Daniele Fabris

Albany State University, Олбани, Georgia, United States

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Publications (69)313.66 Total impact

  • Rebecca E Rose · Manuel A Pazos · M Joan Curcio · Daniele Fabris
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    ABSTRACT: The simultaneous detection of all the post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) that decorate cellular RNA can provide comprehensive information on the effects of changing environmental conditions on the entire epitranscriptome. For this reason, we performed the analysis of ribonucleotide mixtures produced by hydrolysis of total RNA extracts from S. cerevisiae that was grown under hyperosmotic and heat shock conditions. These global PTM profiles clearly indicated that the cellular responses to these types of stresses involved profound changes in the production of specific PTMs. The observed effects involved not only up-/down-regulation of typical PTMs, but also the outright induction of new ones that were absent under normal conditions, or the elimination of others that were normally present. Pointing toward the broad participation of different classes of RNAs, many of the newly observed PTMs differed from those involved in the known tRNA-based mechanism of translational recoding induced by oxidative stress. Some of the expression effects were stress-specific, while others were not, thus suggesting that RNA PTMs may perform multifaceted activities in stress response, which are subjected to distinctive regulatory pathways. In order to explore their signaling networks, we implemented a strategy based on the systematic deletion of genes connecting established response genes with PTM biogenetic enzymes in a putative interactomic map. The results clearly identified PTMs that were under direct HOG control, a well-known protein kinase pathway involved in stress response in eukaryotes. This pathway has been shown to stabilize numerous mRNAs and to induce a specific class of lncRNAs involved in chromatin remodeling. The fact that PTMs are capable of altering the activity of the parent RNAs suggest their possible participation in feedback mechanisms aimed at modulating the regulatory functions of such RNAs. This tantalizing hypothesis will be the object of future studies.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2016 · Molecular & Cellular Proteomics
  • Rebecca E Rose · Ryan Quinn · Jackie L Sayre · Daniele Fabris
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    ABSTRACT: The elucidation of the biological significance of RNA post-transcriptional modifications is hampered by the dearth of effective high-throughput sequencing approaches for detecting, locating, and tracking their levels as a function of predetermined experimental factors. With the goal of confronting this knowledge gap, we devised a strategy for completing global surveys of all ribonucleotide modifications in a cell, which is based on the analysis of whole cell extracts by direct infusion electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Our approach eschews chromatographic separation to promote instead the direct application of MS techniques capable of providing detection, differentiation, and quantification of post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) in complex ribonucleotide mixtures. Accurate mass analysis was used to carry out database-aided identification of PTMs, whereas multistep tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) and consecutive reaction monitoring (CRM) provided the necessary structural corroboration. We demonstrated that heat-map plots afforded by ion mobility spectrometry mass spectrometry (IMS-MS) can provide comprehensive modification profiles that are unique for different cell types and metabolic states. We showed that isolated tRNA samples can be used as controlled sources of PTMs in standard-additions quantification. Intrinsic internal standards enable direct comparisons of heat-maps obtained under different experimental conditions, thus offering the opportunity to evaluate the global effects of such conditions on the expression levels of all PTMs simultaneously. This type of comparative analysis will be expected to support the investigation of the system biology of RNA modifications, which will be aimed at exploring mutual correlations of their expression levels and providing new valuable insights into their biological significance. © 2015 Rose et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.
    No preview · Article · May 2015 · RNA
  • P N Asare-Okai · E Agustin · D Fabris · M Royzen
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    ABSTRACT: This communication describes a general approach for site-specific fluorescence labelling of RNA using a cytidine triphosphate (CTP) analogue derivatized with a trans-cyclooctene group. The analogue was efficiently incorporated into a model RNA strand using in vitro transcription. Bio-orthogonal reaction with fluorescein-labelled tetrazine was utilized to fluorescently tag the synthetic RNA strand.
    No preview · Article · Jun 2014 · Chemical Communications
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    Matteo Scalabrin · Yik Siu · Papa Nii Asare-Okai · Daniele Fabris
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    ABSTRACT: Supported by high-throughput sequencing technologies, structure-specific nucleases are experiencing a renaissance as biochemical probes for genome-wide mapping of nucleic acid structure. This report explores the benefits and pitfalls of the application of Mung bean (Mb) and V1 nuclease, which attack specifically single- and double-stranded regions of nucleic acids, as possible structural probes to be employed in combination with MS detection. Both enzymes were found capable of operating in ammonium-based solutions that are preferred for high-resolution analysis by direct infusion electrospray ionization (ESI). Sequence analysis by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was performed to confirm mapping assignments and to resolve possible ambiguities arising from the concomitant formation of isobaric products with identical base composition and different sequences. The observed products grouped together into ladder-type series that facilitated their assignment to unique regions of the substrate, but revealed also a certain level of uncertainty in identifying the boundaries between paired and unpaired regions. Various experimental factors that are known to stabilize nucleic acid structure, such as higher ionic strength, presence of Mg(II), etc., increased the accuracy of cleavage information, but did not completely eliminate deviations from expected results. These observations suggest extreme caution in interpreting the results afforded by these types of reagents. Regardless of the analytical platform of choice, the results highlighted the need to repeat probing experiments under the most diverse possible conditions to recognize potential artifacts and to increase the level of confidence in the observed structural information. Figure ᅟ
    Full-text · Article · May 2014 · Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry
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    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · Biophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: The challenges posed by the analysis of mono-nucleotide mixtures by direct infusion electrospray ionization were examined in the context of recent advances of mass spectrometry (MS) technologies. In particular, we evaluated the merits of high-resolution mass analysis, multistep gas-phase dissociation, and ion mobility determinations for the characterization of species with very similar or identical elemental composition. The high resolving power afforded by a linear trap quadrupole-orbitrap allowed the complete differentiation of overlapping isotopic distributions produced by nucleotides that differed by a single mass unit. Resolving 12C signals from nearly overlapped 13C contributions provided the exact masses necessary to calculate matching elemental compositions for unambiguous formulae assignment. However, it was the ability to perform sequential steps of gas-phase dissociation (i.e. MSn-type analysis) that proved more valuable for discriminating between truly isobaric nucleotides, such as the AMP/dGMP and UMP/ΨMP couples, which were differentiated in the mixture from their unique fragmentation patterns. The identification of diagnostic fragments enabled the deconvolution of dissociation spectra containing the products of coexisting isobars that could not be individually isolated in the mass-selection step. Approaches based on ion mobility spectrometry-MS provided another dimension upon which isobaric nucleotides could be differentiated according to their distinctive mobility behaviors. Subtle structural variations, such as the different positions of an oxygen atom in AMP/dGMP or the glycosidic bond in UMP/ΨMP, produced detectable differences in the respective ion mobility profiles, which enabled the differentiation of the isobaric couples in the mixture. Parallel activation of all ions emerging from the ion mobility element provided an additional dimension for differentiating these analytes on the basis of both mobility and fragmentation properties. Copyright
    No preview · Article · Jun 2013 · Journal of Mass Spectrometry
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    ABSTRACT: In minimal RNA kissing complexes formed between hairpins with cognate GACG tetraloops, the two tertiary GC pairs are likely stabilized by the stacking of 5'-unpaired adenines at each end of the short helix. To test this hypothesis, we mutated the flanking adenines to various nucleosides and examined their effects on the kissing interaction. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry was used to detect kissing dimers in a multi-equilibria mixture, whereas optical tweezers were applied to monitor the (un)folding trajectories of single RNA molecules. The experimental findings were rationalized by molecular dynamics simulations. Together, the results showed that the stacked adenines are indispensable for the tertiary interaction. By shielding the tertiary base pairs from solvent and reducing their fraying, the stacked adenines made terminal pairs act more like interior base pairs. The purine double-ring of adenine was essential for effective stacking, whereas additional functional groups modulated the stabilizing effects through varying hydrophobic and electrostatic forces. Furthermore, formation of the kissing complex was dominated by base pairing, whereas its dissociation was significantly influenced by the flanking bases. Together, these findings indicate that unpaired flanking nucleotides play essential roles in the formation of otherwise unstable two-base-pair RNA tertiary interactions.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2013 · Journal of the American Chemical Society
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    ABSTRACT: A stable RNA helix requires at least three base pairs. Surprisingly, a tertiary kissing complex formed between two GACG hairpin loops contains only two GC pairs. In the NMR structure of this complex, the two flanking adenosines stack on the kissing GC pair. This observation raised a possibility that the 5’-dangling adenines contribute to the formation and stability of the kissing interaction. To test this hypothesis, we took a two-pronged approach to examine the effects of various mutational and chemical modifications of the flanking adenosines on the folding of the kissing complex. Using mass spectrometry, we studied formation of kissing dimers formed by different hairpins. Using optical tweezers, we monitored mechanical unfolding of intramolecular kissing complex at single-molecule level. In both experiments, replacing adenine with uridine abolished the kissing interaction, suggesting that a minimal kissing complex must contain two GC pairs flanked by inter-strand stacking adenines. The stabilizing effect by the adenines can be explained by the fact that the stacking purine nucleobases shield the hydrogen bonds of the adjacent GC pairs, preventing them from fraying. Unlike in the context of secondary structure, the 5’-unpaired adenines in the tertiary structure are structurally constrained in a way that allows for effective stacking onto the adjacent base pairs.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2013 · Biophysical Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Caught in the oxirane: Naphthalene diimides conjugated to a quinone methide and an oxirane have been synthesized and investigated as selective DNA G-quadruplex alkylating agents. The oxirane derivative generates a stable adduct with a G-quadruplex and shows selective alkylation of the loop adenines, as illustrated.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2013 · Chemistry - A European Journal
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    ABSTRACT: Since its inception in 1994, The RNA Modification Database (RNAMDB, http://rna-mdb.cas.albany.edu/RNAmods/) has served as a focal point for information pertaining to naturally occurring RNA modifications. In its current state, the database employs an easy-to-use, searchable interface for obtaining detailed data on the 109 currently known RNA modifications. Each entry provides the chemical structure, common name and symbol, elemental composition and mass, CA registry numbers and index name, phylogenetic source, type of RNA species in which it is found, and references to the first reported structure determination and synthesis. Though newly transferred in its entirety to The RNA Institute, the RNAMDB continues to grow with two notable additions, agmatidine and 8-methyladenosine, appended in the last year. The RNA Modification Database is staying up-to-date with significant improvements being prepared for inclusion within the next year and the following year. The expanded future role of The RNA Modification Database will be to serve as a primary information portal for researchers across the entire spectrum of RNA-related research.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2010 · Nucleic Acids Research
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    Daniele Fabris · Eizadora T Yu
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    ABSTRACT: Chemical probing represents a very versatile alternative for studying the structure and dynamics of substrates that are intractable by established high-resolution techniques. The implementation of MS-based strategies for the characterization of probing products has not only extended the range of applicability to virtually all types of biopolymers but has also paved the way for the introduction of new reagents that would not have been viable with traditional analytical platforms. As the availability of probing data is steadily increasing on the wings of the development of dedicated interpretation aids, powerful computational approaches have been explored to enable the effective utilization of such information to generate valid molecular models. This combination of factors has contributed to making the possibility of obtaining actual 3D structures by MS-based technologies (MS3D) a reality. Although approaches for achieving structure determination of unknown targets or assessing the dynamics of known structures may share similar reagents and development trajectories, they clearly involve distinctive experimental strategies, analytical concerns and interpretation paradigms. This Perspective offers a commentary on methods aimed at obtaining distance constraints for the modeling of full-fledged structures while highlighting common elements, salient distinctions and complementary capabilities exhibited by methods used in dynamics studies. We discuss critical factors to be addressed for completing effective structural determinations and expose possible pitfalls of chemical methods. We survey programs developed for facilitating the interpretation of experimental data and discuss possible computational strategies for translating sparse spatial constraints into all-atom models. Examples are provided to illustrate how the concerted application of very diverse probing techniques can lead to the solution of actual biological systems.
    Preview · Article · Aug 2010 · Journal of Mass Spectrometry
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    ABSTRACT: ChemInform is a weekly Abstracting Service, delivering concise information at a glance that was extracted from about 100 leading journals. To access a ChemInform Abstract of an article which was published elsewhere, please select a “Full Text” option. The original article is trackable via the “References” option.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2010 · ChemInform
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    D Fabris · P A Limbach

    Preview · Article · Mar 2010 · Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry
  • Daniele Fabris · Kevin Turner · Nathan Hagan

    No preview · Chapter · Dec 2009
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    Daniele Fabris · John P Marino · Stuart F J Le Grice
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    ABSTRACT: Although polypurine tract (PPT)-primed initiation of plus-strand DNA synthesis in retroviruses and LTR-containing retrotransposons can be accurately duplicated, the molecular details underlying this concerted series of events remain largely unknown. Importantly, the PPT 3' terminus must be accommodated by ribonuclease H (RNase H) and DNA polymerase catalytic centers situated at either terminus of the cognate reverse transcriptase (RT), and in the case of the HIV-1 enzyme, ∼70Å apart. Communication between RT and the RNA/DNA hybrid therefore appears necessary to promote these events. The crystal structure of the HIV-1 RT/PPT complex, while informative, positions the RNase H active site several bases pairs from the PPT/U3 junction, and thus provides limited information on cleavage specificity. To fill the gap between biochemical and crystallographic approaches, we review a multidisciplinary approach combining chemical probing, mass spectrometry, NMR spectroscopy and single molecule spectroscopy. Our studies also indicate that nonnucleoside RT inhibitors affect enzyme orientation, suggesting initiation of plus-strand DNA synthesis as a potential therapeutic target.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2009 · Viruses
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    Daniele Fabris
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    ABSTRACT: The advances of mass spectrometry in the analysis of nucleic acids have tracked very closely the exciting developments of instrumentation and ancillary technologies, which have taken place over the years. However, their diffusion in the broader life sciences community has been and will be linked to the ever evolving focus of biomedical research and its changing demands. Before the completion of the Human Genome Project, great emphasis was placed on sequencing technologies that could help accomplish this project of exceptional scale. After the publication of the human genome, the emphasis switched toward techniques dedicated to the exploration of sequences not coding for actual protein products, which amount to the vast majority of transcribed elements. The broad range of capabilities offered by mass spectrometry is rapidly advancing this platform to the forefront of the technologies employed for the structure-function investigation of these noncoding elements. Increasing focus on the characterization of functional assemblies and their specific interactions has prompted a re-evaluation of what has been traditionally construed as nucleic acid analysis by mass spectrometry. Inspired by the accelerating expansion of the broader field of nucleic acid research, new applications to fundamental biological studies and drug discovery will help redefine the evolving role of MS-analysis of nucleic acids in the post-genomics age.
    Preview · Article · Sep 2009 · Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry
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    ABSTRACT: During (−)-strand DNA synthesis in retroviruses and Saccharomyces cerevisiae LTR retrotransposons, a purine rich region of the RNA template, known as the polypurine tract (PPT), is resistant to RNase H-mediated hydrolysis and subsequently serves as a primer for (+)-strand, DNA-dependent DNA synthesis. Although HIV-1 and Ty3 PPT sequences share no sequence similarity beyond the fact that both include runs of purine ribonucleotides, it has been suggested that these PPTs are processed by their cognate reverse transcriptases (RTs) through a common molecular mechanism. Here, we have used the aminoglycoside neomycin B (NB) to examine which structural features of the Ty3 PPT contribute to specific recognition and processing by its cognate RT. Using high-resolution NMR, direct infusion FTICR mass spectrometry, and isothermal titration calorimetry, we show that NB binds preferentially and selectively adjacent to the Ty3 3′ PPT−U3 cleavage junction and in an upstream 5′ region where the thumb subdomain of Ty3 RT putatively grips the substrate. Regions highlighted by NB on the Ty3 PPT are similar to those previously identified on the HIV-1 PPT sequence that are implicated as contact points for substrate binding by its RT. Our findings thus support the notion that common structural features of lentiviral and LTR-retrotransposon PPTs facilitate the interaction with their cognate RT.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2009 · Biochemistry
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    ABSTRACT: Selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) has gained popularity as a facile method of examining RNA structure both in vitro and in vivo, exploiting accessibility of the ribose 2'-OH to acylation by N-methylisatoic anhydride (NMIA) in unpaired or flexible configurations. Subsequent primer extension terminates at the site of chemical modification, and these products are fractionated by high-resolution gel electrophoresis. When applying SHAPE to investigate structural features associated with the wild-type and analog-substituted polypurine tract (PPT)-containing RNA/DNA hybrids, their size (20-25 base pairs) rendered primer extension impractical. As an alternative method of detection, we reasoned that chemical modification could be combined with tandem mass spectrometry, relying on the mass increment of RNA fragments containing the NMIA adduct (M(r) = 133 Da). Using this approach, we demonstrate both specific modification of the HIV-1 PPT RNA primer and variations in its acylation pattern induced by replacing template nucleotides with a non-hydrogen-bonding thymine isostere. Our selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by mass spectrometry strategy (SHAMS) should find utility when examining the structure of small RNA fragments or RNA/DNA hybrids where primer extension cannot be performed.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2009 · RNA
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    Alexei Gapeev · Alberto Berton · Daniele Fabris
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    ABSTRACT: The hypothesis that direct determination of electrospray current would provide a viable method for maintaining spray stability to enable optimal nanospray analysis was tested by building a feedback apparatus capable of reading the current and readjusting the emitter voltage in real time. The apparatus consists of a current-sensing circuit that reads the voltage drop across a resistor located between the high-voltage power supply and the nanospray emitter. A low voltage proportional to the observed current is generated and sent to a data acquisition card. The information is used by a proportional-derivative-integral (PID) algorithm to calculate the magnitude of a low-voltage signal that is used to control the power supply output. Any variation of current across the sensing resistor is thus counteracted by an opposite-direction variation of the high voltage applied to the nanospray emitter. In this way, the apparatus adjusts the emitter voltage to achieve a preset value of current, which it strives to maintain over time in spite of any possible variation of the parameters influencing the spray regime. Preliminary results have shown that the feedback apparatus is capable of establishing and maintaining stable spray for samples that are usually considered challenging in traditional voltage-controlled analysis, such as those consisting of nucleic acid solutions with high salt loads. For these types of samples, the total ion count recorded in current-controlled mode was significantly more stable than that observed in voltage-controlled mode. At the same time, overall signal intensities and signal-to-noise ratios were also significantly improved. Setting the target nanospray current to a predefined value and letting the apparatus reach the target without operator intervention enabled the acquisition of viable data from solutions containing up to 2.5 M ammonium acetate, which are ordinarily difficult by traditional manual tuning. A deeper understanding of the current-voltage relationships for samples of very different compositions is expected to enable one not only to predict the target current that should be used for a certain analysis, but also to devise algorithms to change such target as a function of predictable variations of sample properties and analytical conditions. This will allow for optimal performance to be maintained during on-line gradient chromatography in which the nature of the sprayed solution may vary very widely during the course of the analysis.
    Preview · Article · Apr 2009 · Journal of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry
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    ABSTRACT: The nature of specific RNA-RNA and protein-RNA interactions involved in the process of genome dimerization and isomerization in HIV-1, which is mediated in vitro by stemloop 1 (SL1) of the packaging signal and by the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of the viral Gag polyprotein, was investigated by using archetypical nucleic acid ligands as noncovalent probes. Small-molecule ligands make contact with their target substrates through complex combinations of H-bonds, salt bridges, and hydrophobic interactions. Therefore, their binding patterns assessed by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry can provide valuable insights into the factors determining specific recognition between species involved in biopolymer assemblies. In the case of SL1, dimerization and isomerization create unique structural features capable of sustaining stable interactions with classic nucleic acid ligands. The binding modes exhibited by intercalators and minor groove binders were adversely affected by the significant distortion of the duplex formed by palindrome annealing in the kissing-loop (KL) dimer, whereas the modes observed for the corresponding extended duplex (ED) confirmed a more regular helical structure. Consistent with the ability to establish electrostatic interactions with highly negative pockets typical of helix anomalies, polycationic aminoglycosides bound to the stem-bulge motif conserved in all SL1 conformers, to the unpaired nucleotides located at the hinge between kissing hairpins in KL, and to the exposed bases flanking the palindrome duplex in ED. The patterns afforded by intercalators and minor groove binders did not display detectable variations when the corresponding NC-SL1 complexes were submitted to probing. In contrast, aminoglycosides displayed the ability to compete with the protein for overlapping sites, producing opposite effects on the isomerization process. Indeed, displacing NC from the stem-bulges of the KL dimer induced inhibition of stem melting and decreased the efficiency of isomerization. Competition for the hinge region, instead, eliminated the NC stabilization of a grip motif formed by nucleobases of opposite strands, thus facilitating the strand-exchange required for isomerization. These noncovalent probes provided further evidence that the structural context of the actual binding sites has significant influence on the chaperone activities of NC, which should be taken in account when developing potential drug candidates aimed at disrupting genome dimerization and isomerization in HIV-1. © 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 91: 283–296, 2009. This article was originally published online as an accepted preprint. The “Published Online” date corresponds to the preprint version. You can request a copy of the preprint by emailing the Biopolymers editorial office at biopolymers@wiley.com
    Preview · Article · Apr 2009 · Biopolymers

Publication Stats

2k Citations
313.66 Total Impact Points

Institutions

  • 2013-2014
    • Albany State University
      • Division of Chemistry
      Олбани, Georgia, United States
  • 1993-2010
    • University of Maryland, Baltimore County
      • Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • 2003-2005
    • University of Maryland, Baltimore
      Baltimore, Maryland, United States