J. Larsson

KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Tukholma, Stockholm, Sweden

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Publications (41)227.55 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern the following scientific tasks: investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons. Also the GAMMA- 400 instrument provides the possibility for protons and nuclei measurements up to knee. But the main goal for the GAMMA-400 mission is to perform a sensitive search for signatures of dark matter particles in high-energy gamma-ray emission. To fulfill these measurements the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics in comparison with previous and present experiments. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolution for gamma-rays above 10 GeV. The GAMMA-400 experiment will be installed onboard of the Navigator space platform, manufactured by the NPO Lavochkin Association. The expected orbit will be a highly elliptical orbit (with apogee 300.000 km and perigee 500 km) with 7 days orbital period. An important profit of such an orbit is the fact that the full sky coverage will always be available for gamma ray astronomy.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of Physics Conference Series
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    ABSTRACT: The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope with excellent angular and energy resolutions is designed to search for signatures of dark matter in the fluxes of gamma-ray emission and electrons + positrons. Precision investigations of gamma-ray emission from Galactic Center, Crab, Vela, Cygnus, Geminga, and other regions will be performed, as well as diffuse gamma-ray emission, along with measurements of high-energy electron + positron and nuclei fluxes. Furthermore, it will study gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun during periods of solar activity. The GAMMA-400 energy range is expected to be from ~20 MeV up to TeV energies for gamma rays, up to 10 TeV for electrons + positrons, and up to 1015 eV for cosmic-ray nuclei. For 100-GeV gamma rays, the GAMMA-400 angular resolution is ~0.01° and energy resolution is ~1%; the proton rejection factor is ~5x105. GAMMA-400 will be installed onboard the Russian space observatory.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016 · Journal of Physics Conference Series
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    ABSTRACT: GAMMA-400 γ-ray telescope is designed to measure fluxes of γ-rays and the electron–positron cosmic ray component possibly generated in annihilation or decay of dark matter particles; to search for and study in detail discrete γ-ray sources, to examine the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse γ-rays, to study γ-ray bursts and γ-rays from the active Sun. GAMMA-400 consists of plastic scintillation anticoincidence top and lateral detectors, converter-tracker, plastic scintillation detectors for the time-of-flight system (TOF), two-part calorimeter (CC1 and CC2), plastic scintillation lateral detectors of calorimeter, plastic scintillation detectors of calorimeter, and neutron detector. The converter-tracker consists of 13 layers of double (x, y) silicon strip coordinate detectors (pitch of 0.08mm). The first three and final one layers are without tungsten while the middle nine layers are interleaved with nine tungsten conversion foils. The thickness of CC1 and CC2 is 2 X0 (0.1λ0) and 23 X0 (1.1λ0) respectively (where X0 is radiation length and λ0 is nuclear interaction one). The total calorimeter thickness is 25 X0 or 1.2λ0 for vertical incident particles registration and 54 X0 or 2.5λ0 for laterally incident ones.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Physics Procedia
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    ABSTRACT: We report results on multiband observations from radio to γ-rays of the two radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLSy1) galaxies PKS 2004−447 and J1548+3511. Both sources show a core–jet structure on parsec scale, while they are unresolved at the arcsecond scale. The high core dominance and the high variability brightness temperature make these NLSy1 galaxies good γ-ray source candidates. Fermi-Large Area Telescope detected γ-ray emission only from PKS 2004−447, with a γ-ray luminosity comparable to that observed in blazars. No γ-ray emission is observed for J1548+3511. Both sources are variable in X-rays. J1548+3511 shows a hardening of the spectrum during high activity states, while PKS 2004−447 has no spectral variability. A spectral steepening likely related to the soft excess is hinted below 2 keV for J1548+3511, while the X-ray spectra of PKS 2004−447 collected by XMM–Newton in 2012 are described by a single power law without significant soft excess. No additional absorption above the Galactic column density or the presence of an Fe line is detected in the X-ray spectra of both sources.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    ABSTRACT: The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope with excellent angular and energy resolutions is designed to search for signatures of dark matter in the fluxes of gamma-ray emission and electrons + positrons. Precision investigations of gamma-ray emission from Galactic Center, Crab, Vela, Cygnus, Geminga, and other regions will be performed, as well as diffuse gamma-ray emission, along with measurements of high-energy electron + positron and nuclei fluxes. Furthermore, it will study gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun during periods of solar activity. The energy range of GAMMA-400 is expected to be from ~20 MeV up to TeV energies for gamma rays, up to 20 TeV for electrons + positrons, and up to 10E15 eV for cosmic-ray nuclei. For high-energy gamma rays with energy from 10 to 100 GeV, the GAMMA-400 angular resolution improves from 0.1{\deg} to ~0.01{\deg} and energy resolution from 3% to ~1%; the proton rejection factor is ~5x10E5. GAMMA-400 will be installed onboard the Russian space observatory.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015
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    ABSTRACT: We study the properties of a significant thermal emission component that was identified in 47 GRBs observed by different instruments. Within the framework of the "fireball" model, we deduce the values of the Lorentz factor Gamma, and the acceleration radius, r_0, for these bursts. We find that all the values of Gamma in our sample are in the range 10^2 <= Gamma <= 10^3, with = 310. We find a very weak dependence of Gamma on the acceleration radius r_0, Gamma ~ r_0^alpha with alpha = -0.10 +- 0.09 at sigma = 2.1 confidence level. The values of r_0 span a wide range, 10^7 <= r_0 <= 10^{9.5} cm, with mean value ~10^{8.5} cm. This is higher than the gravitational radius of a 10 M_sun black hole by a factor ~100. We argue that this result provides indirect evidence for jet propagation inside a massive star, and suggests the existence of recollimation shocks that take place close to this radius.
    Preview · Article · Jul 2015 · The Astrophysical Journal
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    Björn Ahlgren · Josefin Larsson · Tanja Nymark · Felix Ryde · Asaf Pe'er
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    ABSTRACT: The origin of the prompt emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is still an unsolved problem and several different mechanisms have been suggested. Here, we fit Fermi GRB data with a photospheric emission model which includes dissipation of the jet kinetic energy below the photosphere. The resulting spectra are dominated by Comptonization and contain no significant contribution from synchrotron radiation. In order to fit to the data, we span a physically motivated part of the model's parameter space and create DREAM (Dissipation with Radiative Emission as A table Model), a table model for XSPEC. We show that this model can describe different kinds of GRB spectra, including GRB 090618, representing a typical Band function spectrum, and GRB 100724B, illustrating a double peaked spectrum, previously fitted with a Band+blackbody model, suggesting they originate from a similar scenario. We suggest that the main difference between these two types of bursts is the optical depth at the dissipation site.
    Preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Letters
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    ABSTRACT: We present imaging and spectroscopic observations with HST and VLT of the ring of SN 1987A from 1994 to 2014. After an almost exponential increase of the shocked emission from the hotspots up to day ~8,000 (~2009), both this and the unshocked emission are now fading. From the radial positions of the hotspots we see an acceleration of these up to 500-1000 km/s, consistent with the highest spectroscopic shock velocities from the radiative shocks. In the most recent observations (2013 and 2014), we find several new hotspots outside the inner ring, excited by either X-rays from the shocks or by direct shock interaction. All of these observations indicate that the interaction with the supernova ejecta is now gradually dissolving the hotspots. We predict, based on the observed decay, that the inner ring will be destroyed by ~2025.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015
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    F. D'Ammando · M. Orienti · J. Larsson · M. Giroletti
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    ABSTRACT: We report the discovery of γ-ray emission from the narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLSy1) galaxy FBQS J1644+2619 by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite. The Third Fermi LAT Source catalogue reports an unidentified γ-ray source, detected over the first four years of Fermi operation, 0 $_{.}^{\circ}$23 from the radio position of the NLSy1. Analysing 76 months of γ-ray data (2008 August 4–2014 December 31) we are able to better constrain the localization of the γ-ray source. The new position of the γ-ray source is 0 $_{.}^{\circ}$05 from FBQS J1644+2619, suggesting a spatial association with the NLSy1. This is the sixth NLSy1 detected at high significance by Fermi-LAT so far. Notably, a significant increase of activity was observed in γ-rays from FBQS J1644+2619 during 2012 July–October, and an increase of activity in the V band was detected by the Catalina Real-Time Sky Survey in the same period.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    ABSTRACT: The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern with the following scientific goals: search for signatures of dark matter, investigation of gamma-ray point and extended sources, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the active Sun, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons, and nuclei up to the knee. The main components of cosmic rays are protons and helium nuclei, whereas the part of lepton component in the total flux is ~10E-3 for high energies. In present paper, the capability of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope to distinguish electrons and positrons from protons in cosmic rays is investigated. The individual contribution to the proton rejection is studied for each detector system of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope. Using combined information from all detector systems allow us to provide the proton rejection from electrons with a factor of ~4x10E5 for vertical incident particles and ~3x10E5 for particles with initial inclination of 30 degrees. The calculations were performed for the electron energy range from 50 GeV to 1 TeV.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Advances in Space Research
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    ABSTRACT: Much evidence points towards that the photosphere in the relativistic outflow in GRBs plays an important role in shaping the observed MeV spectrum. However, it is unclear whether the spectrum is fully produced by the photosphere or whether a substantial part of the spectrum is added by processes far above the photosphere. Here we make a detailed study of the γ-ray emission from single pulse GRB110920A which has a spectrum that becomes extremely narrow towards the end of the burst. We show that the emission can be interpreted as Comptonization of thermal photons by cold electrons in an unmagnetized outflow at an optical depth of τ ∼ 20. The electrons receive their energy by a local dissipation occurring close to the saturation radius. The main spectral component of GRB110920A and its evolution is thus, in this interpretation, fully explained by the emission from the photosphere including localized dissipation at high optical depths.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
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    ABSTRACT: Before the launch of the Fermi satellite only two classes of Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) were known to generate relativistic jets and thus to emit up to the gamma-ray energy range: blazars and radio galaxies, both hosted in giant elliptical galaxies. The first four years of observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board Fermi confirmed that these two populations represent the most numerous identified sources in the extragalactic gamma-ray sky, but the discovery of variable gamma-ray emission from 5 radio-loud Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 (NLSy1) galaxies revealed the presence of a possible emerging third class of AGN with relativistic jets. Considering that NLSy1 are thought to be hosted in spiral galaxies, this finding poses intriguing questions about the nature of these objects, the knowledge of the development of relativistic jets, and the evolution of radio-loud AGN. In this context, the study of the radio-loud NLSy1 from radio to gamma-rays has received increasing attention. Here we discuss the radio-to-gamma-rays properties of the gamma-ray emitting NLSy1, also in comparison with the blazar scenario.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2015
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    ABSTRACT: We present new Hubble Space Telescope images of high-velocity Hα and Lyα emission in the outer debris of SN 1987 A. The Hα images are dominated by emission from hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock (RS). For the first time we observe emission from the RS surface well above and below the equatorial ring (ER), suggesting a bipolar or conical structure perpendicular to the ring plane. Using the Hα imaging, we measure the mass flux of hydrogen atoms crossing the RS front, in the velocity intervals (−7500 < Vobs < −2800 km s−1) and (1000 < Vobs < 7500 km s−1), = 1.2 × 10−3M yr−1. We also present the first Lyα imaging of the whole remnant and new Chandra X-ray observations. Comparing the spatial distribution of the Lyα and X-ray emission, we observe that the majority of the high-velocity Lyα emission originates interior to the ER. The observed Lyα/Hα photon ratio, ≈ 17, is significantly higher than the theoretically predicted ratio of ≈5 for neutral atoms crossing the RS front. We attribute this excess to Lyα emission produced by X-ray heating of the outer debris. The spatial orientation of the Lyα and X-ray emission suggests that X-ray heating of the outer debris is the dominant Lyα production mechanism in SN 1987 A at this phase in its evolution.
    No preview · Article · Mar 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The development of the GAMMA-400 γ-ray telescope continues. The GAMMA-400 is designed to measure fluxes of γ-rays and the electron-positron cosmic-ray component possibly associated with annihilation or decay of dark matter particles; and to search for and study in detail discrete γ-ray sources, to measure the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse γ-rays, and to study γ-ray bursts and γ-rays from the active Sun. The energy range for measuring γ-rays and electrons (positrons) is from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. For 100-GeV γ-rays, the γ-ray telescope has an angular resolution of ∼0.01°, an energy resolution of ∼1%, and a proton rejection factor of ∼5 × 105. The GAMMA-400 will be installed onboard the Russian Space Observatory.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Bulletin of the Russian Academy of Sciences Physics
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    ABSTRACT: We present new {\it Hubble Space Telescope} images of high-velocity H-$\alpha$ and Lyman-$\alpha$ emission in the outer debris of SN~1987A. The H-$\alpha$ images are dominated by emission from hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock. For the first time we observe emission from the reverse shock surface well above and below the equatorial ring, suggesting a bipolar or conical structure perpendicular to the ring plane. Using the H$\alpha$ imaging, we measure the mass flux of hydrogen atoms crossing the reverse shock front, in the velocity intervals ($-$7,500~$<$~$V_{obs}$~$<$~$-$2,800 km s$^{-1}$) and (1,000~$<$~$V_{obs}$~$<$~7,500 km s$^{-1}$), $\dot{M_{H}}$ = 1.2~$\times$~10$^{-3}$ M$_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$. We also present the first Lyman-$\alpha$ imaging of the whole remnant and new $Chandra$ X-ray observations. Comparing the spatial distribution of the Lyman-$\alpha$ and X-ray emission, we observe that the majority of the high-velocity Lyman-$\alpha$ emission originates interior to the equatorial ring. The observed Lyman-$\alpha$/H-$\alpha$ photon ratio, $\langle$$R(L\alpha / H\alpha)$$\rangle$ $\approx$~17, is significantly higher than the theoretically predicted ratio of $\approx$ 5 for neutral atoms crossing the reverse shock front. We attribute this excess to Lyman-$\alpha$ emission produced by X-ray heating of the outer debris. The spatial orientation of the Lyman-$\alpha$ and X-ray emission suggests that X-ray heating of the outer debris is the dominant Lyman-$\alpha$ production mechanism in SN 1987A at this phase in its evolution.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015
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    ABSTRACT: GAMMA-400 is a new space mission, designed as a dual experiment, capable to study both high energy gamma rays (from $\sim$100 MeV to few TeV) and cosmic rays (electrons up to 20 TeV and nuclei up to $\sim$10$^{15}$ eV). The full simulation framework of GAMMA-400 is based on the Geant4 toolkit. The details of the gamma-ray reconstruction pipeline in the three main instruments (Tracker, Imaging Calorimeter, Homogeneous Calorimeter) will be outlined. The performance of GAMMA-400 (PSF, effective area and sensitivity) have been obtained using this framework. The most updated results on them will be shown.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015
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    ABSTRACT: GAMMA-400 is a new space mission which will be installed on board the Russian space platform Navigator. It is scheduled to be launched at the beginning of the next decade. GAMMA-400 is designed to study simultaneously gamma rays (up to 3 TeV) and cosmic rays (electrons and positrons from 1 GeV to 20 TeV, nuclei up to 10$^{15}$-10$^{16}$ eV). Being a dual-purpose mission, GAMMA-400 will be able to address some of the most impelling science topics, such as search for signatures of dark matter, cosmic-rays origin and propagation, and the nature of transients. GAMMA-400 will try to solve the unanswered questions on these topics by high-precision measurements of the Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission and the spectra of cosmic-ray electrons + positrons and nuclei, thanks to excellent energy and angular resolutions.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015
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    J. Larsson · J. L. Racusin · J. M. Burgess
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    ABSTRACT: We present observations by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) of the nearby (z=0.55) GRB 101219B. This burst is a long GRB, with an associated supernova and with a blackbody component detected in the early afterglow observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). Here we show that the prompt gamma-ray emission has a blackbody spectrum, making this the second such burst observed by Fermi GBM. The properties of the blackbody, together with the redshift and our estimate of the radiative efficiency, makes it possible to calculate the absolute values of the properties of the outflow. We obtain an initial Lorentz factor Gamma=138\pm 8, a photospheric radius r_phot=4.4\pm 1.9 \times 10^{11} cm and a launch radius r_0=2.7\pm 1.6 \times 10^{7} cm. The latter value is close to the event horizon for a stellar-mass black hole and suggests that the jet has a relatively unobstructed path through the star. There is no smooth connection between the blackbody components seen by GBM and XRT, ruling out the scenario that the late emission is due to high-latitude effects. In the interpretation that the XRT blackbody is prompt emission due to late central engine activity, the jet either has to be very wide or have a clumpy structure where the emission originates from a small patch. Other explanations for this component, such as emission from a cocoon surrounding the jet, are also possible.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015
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    ABSTRACT: The present design of the new space observatory GAMMA-400 is presented in this paper. The instrument has been designed for the optimal detection of gamma rays in a broad energy range (from ~100 MeV up to 3 TeV), with excellent angular and energy resolution. The observatory will also allow precise and high statistic studies of the electron component in the cosmic rays up to the multi TeV region, as well as protons and nuclei spectra up to the knee region. The GAMMA-400 observatory will allow to address a broad range of science topics, like search for signatures of dark matter, studies of Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, gamma-ray bursts and charged cosmic rays acceleration and diffusion mechanism up to the knee.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014
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    ABSTRACT: The measurements of gamma-ray fluxes and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV, which will be implemented by the specially designed GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope, concern with the following broad range of science topics. Searching for signatures of dark matter, surveying the celestial sphere in order to study gamma-ray point and extended sources, measuring the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, studying gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measuring spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons and nuclei up to the knee. To clarify these scientific problems with the new experimental data the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics comparing with previous and present experiments. For gamma-ray energies more than 100 GeV GAMMA-400 provides the energy resolution of ~1% and angular resolution better than 0.02 deg. The methods developed to reconstruct the direction of incident gamma photon are presented in this paper, as well as, the capability of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope to distinguish electrons and positrons from protons in cosmic rays is investigated.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014