I L Bernstein

Wright State University, Dayton, Ohio, United States

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Publications (202)

  • Source
    Moira Chan-Yeung · I. Leonard Bernstein · Susanna Von Essen · Jill A. Poole
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Objective: Recent studies have made advances into understanding the complex agriculture work exposure environment in influencing asthma in adults. The objective of this study is to review studies of occupational agricultural exposures including dust, animal, and pesticide exposures with asthma in adult populations. Data sources: PubMed databases were searched for articles pertaining to farming, agriculture, asthma, occupational asthma, airway inflammation , respiratory disease, lung disease, pesticides, and organic dust. Study selections: Studies chosen were published in or after 1999 that included adults and asthma and farming/ agricultural work or agricultural exposures and airway inflammatory disease measurements. Results: The data remain inconclusive. Several retrospective studies demonstrate agricultural work to be protective against asthma in adults, especially with increased farming exposure over time. In contrast, other studies find increased risk of asthma with farming exposures, especially for the non-atopic adult. Mechanistic and genetic studies have focused on defining the wide variety and abundance of microorganisms within these complex organic dusts that trigger several pattern recognition receptor pathways to modulate the hosts' response. Conclusion: Asthma risk depends on the interplay of genetic factors, gender, atopic predisposition, type of livestock, pesticide exposure, and magnitude and duration of exposure in the adult subject. Longer exposure to occupational farming is associated with decreased asthma risk. However, studies also suggest that agricultural work and multiple types of livestock are independent risk factors for developing asthma. Prospective and longitudinal studies focusing on genetic polymorphisms, objective assessments, and environmental sampling are needed to further delineate the influence of agriculture exposure in the adult worker.
    Full-text Chapter · May 2013
  • I. Leonard Bernstein · David I. Bernstein · Moira Chan-Yeung · Jean-Luc Malo
    Chapter · May 2013
  • Jack Pepys · I. Leonard Bernstein · Jean-Luc Malo
    Chapter · May 2013
  • Stuart M Brooks · I Leonard Bernstein
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Thousands of persons experience accidental high-level irritant exposures each year but most recover and few die. Irritants function differently than allergens because their actions proceed nonspecifically and by nonimmunologic mechanisms. For some individuals, the consequence of a single massive exposure to an irritant, gas, vapor or fume is persistent airway hyperresponsiveness and the clinical picture of asthma, referred to as reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS). Repeated irritant exposures may lead to chronic cough and continual airway hyperresponsiveness. Cases of asthma attributed to repeated irritant-exposures may be the result of genetic and/or host factors.
    Article · Nov 2011 · Immunology and allergy clinics of North America
  • Source
    Jonathan A Bernstein · Debajyoti Ghosh · Linda S Levin · [...] · I Leonard Bernstein
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: This study was designed to investigate the prevalence of skin sensitization using detoxified cyanobacterial reagents in a chronic rhinitis population. Subjects ≥6 years of age who presented for allergy consultation to a community allergy practice and required skin-prick testing (SPT) to common seasonal and perennial aeroallergens were enrolled after signing an informed consent. Detoxified cyanobacteria species were used for skin testing. Skin testing of unexposed, nonsensitized control subjects using these detoxified cyanobacterial skin test reagents was performed to identify irritant threshold responses. All subjects signed an Institutional Review Board-approved informed consent before participation. Two hundred fifty-nine patients ranging in age between 7 and 78 years old underwent testing. The majority were white female patients and over two-thirds (73.4%) were atopic. Seventy-four (28.6% of the population) patients were SPT(+) to at least one of the cyanobacteria species. Positive SPTs were present in 86% of patients to Microcystis aeruginosa and 12% of patients to Aphanizomenon-flos aquae. There was a strong association between severity of atopy (number of positive SPTs), having allergic rhinitis and sensitization to one or more cyanobacteria species (p < 0.001). This is the first study to show that cyanobacterial allergenicity resides in nontoxin-containing components of this organism.
    Full-text Article · Mar 2011 · Allergy and Asthma Proceedings
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Women have exhibited anaphylaxis, urticaria/angioedema, and autoimmune progesterone dermatitis (APD) coinciding with the progesterone premenstrual rise. We report a detailed immunological evaluation of such a woman responsive to a gonadotropin hormone-releasing agonist (GHRA). Skin testing, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), leukocyte histamine release (LHR), and inhibition assays were performed to demonstrate progesterone immunoresponsiveness. Serum specific-progesterone immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgE were detected initially and disappeared 6 months after GHRA treatment. Dose-response LHR using patient basophils was observed for different hormones but after 3 months persisted only for 5β-pregnanediol. Preincubation with mouse antiprogesterone monoclonal antibody (PmAb) or mifepristone, a progesterone inhibitor, over a range of doses inhibited specific progesterone-induced LHR. Experiments with varying progesterone concentrations and a fixed dose of anti-IgE resulted in 100% LHR at a concentration as low as 0.016 nmol/mL, which, without anti-IgE, failed to release histamine. This is the first report of combined recurrent anaphylaxis, cyclic urticaria/angioedema, and APD induced by immunoresponsiveness to progesterone.
    Full-text Article · Mar 2011 · Journal of Women's Health
  • Roland Solensky · David A. Khan · I. Leonard Bernstein · [...] · Lawrence B. Schwartz
    Article · Oct 2010 · Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology
  • Jonathan A. Bernstein · I. Leonard Bernstein
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Occupational asthma is believed to be responsible for up to 15% of all new cases of asthma in the United States. Evaluation of patients with asthma, therefore, requires a careful and complete work history to identify or exclude potential causes or triggers for asthma. It is important for the clinician to have a strong understanding of how to evaluate and manage work-related asthma induced by both high and low molecular weight agents. The following clinical cases are designed to provide a template of how patients suspected with occupational asthma should be evaluated in order to definitively confirm this diagnosis. KeywordsOccupational asthma–Egg lysozyme–Benzalkonium chloride
    Chapter · Jun 2009
  • Source
    I Leonard Bernstein · James T Li · David I Bernstein · [...] · Richard Weber
    Full-text Article · Apr 2008 · Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology
  • Source
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: There is growing public awareness regarding the risk associated with poor indoor air quality in the home and workplace. Because Americans spend approximately 22 hours every day indoors, susceptible individuals are at much greater risk of adverse health effects from chronic low levels of exposure to indoor air pollutants over time. Along with particulate matter, gases such as ozone, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide; microbial and chemical volatile organic compounds; passive smoke; and outdoor ambient air are the most common types of air pollutants encountered indoors. To provide the allergists with necessary information that will assist them in making useful recommendations to patients seeking advice regarding indoor environmental triggers beyond traditional perennial allergens. Review of the literature pertaining to indoor exposure and health effects of gaseous and particular matter. Indoor pollutants act as respiratory irritants, toxicants, and adjuvants or carriers of allergens. The allergist should be prepared to evaluate patient exposure to allergic and nonallergic triggers and understand how outdoor air pollution is affecting indoor environments. This requires being familiar with methodologies for monitoring and interpreting indoor air quality and interpreting results in the context of the patients exposure history and advising patients about rational environmental control interventions.
    Full-text Article · Apr 2008 · The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology
  • I Leonard Bernstein
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: To review the evolution of our understanding of hereditary angioedema (HAE) from the first historical reference to the present day. MEDLINE and PubMed were searched using the following keywords: history of HAE, C1 inhibitor, complements system, genetics of HAE, mechanisms of HAE, and treatment of HAE. Information was selected that outlines the advances made in complementology, the first report of HAE, and subsequent studies that elucidated the underlying mechanisms of this disease, leading to current therapy of this orphan disease. Generational research efforts in HAE have focused on the following: (1) several new clinical presentations, (2) acquired forms of non-histamine-induced angioedema, (3) the genetic basis for the inherited forms, (4) the effects of C1 inhibitor on contact phases of coagulation-fibrinolytic pathways, and (5) various therapies for short- and long-term control of the disease. The progress made in understanding the pathogenesis and treatment of HAE is an excellent example of the "bench to the bedside" paradigm involving the collaboration between clinicians and researchers.
    Article · Feb 2008 · Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology
  • I.L. Bernstein · J.T. Li · D.I. Bernstein · [...] · R. Tan
    Article · Jan 2008
  • Source
    Vincent S. Beltrani · I. Leonard Bernstein · David E. Cohen · Luz Fonacier
    Full-text Article · Sep 2006 · Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology
  • Source
    Chief Editors · Jean A Chapman · I Leonard Bernstein · [...] · Suzanne S Teuber
    Full-text Article · Mar 2006 · Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology
  • Source
    Raymond G Slavin · Sheldon L Spector · I Leonard Bernstein · [...] · Mark L Vandewalker
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: These parameters were developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology; and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) have jointly accepted responsibility for establishing “The diagnosis and management of sinusitis: a practice parameter update.” This is a complete and comprehensive document at the current time. The medical environment is a changing environment, and not all recommendations will be appropriate for all patients. Because this document incorporated the efforts of many participants, no single individual, including those who served on the Joint Task force, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters. Any request for information about or an interpretation of these practice parameters by the AAAAI or the ACAAI should be directed to the Executive Offices of the AAAAI, the ACAAI, and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. These parameters are not designed for use by pharmaceutical companies in drug promotion.
    Full-text Article · Jan 2006 · Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
  • Source
    James T. Li · John Oppenheimer · I. Leonard Bernstein · [...] · Dana V. Wallace
    Full-text Article · Nov 2005 · Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
  • Source
    Francisco A Bonilla · I Leonard Bernstein · David A Khan · [...] · Ricardo U Sorensen
    Full-text Article · Jun 2005 · Annals of allergy, asthma & immunology: official publication of the American College of Allergy, Asthma, & Immunology
  • David M. Lang · I. Leonard Bernstein · Richard A. Nicklas · [...] · Albert L. Sheffer
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: These parameters were developed by the Joint Task Force on Practice Parameters, representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology; the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology; and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. The American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI) and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) have jointly accepted responsibility for establishing “The diagnosis and management of anaphylaxis: an updated practice parameter.” This is a complete and comprehensive document at the current time. The medical environment is a changing environment, and not all recommendations will be appropriate for all patients. Because this document incorporated the efforts of many participants, no single individual, including those who served on the Joint Task force, is authorized to provide an official AAAAI or ACAAI interpretation of these practice parameters. Any request for information about or an interpretation of these practice parameters by the AAAAI or ACAAI should be directed to the Executive Offices of the AAAAI, the ACAAI, and the Joint Council of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. These parameters are not designed for use by pharmaceutical companies in drug promotion. This is a complete and comprehensive document at the current time. The medical environment is a changing environment, and not all recommendations will be appropriate for all patients.
    Article · Mar 2005
  • Source
    Full-text Article · Nov 2004 · Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology
  • [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: The general public, especially patients with upper or lower respiratory symptoms, is aware from media reports that adverse respiratory effects can occur from air pollution. It is important for the allergist to have a current knowledge of the potential health effects of air pollution and how they might affect their patients to advise them accordingly. Specifically, the allergist-clinical immunologist should be keenly aware that both gaseous and particulate outdoor pollutants might aggravate or enhance the underlying pathophysiology of both the upper and lower airways. Epidemiologic and laboratory exposure research studies investigating the health effects of outdoor air pollution each have advantages and disadvantages. Epidemiologic studies can show statistical associations between levels of individual or combined air pollutants and outcomes, such as rates of asthma, emergency visits for asthma, or hospital admissions, but cannot prove a causative role. Human exposure studies, animal models, and tissue or cellular studies provide further information on mechanisms of response but also have inherent limitations. The aim of this rostrum is to review the relevant publications that provide the appropriate context for assessing the risks of air pollution relative to other more modifiable environmental factors in patients with allergic airways disease.
    Article · Nov 2004 · Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

Publication Stats

8k Citations

Institutions

  • 2000
    • Wright State University
      Dayton, Ohio, United States
  • 1999
    • Cornell University
      Итак, New York, United States
  • 1998
    • Pennsylvania State University
      • Department of Pediatrics
      University Park, Maryland, United States
  • 1988-1996
    • University of Cincinnati
      • Department of Internal Medicine
      Cincinnati, Ohio, United States
  • 1995
    • George Washington University
      Washington, Washington, D.C., United States
  • 1993-1994
    • University of Cincinnati Medical Center
      Cincinnati, Ohio, United States