Gouke J Bonsel

Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands

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Publications (373)1190.14 Total impact

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    ABSTRACT: Background: To study the knowledge of a large city population on preconception folic acid supplementation and intention to seek for preconception care within an urban perinatal health program. Methods: Cross-sectional surveys run in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, in 2007 and annually from 2009 to 2014. A random sample of residents aged between 16 and 85 years was taken each year from the municipal population register. Bivariate analysis, interaction analysis, trend analysis and logistic regression were performed. Results: Knowledge on preconceptional folic acid supplementation significantly improved (+20 %) between 2007 and 2009, and the intention to consult a GP or midwife in the preconception period significantly increased (+53 %) from 2007 to 2012. Logistic regression analyses showed that low socio-economic status was significantly associated with low preconceptional folic acid knowledge, but with higher intention to seek out preconception care. An interaction effect was found between educational level and ethnicity, showing that the higher the educational level the lower the gap of level of knowledge between the different ethnic groups. Conclusion: Despite campaigns about folic acid supplementation knowledge on this supplement remains low. The intention amongst men and women to seek out preconception care is still insufficient. Structural interventions to increase and maintain awareness on folic acid supplementation, especially among high-risk groups, are needed.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
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    ABSTRACT: Background: A total of 75% of monozygotic twins share 1 monochorionic placenta where placental anastomoses cause several serious complications, for example, acardiac twinning. Acardiac twins lack cardiac function but grow by perfusion of arterial blood from the pump twin. This rare pregnancy has 50% natural pump twin mortality but accurate risk prediction is currently impossible. Recent guidelines suggest prophylactic surgery before 18 weeks, suggesting 50% unnecessary interventions. We hypothesize that (1) adverse pump twin outcome relates to easy-to-measure pump/acardiac umbilical venous diameter (UVD) ratios, representing acardiac perfusion by the pump's excess cardiac output. This hypothesis suggests that (2) UVD-ratios are large, mildly varying in cases without complications but small and decreasing when complications develop, thus predicting that (3) UVD-ratios may allow risk prediction of pump twins. In this exploratory clinical pilot, we tested whether UVD-ratio measurements support these predictions. Methods: We included 7 uncomplicated (expectant management), 3 elective surgical, and 17 complicated cases (pump decompensation, emergency intervention/delivery or demise). Nine UVD-ratios were measured sonographycally and 18 by pathology. Results: Uncomplicated cases have larger, two serial measurements showing mildly varying UVD-ratios; elective surgical cases show larger UVD-ratios; complicated cases have smaller, two serial measurements showing decreasing UVD-ratios. There were no false-positives, no false-negatives and noncrossing linear trendlines of uncomplicated and complicated cohorts. Conclusion: Our data provide first evidence that UVD-ratios allow risk prediction of pump twins. More early uncomplicated and late complicated cases are needed, for example, in a prospective trial, before the separation between uncomplicated and complicated cohorts is accurate enough to support a well-founded decision on (early) intervention. Birth Defects Research (Part A), 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Birth Defects Research Part A Clinical and Molecular Teratology
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    ABSTRACT: Mental disorders are prevalent during pregnancy, affecting 10% of women worldwide. To improve triage of a broad spectrum of mental disorders, we investigated the decision impact validity of: 1) a short set of currently used psychiatric triage items, 2) this set with the inclusion of some more specific psychiatric items (intermediate set), 3) this new set with the addition of the 10-item Edinburgh Depression Scale (extended set), and 4) the final set with the addition of common psychosocial co-predictors (comprehensive set). This was a validation study including 330 urban pregnant women. Women completed a questionnaire including 20 psychiatric and 10 psychosocial items. Psychiatric diagnosis (gold standard) was obtained through Structured Clinical Interviews of DSM-IV axis I and II disorders (SCID-I and II). The outcome measure of our analysis was presence (yes/no) of any current mental disorder. The performance of the short, intermediate, extended, and comprehensive triage models was evaluated by multiple logistic regression analysis, by analysis of the area under the ROC curve (AUC) and through associated performance measures, including, for example, sensitivity, specificity and the number of missed cases. Diagnostic performance of the short triage model (1) was acceptable (Nagelkerke's R(2)=0.276, AUC=0.740, 48 out of 131 cases were missed). The intermediate model (2) performed better (R(2)=0.547, AUC=0.883, 22 cases were missed) including the five items: ever experienced a traumatic event, ever had feelings of a depressed mood, ever had a panic attack, current psychiatric symptoms and current severe depressive or anxious symptoms. Addition of the 10-item Edinburgh Depression Scale or the three psychosocial items unplanned pregnancy, alcohol consumption and sexual/physical abuse (models 3 and 4) further increased R(2) and AUC (>0.900), with 23 cases missed. Missed cases included pregnant women with a current eating disorder, psychotic disorder and the first onset of anxiety disorders. For a valid detection of the full spectrum of common mental disorders during pregnancy, at least the intermediate set of five psychiatric items should be implemented in routine obstetric care. For a brief yet comprehensive triage, three high impact psychosocial items should be added as independent contributors.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
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    ABSTRACT: The incidence of severe postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is increasing. Regional variation may be attributed to variation in provision of care, and as such contribute to this increasing incidence. We assessed reasons for regional variation in severe PPH in the Netherlands. We used the Netherlands Perinatal Registry and the Dutch Maternal Mortality Committee to study severe PPH incidences (defined as blood loss ≥ 1000 mL) across both regions and neighborhoods of cities among all deliveries between 2000 and 2008. We first calculated crude incidences. We then used logistic multilevel regression analyses, with hospital or midwife practice as second level to explore further reasons for the regional variation. We analyzed 1599867 deliveries in which the incidence of severe PPH was 4.5%. Crude incidences of severe PPH varied with factor three between regions while between neighborhoods variation was even larger. We could not explain regional variation by maternal characteristics (age, parity, ethnicity, socioeconomic status), pregnancy characteristics (singleton, gestational age, birth weight, pre-eclampsia, perinatal death), medical interventions (induction of labor, mode of delivery, perineal laceration, placental removal) and health care setting. In a nationwide study in The Netherlands, we observed wide practice variation in PPH. This variation could not be explained by maternal characteristics, pregnancy characteristics, medical interventions or health care setting. Regional variation is either unavoidable or subsequent to regional variation of a yet unregistered variable.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
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    ABSTRACT: in the Netherlands the perinatal mortality rate is high compared to other European countries. Around eighty percent of perinatal mortality cases is preceded by being small for gestational age (SGA), preterm birth and/or having a low Apgar-score at 5 minutes after birth. Current risk detection in pregnancy focusses primarily on medical risks. However, non-medical risk factors may be relevant too. Both non-medical and medical risk factors are incorporated in the Rotterdam Reproductive Risk Reduction (R4U) scorecard.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · Midwifery
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    ABSTRACT: In a national perinatal health programme, we observed striking heterogeneity in the explanation of the most prominent risks across municipalities. Therefore we explored the separate contribution of several socio-demographic risks on perinatal health inequalities between municipalities and neighbourhoods. The study aims to identify perinatal health inequalities on the neighbourhood level across the selected municipalities, and to objectify the contribution of socio-demographic risk factors on pregnancy outcomes in each municipality by the application of the population attributable risk concept. Population based cohort study (2000-2008). Perinatal outcomes of 352,407 single pregnancies from 15 municipalities were analysed. Odds ratios and population attributable risks were calculated. Main outcomes were combined perinatal morbidity (small-for-gestational age, preterm birth, congenital anomalies, and low Apgar score), and perinatal mortality. Perinatal health inequalities existed on both the municipal and the neighbourhood level. In municipalities, combined perinatal morbidity ranged from 17.3 to 23.6 %, and perinatal mortality ranges from 10.1 to 15.4 ‰. Considerable differences in low socio-economic status between municipalities were apparent, with prevalences ranging from 14.4 to 82.5 %. In seven municipalities, significant differences between neighbourhoods existed for perinatal morbidity (adjusted OR ranging from 1.33 to 2.38) and for perinatal mortality (adjusted OR ranging from 2.06 to 5.59). For some municipalities, socio-demographic risk factors were s a strong predictor for the observed inequalities, but in other municipalities these factors were very weak predictors. If all socio-demographic determinants were set to the most favourable value in a predictive model, combined perinatal morbidity would decrease with 15 to 39 % in these municipalities. Substantial differences in perinatal morbidity and mortality between municipalities and neighbourhoods exist. Different patterns of inequality suggest differences in etiology. Policy makers and healthcare professionals need to be informed about their local perinatal health profiles in order to introduce antenatal healthcare tailored to the individual and neighbourhood environment.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015 · BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth

  • No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology
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    ABSTRACT: The results of 4 years ‘Ready for a Baby’: an urban multidisciplinary health programme for obstetric and midwifery care in Rotterdam In response to the high rate of adverse birth outcomes in Rotterdam, the second largest city in the Netherlands, a multi-year public health programme was initiated in which the local public health authorities collaborated with the academic medical center and caregivers throughout the city. The main goal was to reduce the rate of adverse birth outcomes while primarily focusing on risk-appropriate care and coordination of pregnancy-related care. In this article we aim to describe the most important results from the 4-year Rotterdam ‘Ready for a Baby’ progamme which was implemented from 2009 to 2012.
    No preview · Article · Jul 2015
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    ABSTRACT: To evaluate differences between consultants of different disciplines in the prenatal prediction of the type of postnatal surgical closure of an omphalocele. Twenty-one images of prenatally detected omphaloceles prior to 24 weeks of gestation were included. A standardized form provided known prenatal information and an ultrasound image for each case. Nineteen consultants were asked to assess the probability of primary closure of an omphalocele and to state which information was the most important for their assessment. Primary closure (13/21 images) was predicted correctly in 5/13 images. The number of correct predictions per image ranged from 63 to 89%. The type of closure was predicted correctly in 7/8 images of cases which were not closed primarily, ranging from 58 to 84% correct predictions per image. There was no significant difference between consultants of different disciplines. Individual accuracy ranged from 10 to 62%. The consultants regarded omphalocele content as the most important information (34%) for counseling. The consultants did not differ in their prenatal judgment of the primary closure of an omphalocele. The consultants tended to be too negative in their assessment, since 75% assessed the probability of primary closure overall to be <60%, whereas 62% of the cases were primarily closed. Omphalocele content was the most important information for the consultants' judgment. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2015 · Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy
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    ABSTRACT: Health systems' responsiveness encompasses attributes of health system encounters valued by people and measured from the user's perspective in eight domains: dignity, autonomy, confidentiality, communication, prompt attention, social support, quality of basic amenities and choice. The literature advocates for adjusting responsiveness measures for reporting behaviour heterogeneity, which refers to differential use of the response scale by survey respondents. Reporting behaviour heterogeneity between individual respondents compromises comparability between countries and population subgroups. It can be studied through analysing responses to pre-defined vignettes – hypothetical scenarios recounting a third person's experience in a health care setting. This paper describes the first comprehensive approach to studying reporting behaviour heterogeneity using vignettes. Individual-level variables affecting reporting behaviour are grouped into three categories: (1) sociodemographic, (2) health-related and (3) health value system. We use cross-sectional data from 150 000 respondents in 64 countries from the World Health Organization's World Health Survey (2002–03). Our approach classifies effect patterns for the scale as a whole, in terms of strength and in relation to the domains. For the final eight variables selected (sex; age; education; marital status; use of inpatient services; perceived health (own); caring for close family or friends with a chronic illness; the importance of responsiveness), the strongest effects were present for education, health, caring for friends or relatives with chronic health conditions, and the importance of responsiveness. Patterns of scale elongation or contraction were more common than uniform scale shifts and were usually constant for a particular factor across domains. The dependency of individual-level reporting behaviour heterogeneity on country is greatest for prompt attention, quality of basic amenities and confidentiality domains.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Social Science [?] Medicine
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    ABSTRACT: this study aims to identify current practice in risk assessment, current antenatal policy and referral possibilities for non-medical risk factors (lifestyle and social risk factors), and to explore the satisfaction among obstetric caregivers in their collaboration with non-obstetrical caregivers. cross-sectional study SETTING: Dutch antenatal care system PARTICIPANTS: community midwives from 139 midwifery practices and gynaecologists, hospital-based midwives, and trainees in obstetrics from 38 hospitals. results were analysed with χ(2) tests and unpaired t-tests. Caregivers universally screened upon lifestyle risk factors (e.g. smoking or drug use), whereas the screening for social risk factors (e.g. social support) was highly variable. As national guidelines are absent, local protocols were reported to be used for screening on non-medical risk factors in more than 40%. Caregivers stated multidisciplinary protocols to be a prerequisite for assessment of non-medical risk factors. Only 22% of the caregivers used predefined criteria to define when patients should be discussed multidisciplinary. despite their relevance, non-medical risk factors remain an underexposed topic in antenatal risk factor screening in both the community and hospital-based care setting. Implications for practice Structural antenatal risk assessment for non-medical risk factors with subsequent consultation opportunities is advocated, preferably based on a multidisciplinary guideline. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2015 · Midwifery
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    ABSTRACT: Study question: Do in vitro fertilization (IVF) multiples generate higher hospital costs than IVF singletons, from birth up to age 5? Summary answer: Hospital costs from birth up to age 5 were significantly higher among IVF/ICSI multiple children compared with IVF/ICSI singletons; however, when excluding the costs incurred during the birth admission period, hospital costs of multiples and singletons were comparable. What is known already: Concern has risen over the long-term outcome of children born after IVF. The increased incidence of multiple births in IVF as a result of double-embryo transfer predisposes children to a poorer neonatal outcome such as preterm birth and low birthweight. As a consequence, IVF multiples require more medical care. Costs and consequences of poorer neonatal outcomes in multiples may also exist later in life. Study design, size, duration: All 5497 children born from IVF in 2003-2005, whose parents received IVF or ICSI treatment in one of five participating Dutch IVF centers, served as a basis for a retrospective cohort study. Based on gestational age, birthweight, Apgar and congenital malformation, children were assigned to one of three risk strata (low-, moderate- or high-risk). Participants/materials, setting, methods: To enhance the efficiency of the data collection, 816 multiples and 584 singletons were selected for 5-year follow-up based on stratified (risk) sampling. Parental informed consent was received of 322 multiples and 293 singletons. Individual-level hospital resource use data (hospitalization, outpatient visits and medical procedures) were retrieved from hospital information systems and patient charts for 302 multiples and 278 singletons. Main results and the role of chance: The risk of hospitalization (OR 4.9, 95% CI 3.3-7.0), outpatient visits (OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.8-3.6) and medical procedures (OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.2) was higher for multiples compared with singletons. The average hospital costs amounted to €10 018 and €2093 during the birth admission period (P < 0.001), €1131 and €696 after the birth admission period to the first birthday (not significant (n.s.)) and €1084 and €938 from the second to the fifth life year (n.s.) for multiples and singletons, respectively. Hospital costs from birth up to age 5 were 3.3-fold higher for multiples compared with singletons (P < 0.001). Among multiples and singletons, respectively, 90.8 and 76.2% of the total hospital costs were caused by hospital admission days and 8.9 and 25.2% of the total hospital costs during the first 5 years of life occurred after the first year of life. Limitations, reasons for caution: Resource use and costs outside the hospital were not included in the analysis. Wider implications of the findings: This study confirms the increased use of healthcare resources by IVF/ICSI multiples compared with IVF/ICSI singletons. Single-embryo transfer may result in substantial savings, particularly in the birth admission period. These savings need to be compared with the extra costs of additional embryo transfers needed to achieve a successful pregnancy. Besides costs, health outcomes of children born after single-embryo transfer should be compared with those born after double-embryo transfer. Study funding/competing interests: This study was supported by a research grant (grant number 80-82310-98-09094) from the Netherlands Organization for Health Research and Development (ZonMw). There are no conflicts of interest in connection with this article. Trial registration number: Not applicable.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Human Reproduction
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    ABSTRACT: To measure the prevalence of health risk factors in women who are preparing for pregnancy, using an online publicly available questionnaire aimed at identifying personal and pre-conception risks and at providing tailored information. A nation-wide available, free, web-based, self-reported questionnaire for pre-conception use (in Dutch). Between May 2006 and August 2009, 89,946 questionnaires were completed (78,732 were from unique respondents) and available for research purposes, from which those of non-pregnant women (n = 66,617) were selected. Socio-demographic subgroups were distinguished by age, ethnicity, urban living area and living in a deprived neighbourhood. The four pre-conception risk domains were lifestyle, medical, reproductive and family history; together they were defining the risk profile. χ(2) tests were used to compare the risk profiles among the subgroups. The prevalences of the reported risk factors are given. The risk factor profiles revealed that the average, responding, non-pregnant, Dutch woman is exposed to a substantial number of risk factors. Different risk profiles were observed in the different socio-demographic subgroups. Women older than 36 years, of non-Western origin, living in urban areas and those in deprived neighbourhoods showed higher risk profiles, based on a larger number of risks, with significantly higher prevalences. Self-reported data from a large, self-selected, non-pregnant population who actively visited a web-site for reproductive information suggest the need for active general pre-conception care as risk factors were abundant. A considerable increase in attention for pre-conception care is justified; different subpopulations most likely require adapted approaches. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · Public Health Genomics
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    ABSTRACT: Growing evidence on the risk contributing role of non-medical factors on pregnancy outcomes urged for a new approach in early antenatal risk selection. The evidence invites to more integration, in particular between the clinical working area and the public health domain. We developed a non-invasive, standardized instrument for comprehensive antenatal risk assessment. The current study presents the application-oriented development of a risk screening instrument for early antenatal detection of risk factors and tailored prevention in an integrated care setting. A review of published instruments complemented with evidence from cohort studies. Selection and standardization of risk factors associated with small for gestational age, preterm birth, congenital anomalies and perinatal mortality. Risk factors were weighted to obtain a cumulative risk score. Responses were then connected to corresponding care pathways. A cumulative risk threshold was defined, which can be adapted to the population and the availability of preventive facilities. A score above the threshold implies multidisciplinary consultation between caregivers. The resulting digital score card consisted of 70 items, subdivided into four non-medical and two medical domains. Weighing of risk factors was based on existing evidence. Pilot-evidence from a cohort of 218 pregnancies in a multi-practice urban setting showed a cut-off of 16 points would imply 20% of all pregnant women to be assessed in a multidisciplinary setting. A total of 28 care pathways were defined. The resulting score card is a universal risk screening instrument which incorporates recent evidence on non-medical risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes and enables systematic risk management in an integrated antenatal health care setting.
    Preview · Article · Mar 2015 · International journal of integrated care
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    ABSTRACT: Maternity care is an integrated care process, which consists of different services, involves different professionals and covers different time windows. To measure performance of maternity care based on clients' experiences, we developed and validated a questionnaire. We used the 8-domain WHO Responsiveness model, and previous materials to develop a self-report questionnaire. A dual study design was used for development and validation. Content validity of the ReproQ-version-0 was determined through structured interviews with 11 pregnant women (≥28 weeks), 10 women who recently had given birth (≤12 weeks), and 19 maternity care professionals. Structured interviews established the domain relevance to the women; all items were separately commented on. All Responsiveness domains were judged relevant, with Dignity and Communication ranking highest. Main missing topic was the assigned expertise of the health professional. After first adaptation, construct validity of the ReproQ-version-1 was determined through a web-based survey. Respondents were approached by maternity care organizations with different levels of integration of services of midwives and obstetricians. We sent questionnaires to 605 third trimester pregnant women (response 65%), and 810 women 6 weeks after delivery (response 55%). Construct validity was based on: response patterns; exploratory factor analysis; association of the overall score with a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), known group comparisons. Median overall ReproQ score was 3.70 (range 1-4) showing good responsiveness. The exploratory factor analysis supported the assumed domain structure and suggested several adaptations. Correlation of the VAS rating and overall ReproQ score (antepartum, postpartum) supported validity (r = 0.56; 0.59, p<0.001 Spearman's correlation coefficient). Pre-stated group comparisons confirmed the expected difference following a good vs. adverse birth outcome. Fully integrated organizations performed slightly better (median = 3.78) than less integrated organizations (median = 3.63; p<0.001). Participation rate of women with a low educational level and/or a non-western origin was low. The ReproQ appears suitable for assessing quality of maternity care from the clients' perspective. Recruitment of disadvantaged groups requires additional non-digital approaches.
    Preview · Article · Feb 2015 · PLoS ONE
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    ABSTRACT: Promotion of healthy pregnancies has gained high priority in the Netherlands because of relatively unfavorable perinatal outcomes. In response, a nationwide study, 'Healthy Pregnancy 4 All' (HP4ALL), has been initiated. Part of this study involves systematic and broadened antenatal risk assessment (the Risk Assessment substudy). Risk selection in current clinical practice is mainly based on medical risk factors. Despite the increasing evidence for the influence of nonmedical risk factors (social status, lifestyle or ethnicity) on perinatal outcomes, these risk factors remain highly unexposed. Systematic risk selection, combined with customized care pathways to reduce or treat detected risks, and regular and structured consultation between community midwives, gynecologists and other care providers such as social workers, is part of this study. Neighborhoods in 14 municipalities with adverse perinatal outcomes above national and municipal averages are selected for participation. The study concerns a cluster randomized controlled trial. Municipalities are randomly allocated to intervention (n = 3,500 pregnant women) and control groups (n = 3,500 pregnant women). The intervention consists of systematic risk selection with the Rotterdam Reproductive Risk Reduction (R4U) score card in pregnant women at the booking visit, and referral to corresponding care pathways. A risk score, based on weighed risk factors derived from the R4U, above a predefined threshold determines structured multidisciplinary consultation. Primary outcomes of this trial are dysmaturity (birth weight < p10), prematurity (birth <37 weeks), and efficacy of implementation. The 'HP4ALL' study introduces a systematic approach in antenatal health care that may improve perinatal outcomes and, thereby, affect future health status of a new generation in the Netherlands.Trial registration: Dutch Trial Registry (NTR-3367) on 20 March 2012.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · Trials
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    ABSTRACT: Background The concept of responsiveness, introduced by the World Health Organization (WHO), addresses non-clinical aspects of health service quality that are relevant regardless of provider, country, health system or health condition. Responsiveness refers to ¿aspects related to the way individuals are treated and the environment in which they are treated¿ during health system interactions. This paper assesses the psychometric properties of a newly developed responsiveness questionnaire dedicated to evaluating maternal experiences of perinatal care services, called the Responsiveness in Perinatal and Obstetric Health Care Questionnaire (ReproQ), using the eight-domain WHO concept.Methods The ReproQ was developed between October 2009 and February 2010 by adapting the WHO Responsiveness Questionnaire items to the perinatal care context. The psychometric properties of feasibility, construct validity, and discriminative validity were empirically assessed in a sample of Dutch women two weeks post partum.ResultsA total of 171 women consented to participation. Feasibility: the interviews lasted between 20 and 40 minutes and the overall missing rate was 8%. Construct validity: mean Cronbach¿s alphas for the antenatal, birth and postpartum phase were: 0.73 (range 0.57-0.82), 0.84 (range 0.66-0.92), and 0.87 (range 0.62-0.95) respectively. The item-own scale correlations within all phases were considerably higher than most of the item-other scale correlations. Within the antenatal care, birth care and post partum phases, the eight factors explained 69%, 69%, and 76% of variance respectively. Discriminative validity: overall responsiveness mean sum scores were higher for women whose children were not admitted. This confirmed the hypothesis that dissatisfaction with health outcomes is transferred to their judgement on responsiveness of the perinatal services.Conclusions The ReproQ interview-based questionnaire demonstrated satisfactory psychometric properties to describe the quality of perinatal care in the Netherlands, with the potential to discriminate between different levels of quality of care. In view of the relatively small sample, further testing and research is recommended.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · BMC Health Services Research
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    ABSTRACT: IntroductionAntenatal screening for depressive/anxiety symptoms could be biased by worries surrounding the first ultrasound (US). Therefore, we examined the potential influence of worries surrounding the first US on systematic screening for depressive/anxiety symptoms during pregnancy.Materials and Methods We obtained data from 573 women screened consecutively in midwifery practices and hospitals in the Netherlands. Data included the Edinburgh Depression Scale (EDS), having had an US, and its perceived influence on women's worries.ResultsIn total, 18% had EDS scores ≥10 (n = 105). Among 392 women who underwent an US, currently existing worries, introduced or unaltered by the US, predicted depressive/anxiety symptoms (aOR: 3.41, P < 0.001). Among 181 women who did not undergo an US, expected continuation of existing worries after the US predicted depressive/anxiety symptoms (aOR: 18.84, P = 0.046), in contrast to worries which were expected to subside.DiscussionIn our cohort, depressive and/or anxiety symptoms were not associated with transient worries, reduced by a first US, suggesting no bias. If true, antenatal screening for anxiety/depressive symptoms should not depend on the timing of this US examination.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
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    ABSTRACT: Abstract Psychopathology, psychosocial problems and substance use (PPS) commonly occur in pregnant women, and can have a negative impact on the course of pregnancy and the healthy development of the child. As PPS often remains undetected and untreated during pregnancy, we developed and implemented a four-step screen-and-treat protocol in routine obstetric care, with: (i) screening including triage and subsequent confirmation, (ii) indication assessment, (iii) transfer towards care and (iv) utilization of care. Adherence to the protocol and risk factors associated with dropout were examined for 236 Dutch pregnant women in a deprived urban area. Seventy-nine percent of women accepted the screening, 21% dropped out during triage, 15% during confirmation, 3% during transfer and 8% thereafter. Provided reasons for dropout were lack of time and lack of perceived benefit. In particular, smokers, multiparous women, and women of non-Western ethnicity dropout on the way towards mental and psychosocial care. For a successful implementation of the protocol in the future, with improved adherence of pregnant women to the protocol, education of women on PPS risks, motivational skills and compulsory treatment are worth investigation.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2014 · Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology
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    ABSTRACT: Objective: To investigate the relation between prenatal ultrasound measurements of viscero-abdominal disproportion and the expected type of postnatal surgical closure of an omphalocele. Study design: Retrospectively, 24 fetuses diagnosed with an isolated omphalocele in the 2nd trimester of pregnancy were selected (period 2003-2013). An image of the axial plane of the abdomen at the level of the defect was retrieved. The ratio of omphalocele circumference to abdominal circumference (OC/AC), and the ratio of defect diameter to abdominal diameter (DD/DA) were calculated. Prognostic outcome was primary closure. Sensitivity and specificity and the corresponding area under the ROC curve of these ratios were calculated as measurements of prognostic accuracy. Results: Primary closure was achieved in 15/24 cases. For the OC/AC-ratio a cut-off value of 0.82 successfully predicted outcome in 23/24 cases with an area under the ROC curve of 0.99. A cut-off value of 0.61 for the DD/DA-ratio successfully predicted type of closure in 20/24 cases with an area under the ROC curve of 0.88. In all cases without eviscerated liver tissue, the defect was primarily closed. Conclusion: In prenatal isolated omphalocele cases, the OC/AC-ratio is better at predicting postnatal surgical closure than the DD/DA-ratio and can be used as a prognostic tool for expected type of closure in the 2nd trimester of pregnancy.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology

Publication Stats

12k Citations
1,190.14 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2007-2015
    • Erasmus MC
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 1990-2015
    • Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam
      • • Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
      • • Department of Public Health (MGZ)
      • • Institute of Health Policy & Management (iBMG)
      • • Institute for Medical Technology Assessment (iMTA)
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2012-2014
    • Hogeschool Rotterdam
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 2009
    • Rotterdam School of Management
      Rotterdam, South Holland, Netherlands
  • 1997-2009
    • University of Amsterdam
      • • Department of Public Health
      • • Faculty of Medicine AMC
      • • Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
      • • Department of Anesthesiology
      • • Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2008
    • GGD Amsterdam
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 1996-2008
    • Academisch Medisch Centrum Universiteit van Amsterdam
      • • Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology
      • • Department of Social Medicine
      • • Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 1994-2006
    • University Medical Center Utrecht
      • Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care
      Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • 1993-2006
    • Utrecht University
      Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • 2005
    • Gemeentelijke Geneeskundige en Gezondheidsdienst
      Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands
  • 2004
    • VU University Amsterdam
      • Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology
      Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
  • 2002
    • Radboud University Medical Centre (Radboudumc)
      Nymegen, Gelderland, Netherlands
  • 1995-1996
    • Wilhelmina Hospital,
      Assen, Drenthe, Netherlands
    • Canisius-Wilhelmina Ziekenhuis
      Nymegen, Gelderland, Netherlands