure that clinical institutions deliver prescribed radiation doses consistent with the requirements of clinical protocols. For QA, an ideal dose verification system should be independent of the treatment-planning system (TPS). This paper describes the development and reproducibility evaluation of a Monte Carlo (MC)-based standard LINAC model as a preliminary requirement for independent verification of dose distributions. The BEAMnrc MC code is used for characterization of the 6-, 10- and 15-MV photon beams for a wide range of field sizes. The modeling of the LINAC head components is based on the specifications provided by the manufacturer. MC dose distributions are tuned to match Varian Golden Beam Data (GBD). For reproducibility evaluation, calculated beam data is compared with beam data measured at individual institutions. For all energies and field sizes, the MC and GBD agreed to within 1.0% for percentage depth doses (PDDs), 1.5% for beam profiles and 1.2% for total scatter factors (Scps.). Reproducibility evaluation showed that the maximum average local differences were 1.3% and 2.5% for PDDs and beam profiles, respectively. MC and institutions' mean Scps agreed to within 2.0%. An MC-based standard LINAC model developed to independently verify dose distributions for QA of multi-institutional clinical trials and routine clinical practice has proven to be highly accurate and reproducible and can thus help ensure that prescribed doses delivered are consistent with the requirements of clinical protocols.
    Preview · Article · Jun 2014 · Journal of Radiation Research
  • N. Wakai · P. Zhou · I. Das · M. Takashina · M. Koizumi · K. Ogawa · T. Teshima · N. Matsuura

    No preview · Article · Oct 2013 · International Journal of Radiation OncologyBiologyPhysics
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    ABSTRACT: We have measured the 16O(p, d) reaction using 198-, 295- and 392-MeV proton beams to search for a direct evidence on an effect of the tensor interactions in light nucleus. Differential cross sections of the one-neutron transfer reaction populating the ground states and several low-lying excited states in 15O were measured. Comparing the ratios of the cross sections for each excited state to the one for the ground state over a wide range of momentum transfer, we found a marked enhancement of the ratio for the positive-parity state(s). The observation is consistent with large components of high-momentum neutrons in the initial ground-state configurations due to the tensor interactions.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2013 · Physics Letters B
  • C‐W Cheng · M Takashina · M Suga · I. J. Das · V Moskvin
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: RBE in proton beam is variable and it is expected that the values are different at Bragg peak. This is investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. The objective is to determine the physical quantities contributing to the spatial variation of RBE in proton beam. Methods: The Monte Carlo codes PHITS and FLUKA are used in this study. A mono‐energetic unmodulated proton beam is incident on a water phantom. The average proton energy along the proton beam path, the proton flux, Φ(#protons/cm2/incident proton) and the linear energy transfer, LET (keV/μm) integrated over the energy range 0‐Ep,max are computed at selected depths from d=0 to 1cm beyond the Bragg peak for incident proton energies 50–250 MeV. The quantity LET*Φ /ρ which is a direct measure of energy absorbed/unit mass at each point of the proton beam path is also determined. Results: The proton energies at the BP are 4, 4, 12, 19 and 25 MeV for incident proton energies of 50, 100, 150, 200 and 250 MeV respectively. As the proton energy decreases with depth, the LET increases, while the proton flux decreases due to the broadening of the proton spectrum with depth. Thus the product, LET*Φ attains a maximum somewhere on the distal edge of the BP (or the SOBP). Lower energy protons have a higher LET*F at the distal edge than that higher energy beams. Conclusion: RBE is related to the relative dose (energy absorbed/unit mass) to a reference radiation for the same biological endpoint. The variation of LET*Φ indirectly shows that the increase in RBE at the distal edge is due to the two competing factors in play, the LET and the proton flux as a function of depth. Strictly speaking, secondary electrons contribute to the2 LET and flux, and will affect the RBE, to a small extent.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2013 · Medical Physics
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: The Agility multileaf collimator (MLC) mounted on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator for 6 MV was modeled for IMRT and VMAT calculations using the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code and verified versus measurements. Methods: To describe the Agility MLC in BEAMnrc, the available Component Module code was modified to include its characteristics; 5 mm leaf width, flat leaf sides with a focus point shifted from the radiation source. The MLC model was verified by comparison of the calculated interleaf leakage and tongue‐and‐groove effect for a closed MLC field and an irregular field to measurements with EBT2 film in a solid water phantom and diode measurements in a water phantom, respectively. We have developed a time dependent phase space data (PSD), which include a parameter based on MU index. Because leaf, jaw, collimator and gantry positions of each segment are controlled by MU index, this PSD enabled to simulate dynamic motions by interpolating positions between each segment. IMRT and VMAT calculations were compared with film measurements in a solid water phantom to validate the accuracy of the overall MLC model. MC statistical uncertainty was below 2% for all simulations. Results: We found a good agreement with our measurements on interleaf leakage. Agreement between mean calculated and measured leaf transmissions with fully opened jaws normalized to the center of a 10×10 cm2 field at the same depth was within 0.1%. Discrepancy between MC calculation and measurement for the irregular field was below 2%/2 mm. The gamma analysis of the comparison of MC and EBT2 film measurements in IMRT and VMAT fields showed 99.1%, 99.5% pass rates with 3%/3 mm criteria, respectively. Conclusion: The Agility MLC produced by Elekta could be accurately MC modeled with an adaptation in BEAMnrc. The MC model proved to be applicable for IMRT and VMAT calculations. Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Core‐to‐Core Program
    No preview · Article · Jun 2013 · Medical Physics
  • N Wakai · H Zhang · P Zhou · I Das · M Takashina · M Koizumi · K Ogawa · T Teshima · N Matsuura
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: High‐Z materials are often encountered in cancer patients undergoing radiation treatment. Due to electron transport and saturation of CT number versus density, it is difficult for treatment planning system (TPS) to take account of dose perturbation. The purpose of this study is to measure dose perturbations and to verify dose calculation accuracy by a TPS with high‐Z. Methods: A phantom was created with high‐Z placed at 1.5 cm depth. Dose measurements were made using plane‐parallel ion chamber and EBT2 film. The measurement was carried out for a 6MV photon for square field sizes of 3?3, 5?5 and 10?10 cm2 for various high‐Z and variable thickness (Pb 0.1 mm, 0.5 mm, Sn 0.1 mm, 0.5 mm and Cu 0.5 mm) Dose calculation was performed using AAA algorithm with 1mm calculation grid. Forward dose perturbation factor (FDPF) was defined as the ratio of the dose with high‐Z to the dose without high‐Z. Results: Ion chamber measurement shows that FDPF increase and reaches a value of to 1.0, as thickness and atomic number of high‐Z decreases. At 1.5 cm or more from high‐Z, the difference of FDPF between ion chamber and TPS was within 2 %. At 0, 0.2 and 0.5 cm from high‐Z, ion chamber measurement were lower than TPS by an average of 12, 8 and 4 %, respectively. The measured and calculated difference increases, as thickness and atomic number of high‐Z increases. There was no field size dependency except surface of high‐Z. The difference of FDPF between ion chamber and EBT2 film was up to 4 %. Conclusion: TPS calculation overestimate doses near high‐Z interfaces. The difference of FDPF between ion chamber and TPS decreases, as the distance from high‐Z increase. This work was supported by a grant from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Core‐to‐Core Program (GrantNo. 23003).
    No preview · Article · Jun 2013 · Medical Physics
  • S. Tsudou · H. Takegawa · M. Takashina · H. Numasaki · T. Teshima

    No preview · Article · Nov 2012 · International Journal of Radiation OncologyBiologyPhysics
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    V Moskvin · C Cheng · V Anferov · D Nichiporov · Q Zhao · M Takashina · R Parola · I Das
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose: Charged particle therapy, especially proton therapy is a growing treatment modality worldwide. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation of the interactions of proton beam with equipment, devices and patient is a highly efficient tool that can substitute measurements for complex and unrealistic experiments. The purpose of this study is to design a MC model of a treatment nozzle to characterize the proton scanning beam and commissioning the model for the Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center (IUHPTC. Methods: The general purpose Monte Carlo code FLUKA was used for simulation of the proton beam passage through the elements of the treatment nozzle design. The geometry of the nozzle was extracted from the design blueprints. The initial parameters for beam simulation were determined from calculations of beam optics design to derive a semi-empirical model to describe the initial parameters of the beam entering the nozzle. The lateral fluence and energy distribution of the beam entering the nozzle is defined as a function of the requested range. The uniform scanning model at the IUHPTC is implemented. The results of simulation with the beam and nozzle model are compared and verified with measurements. Results: The lateral particle distribution and energy spectra of the proton beam entering the nozzle were compared with measurements in the interval of energies from 70 MeV to 204.8 MeV. The accuracy of the description of the proton beam by MC simulation is better than 2% compared with measurements, providing confidence for complex simulation in phantom and patient dosimetry with the MC simulated nozzle and the uniform scanning proton beam. Conclusions: The treatment nozzle and beam model was accurately implemented in the FLUKA Monte Carlo code and suitable for the research purpose to simulate the scanning beam at IUHPTC.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2012 · Medical Physics
  • T. Furumoto · W. Horiuchi · M. Takashina · Y. Yamamoto · Y. Sakuragi

    No preview · Article · Jun 2012 · Physical Review C
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    ABSTRACT: We have measured 16O(p,d) reaction using 198-, 295- and 392-MeV proton beams to search for a direct evidence on the effect of the tensor interactions in light nucleus. Differential cross sections of the one-neutron transfer reactions populating the ground states and several low-lying excited states in 15O were measured. Comparing the ratios of the cross sections for each excited state to the one for the ground state over a wide range of momentum transfer, we found a marked enhancement for the positive-parity state(s). The observation indicates large components of high-momentum neutrons in the initial ground-state configurations, due possibly to the tensor interactions.
    Full-text · Article · May 2012 · The European Physical Journal Conferences
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    T. Furumoto · W. Horiuchi · M. Takashina · Y. Yamamoto · Y. Sakuragi
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    ABSTRACT: We present a new global optical potential (GOP) for nucleus-nucleus systems, including neutron-rich and proton-rich isotopes, in the energy range of $50 \sim 400$ MeV/u. The GOP is derived from the microscopic folding model with the complex $G$-matrix interaction CEG07 and the global density presented by S{\~ a}o Paulo group. The folding model well accounts for realistic complex optical potentials of nucleus-nucleus systems and reproduces the existing elastic scattering data for stable heavy-ion projectiles at incident energies above 50 MeV/u. We then calculate the folding-model potentials (FMPs) for projectiles of even-even isotopes, $^{8-22}$C, $^{12-24}$O, $^{16-38}$Ne, $^{20-40}$Mg, $^{22-48}$Si, $^{26-52}$S, $^{30-62}$Ar, and $^{34-70}$Ca, scattered by stable target nuclei of $^{12}$C, $^{16}$O, $^{28}$Si, $^{40}$Ca $^{58}$Ni, $^{90}$Zr, $^{120}$Sn, and $^{208}$Pb at the incident energy of 50, 60, 70, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160, 180, 200, 250, 300, 350, and 400 MeV/u. The calculated FMP is represented, with a sufficient accuracy, by a linear combination of 10-range Gaussian functions. The expansion coefficients depend on the incident energy, the projectile and target mass numbers and the projectile atomic number, while the range parameters are taken to depend only on the projectile and target mass numbers. The adequate mass region of the present GOP by the global density is inspected in comparison with FMP by realistic density. The full set of the range parameters and the coefficients for all the projectile-target combinations at each incident energy are provided on a permanent open-access website together with a Fortran program for calculating the microscopic-basis GOP (MGOP) for a desired projectile nucleus by the spline interpolation over the incident energy and the target mass number.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2012 · Physical Review C
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    ABSTRACT: We investigate the α+d elastic scattering and the radiative capture reaction of 2H(α, γ)6Li based on the α + p + n three-body model. The α+d scattering states are described by using the complex-scaled solutions of the Lippmann-Schwinger equation. We calculate the elastic phase shifts for the α+d scattering and the radiative capture cross section of 6Li. We evaluate the contributions of the α + p + n structures in those observables. It is found that in the α+d scattering process, the deuteron breakup and the rearrangement to the 5He + p and 5Li + n channels play prominent roles in reproducing the observed phase shifts and radiative capture cross section.
    No preview · Article · Dec 2011 · Physical Review C

Publication Stats

278 Citations
128.44 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2009-2015
    • Osaka University
      • • Graduate School of Medicine
      • • Department of Medical Physics and Engineering
      • • Research Center for Nuclear Physics
      Suika, Ōsaka, Japan
  • 2003-2014
    • Osaka City University
      • Department of Physics
      Ōsaka, Ōsaka, Japan
  • 2012
    • Hokkaido University
      • Division of Physics
      Sapporo, Hokkaidō, Japan
  • 2005-2010
    • RIKEN
      Вако, Saitama, Japan
  • 2006-2008
    • Kyoto University
      • Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics
      Kioto, Kyoto, Japan